LumberJocks

Spraying Lacquer -- getting a rough finish

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by tooldad posted 03-14-2009 05:02 AM 10232 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View tooldad's profile

tooldad

660 posts in 3176 days


03-14-2009 05:02 AM

Topic tags/keywords: spray lacquer finish

Originally I had the $89 HVLP turbine sprayer from Rocker. That lasted me about a year and a half until the hose broke. Good excuse to upgrade. The earlex showed up on Wednesday this week :) With the rockler sprayer I can get glass smooth finishes. Sand project to 220. Spray vinyl sealer on project, resand 220 or 280 and then spray 2-3 of precat lacquer. Usually after the sealer I sand, but not needed between the other coats. I just eyeball the thinner when I add it to the cup, about 1/2” in the bottom and used the only needle that came with the rockler gun.

The earlex came with the 2.0 and 1.5mm needles. I chose the 1.5mm needle, a little smaller I am sure than the rockler. It also came with viscosity and measuring cup which is 10% of a quart. So I used the cup to measure the thinner. I would say a little more than what I normally put in. Even after 1 coat sealer, 3 coats of lacquer, I still have the “rasising the grain” effect.

Is it the smaller needle? The sprayer? or more thinner than normal?

Any suggestions or tips would be appreciated.


11 replies so far

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 3776 days


#1 posted 03-14-2009 06:00 AM

Try the 2.0, if that doesn’t do it then add more thinner ( I know but try it)

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3561 days


#2 posted 03-14-2009 06:11 AM

Solvent lacquers do not raise the grain. Are you getting dry spray that is creating a rough finish?

I use a pressure pot for spraying my lacquers but I did use my brother’s HVLP a couple of times while working in Ohio. As I recall, even though it was spraying at 4psi (sound right?) it blew a large volume of air. I kind of remember that it was warm air too and so it caused more dry fall on the finish. Could this be the problem?

I have switched from Sherwin pre-cats to M.L. Campbell’s Magna Max. It has a higher durability rating for kitchen and bath use than the Sherwin products and does not require the vinyl sealer.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3561 days


#3 posted 03-14-2009 06:14 AM

If you do not have the needle adjusted for good flow, the coat may be too light and not laying out wet enough. This could cause a dry fall effect. Air to fluid ratio could be too high.

Shot in the dark here since I do not have enough information or can see it.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View tooldad's profile

tooldad

660 posts in 3176 days


#4 posted 03-14-2009 03:22 PM

Sorry if i was incorrect on my fluid description. I am using the ML campbell products. Vinyl sealer, and magna max. I would say for the most part i am 6-9 inches away. My guess from the descriptions posted is that it is drying before it gets to the wood. In fact I did notice that the overspray wasn’t as bad and haze in the room. Thought that was a result of the new spraryer, I still hope that is the case, but it might be it is drying to quickly. I think I will bump up to the 2.0 needle size, or do you think I should add more thinner? I would say the fluid control is about 1/2 – 3/4 open. Sprayer is at my shop not at home. So I wont be able to test again till after the weekend. Thanks for the input.

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3561 days


#5 posted 03-14-2009 04:27 PM

I’d say that you are getting on track.

I use the pressure pot because it just has two hoses and the gun. I find this easier than wielding the fluid jar on the gun. It produces more fog than an HVLP, but less than a gravity feed or siphon feed running off the compressor.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3561 days


#6 posted 03-14-2009 04:52 PM

I would think that you would want to add retarder to slow the drying time. More thinning causes a higher solvent to solids ratio with evaporates faster.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View tooldad's profile

tooldad

660 posts in 3176 days


#7 posted 03-14-2009 05:01 PM

With the ealex system, I don’t have much control, just thinner ratio and fluid control. The campbell hausfeld that my old school had (we used it for painting though) had warm air, this one has room temp air, but still I am sure it is contributing to drying. I will lessen the thinner amount back to what I used to use and try to see if I can test viscosity. I was doing what the previous shop teacher at my school who is not retired, was telling me to do. Now I read the directions, and go figure, it is messed up.

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3561 days


#8 posted 03-14-2009 06:59 PM

Cessna – I did some shopping and had looked at an HVLP with a pressure pot. I had thought this might be a good option.

My reference to the guns that put out more fog are the ones that just run off the air compressor, not as part of an HVLP system. I have both gravity feed and siphon feed guns and they produce more overspray than my pressure pot system. My pressure pot system definitely produces more overspray than an HVLP.

I had also looked into a system that most don’t recognize and that is the air assisted airless. It is a combination of an airless sprayer (very high pressure) and a compressor. The pro painters I know here have sworn off HVLP’s and are going with this system. It runs about $2,200.00 at Sherwin. This is not so much an option for most woodworkers at LJ but, as a professional, it is something that I have considered. This has a transfer efficiency rating that is equal to or a bit better than the HVLP (supposedly.)

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View tooldad's profile

tooldad

660 posts in 3176 days


#9 posted 03-17-2009 03:44 AM

problem basically solved. Went to the 2.0mm needle and a little less thinner (eyeballed it like before) and ended up with a smooth coat even on the inside of the cabinet.

thanks for the input

I will be posting my personal review of the earlex soon

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3561 days


#10 posted 03-17-2009 04:09 AM

Good to hear that it worked out for you. I look forward to seeing the project that you are finishing and the review.

Good to see you are using a quality pro finish too.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Frankie Talarico Jr.'s profile

Frankie Talarico Jr.

353 posts in 2818 days


#11 posted 03-21-2009 02:05 AM

I agree with the aforementioned I think your drying too quickly. The tip is another possibility 2.0 is a little better at keeping a “wet” edge. the 1.5 might be used when spraying rails or other intricate details. ML cambell has a slow reducer. I think the number on the can is 409 not too sure. But this helps slow down the dry time. A good six to eight inches is plenty of space between make sure your not travelling too fast. Hot or cold dry days make your job harder.

-- Live by what you believe, not what they want you to believe.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com