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1/16" crown in new workbench top

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Forum topic by BinghamtonEd posted 01-09-2015 04:41 PM 897 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


01-09-2015 04:41 PM

Just a sanity check here, please bear with me…

I just recently glued up my workbench top. I was originally going to stick with MDF for budget reasons, but I got a couple HD gift cards and culled through the Douglas Fir 2×10’s.

The top is about 2 1/16” thick. 93” long, by 26” deep. I’ve gone over it with my #5 to clean it up after the final glue up.

There is a 1/16” crown in the center of the top when looking at it from the front. Front-to back, it’s flat, checked it with winding sticks and it appears to be twist-free.

Am I best to just take back at it with my #5 (don’t have anything larger) and bring that 1/16” down? How picky should I be?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.


9 replies so far

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JayT

4772 posts in 1672 days


#1 posted 01-09-2015 04:44 PM

First question is what all you are planning to use your workbench for. If needing it flat because you will also be doing assembly, then yes, I would work the #5 at diagonals to take it down. If you don’t need it perfectly flat right now, I would wait a few more months as things stablize, then flatten again.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#2 posted 01-09-2015 04:49 PM

I work in a 2-car garage so this workbench will be used for everything…hand & power tools, joinery, assembly, finishing. (For finish work, I’m planning on getting a large, wide roll of parchment/wax paper from the local restaurant supply, and mounting a rod to hold it, so it can be pulled over to protect the top).

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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NoThanks

798 posts in 990 days


#3 posted 01-09-2015 04:55 PM

Better the work bench be sued^ than you..LOL (That damn workbench)
I think I would wait a spell and see if gravity helps it settle down. Is it sitting on top of a sub frame where you could pull it down maybe with an L bracket or something that will still let the top movement happen.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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JayT

4772 posts in 1672 days


#4 posted 01-09-2015 04:57 PM

Instead of the paper, I have a 5’ section of old laminate countertop that I can throw on the bench for finishing & gluing. It’s nice because I can also use the countertop on the table saw or a couple saw horses as an assembly and finish table. Gives a lot of flexibility for use. The countertop is flat, so also doesn’t rely on my bench staying perfectly flat for assembly. When not in use, it stands up against the wall so doesn’t take up much space.

May not be a good solution for you, but wanted to throw it out there.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#5 posted 01-09-2015 04:58 PM


Better the work bench be sued^ than you..LOL
- Iwud4u

Haha, oops, fixed it.


I think I would wait a spell and see if gravity helps it settle down. Is it sitting on top of a sub frame where you could pull it down maybe with an L bracket or something that will still let the top movement happen.

It’s sitting on top of a cabinet base which is surprisingly, since I made it, is flat. I could but a couple small screws/lags up from underneath in the middle to encourage it to flatten out, and then check it again in a month or so.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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Loren

8295 posts in 3109 days


#6 posted 01-09-2015 09:47 PM

Yeah, I’d bring it down.

I haven’t flattened my bench in several years and it
has become swaybacked. This isn’t as troubling
as you might expect, because it’s not twisted.
It’s twist that will throw the work off. If you’re
flattening a 5’ x 10” wide board you can flip it over
to check against the bench surface. Actually
swaybacked is probably preferable to crowned.

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1396 days


#7 posted 01-10-2015 12:28 AM

First off, that would bother me too, so you aren’t crazy.

In my opinion, let it sit for a while and do a project or two on it. If it causes assembly issues, fix it soon. If it just bothers you, wait for it to settle and then fix it. Either way I would probably fix it, but if you can hold off doing it, you may save yourself from doing it twice.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13713 posts in 2079 days


#8 posted 01-10-2015 03:51 AM

It’s an easy fix. Get ‘er done, I say.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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ColonelTravis

1189 posts in 1355 days


#9 posted 01-10-2015 07:18 AM



Instead of the paper, I have a 5 section of old laminate countertop that I can throw on the bench for finishing & gluing. It s nice because I can also use the countertop on the table saw or a couple saw horses as an assembly and finish table. Gives a lot of flexibility for use. The countertop is flat, so also doesn t rely on my bench staying perfectly flat for assembly. When not in use, it stands up against the wall so doesn t take up much space.

May not be a good solution for you, but wanted to throw it out there.

- JayT

I feel like a total idiot for never thinking of this. Thank you, thank you.

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