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Need helping identifying plane

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Forum topic by Joel_B posted 01-09-2015 04:19 AM 782 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel_B

294 posts in 847 days


01-09-2015 04:19 AM

Looking for a small block plane like this to work on guitar parts.
I am guessing it is a Stanley 60 1/2 but the side profile doesn’t match.
As usual it seems I am better off buying a vintage one off Ebay and getting a Hock blade for it instead of a new stanley plane.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA


15 replies so far

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bandit571

14606 posts in 2149 days


#1 posted 01-09-2015 04:22 AM

Looks more like a #102 or a #103, due to the finger rest out front.

Back end looks like a #9-1/2….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2084 days


#2 posted 01-09-2015 04:30 AM

Some kind of Veritas block?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Joel_B

294 posts in 847 days


#3 posted 01-09-2015 04:31 AM

I don’t have much experience with hand planes.
The only one I have is a Bailey #5.
Is a low angle block plane best for finishing a scarf joint like this?
I read they are good for end grain, I guess this is somewhere between with the grain and end grain.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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ShaneA

6474 posts in 2064 days


#4 posted 01-09-2015 04:32 AM

Uh, the hand is getting in the way. Making it a tough call.

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Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#5 posted 01-09-2015 04:37 AM

That does look like a Veritas. Look up Bryan Burns… he’s
a luthier and recommends a Veritas plane these days. He
also developed an excellent sharpening system for working
with figured guitar woods.

That say, I do that operation with a smooth plane. I invert
the plane in a vise for dimensioning some small parts.

A modest benchtop belt sander and a sanding board are
really useful in making guitars. There’s a lot of card scraping
involved on the back and sides typically I use razor blades
often, with the corners dubbed off. Be real careful about
planing the rosette as they can chip out and then you’ll
have to mess around with lacquer burn-in sticks.

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Joel_B

294 posts in 847 days


#6 posted 01-09-2015 04:39 AM

I am pretty sure its this one:

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=46791&cat=1,41182,41189&ap=1

Its not terribly expensive, should I just get it or would something more versatile makes sense?

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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Joel_B

294 posts in 847 days


#7 posted 01-09-2015 04:49 AM



That does look like a Veritas. Look up Bryan Burns… he s
a luthier and recommends a Veritas plane these days. He
also developed an excellent sharpening system for working
with figured guitar woods.

That say, I do that operation with a smooth plane. I invert
the plane in a vise for dimensioning some small parts.

A modest benchtop belt sander and a sanding board are
really useful in making guitars. There s a lot of card scraping
involved on the back and sides typically I use razor blades
often, with the corners dubbed off. Be real careful about
planing the rosette as they can chip out and then you ll
have to mess around with lacquer burn-in sticks.

- Loren

Loren,

I have found a lot good info from luthiers who have videos and web sites on various aspects of guitar making.
Another plane question I have is for jointing the book matched top and sides I see a no 7 being used a lot although some people think a no 5 is fine, some people use a shooting board others don’t. Also a plane is needed for thicknessing the top and back not sure what to use there. I have a ton to learn.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#8 posted 01-09-2015 05:00 AM

I just clamp them together in the vice and joint the plates
slightly hollow with a jack. I have a nice straightedge though
so that helps. A 24” ground straightedge is useful for the
fingerboard and fret work anyway, essential to build to modern
action standards really.

I don’t consider a jointer plane needed for making guitars.
They just aren’t that big.

An electric jointer sure is useful though for the front of the
neck. Fingerboards generally come from suppliers sanded
flat enough on both faces, though one should dry clamp
and check before gluing. Those dense exotics tend to
be quite stable when dry.

I use a smoother for thicknessing the plates if a thickness
sander is not available. Unless you want to make your
own wood binding, I would say don’t buy a thickness
sander. You may want to avoid buying ebony binding
though, it’s real tricky to bend, especially cutaways and
pricey. I am talking pulling your hair out territory.

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Joel_B

294 posts in 847 days


#9 posted 01-09-2015 06:19 AM

Loren,

What type of vise do you use or recommend?
Thats another item I ned to get.
I have been looking for straight edges, I am thinking of getting the LV aluminum one.
I do have access to a power jointer.
How do you cut the neck scarf joint?
I am thinking of trying it on a power miter saw since I don’t yet have a band saw.
Nice to know I need that huge jointer plane, at least I will try to use the plane I have on some scrap and see what happens. Have you seen this on You Tube?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tx215PwT11I

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#10 posted 01-09-2015 06:22 AM

I have a Record 93 I think. I don’t especially recommend it
as it is temperamental.

Any decent vise with big cheeks will do. You can put spring
clamps up higher to hold the plates together. I shoot them
slightly hollow. I don’t have a shooting board but if I did
I might shoot them straight individually.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2084 days


#11 posted 01-09-2015 01:07 PM

Looks like you found it. If you don’t have a general purpose block, that one would be a fine pick-up.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Joel_B

294 posts in 847 days


#12 posted 01-09-2015 04:09 PM



I have a Record 93 I think. I don t especially recommend it
as it is temperamental.

Any decent vise with big cheeks will do. You can put spring
clamps up higher to hold the plates together. I shoot them
slightly hollow. I don t have a shooting board but if I did
I might shoot them straight individually.

- Loren

What do you mean by slightly hollow?
Does that mean a slight gap in the middle so when you clamp them together it closes?

I found this vise that looks really handy for guitar building but hesitant to buy it because of the negative reviews:

http://www.amazon.com/Shop-Fox-D3125-Parrot-Vise/dp/B0000DD4ZU/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

I will discuss that in separate thread.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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Joel_B

294 posts in 847 days


#13 posted 01-09-2015 07:07 PM

I am considering the Veritas Apron plane vs an old Stanley 60 1/2 off Ebay and put a new Hock blade in it.
The Stanley is slightly bigger and has an adjustable mouth and with a Hock blade should work really well, maybe more versatile than the apron plane?

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

View Loren's profile

Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#14 posted 01-09-2015 07:16 PM

Yes, that’s acceptable for the top… slightly hollow
jointing is acceptable. Dead-straight is fine too.

If you can’t get it right with a plane you can tape
some sandpaper to a flat surface.

For the back it’s preferable to glue the back strip
between the plates, imo. The other way is to
route a channel for it, which just makes for more
fuss.

I had one of those vises. You can certainly get by
without one if you have an assortment of clamps.

Here’s some stuff on my vacuum rig for holding a
guitar by the back. http://lumberjocks.com/Loren/blog/35682

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Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#15 posted 01-09-2015 07:23 PM

You can do it with a chisel, but braces come out
looking cleaner if shaped with a little plane. I have
a small bronze one with a curved sole. Shaving braces
is all I use it for. It’s a matter of efficiency and
making the braces look pretty only. Musically their
appearance doesn’t matter.

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