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Walnut Stump...what to do?

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Forum topic by ghazard posted 03-13-2009 07:52 PM 3412 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ghazard

382 posts in 2975 days


03-13-2009 07:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut stump resaw

I have inherited a walnut stump from my late Grandfather. It was given to him by my Uncle about 25yrs ago. The stump is native to Missouri but has been in my Grandfathers garage in Denver for roughly 25yrs. This is my first experience with trying to get project wood from a stump so I don’t know much about the strategy of resawing it. The ends have not been sealed, as I see is recommended by many here. I hope the dry Colorado climate has kept it from being ruined by moisture. At first glance it looks OK…See below. I took these pics before I left Denver a few weeks ago, of course I left without measuring it. I estimate it is roughtly 20” x 20”. I will use my local hardwood shop to resaw it for me.

Thoughts, hints, suggestions on how to handle this stump? I’m excited about the procpects of making some small gifts for my father and his siblings out of this stump that belonged to thier dad…I’d be open to suggestions on what to do with the cut stock as well.

Thanks! Greg


-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"


12 replies so far

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2128 posts in 3390 days


#1 posted 03-13-2009 09:18 PM

I love walnut, How about bowls? Write a little story about it on a card and laminate it to the bottom so future generations can read about it.

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Julian

880 posts in 2991 days


#2 posted 03-13-2009 09:26 PM

I’d saw it across the crotch, so the crotch grain will show. It will make for some wild grain that is perfect for panels, and even gunstocks.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

View oldskoolmodder's profile

oldskoolmodder

799 posts in 3146 days


#3 posted 03-13-2009 11:21 PM

We sure do grow us some goooooood Black Walnut here in Missouri! hahaha

I’d have to say that if it was me, and it’s obviously not… you would get a few nice crotch slabs out of either side for say some small end tables or what not, and still have plenty of “heartwood” left to make gunstocks or whatever you wanted with that beautiful piece of wood.

-- Respect your shop tools and they will respect you - Ric

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ghazard

382 posts in 2975 days


#4 posted 03-14-2009 01:23 AM

oldskool…So, cuta couple of crotch slabs parrallel to the ground in this picture? Just making sure I understand your suggestion.

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View cabinetmaster's profile

cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 3024 days


#5 posted 03-14-2009 01:25 AM

Bowls, bowls, bowls and more bowls….............LOL

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

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oldskoolmodder

799 posts in 3146 days


#6 posted 03-14-2009 01:31 AM

The last pic where the crotch splits off, I would cut the edges off a few inches thick, (they way your arrow indicates) and leave only the center wood, it would be like a thick slab left for whatever you desire. Of course this would leave the bark still on it, unless you take that off, but you could get more different types of projects out of this pieces that way. That’s just me though.

-- Respect your shop tools and they will respect you - Ric

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ghazard

382 posts in 2975 days


#7 posted 03-14-2009 03:48 AM

A side note…the white metal box in the upper left of the first pic is a Rockwell Mfg circular saw we found in my Grandfathers garage. It is in near perfect unused condition…We guess about late 60s early 70s. We are going to do some research to find out more about it….FUN!

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

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Boardman

157 posts in 3227 days


#8 posted 03-14-2009 03:46 PM

Have it cut straight down from the line in the picture so you’ve got a flat piece that shows both halves of the crotch. Then cut another slabs off etc. If you have a finished thickness in mind, cut it a little thicker than that, because all the internal stress in that section is going to make it react out of flat when you’re working on it.

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ghazard

382 posts in 2975 days


#9 posted 05-22-2009 10:06 PM

I am picking back up on this…I will be getting the stump this weekend. I am in the humid mid west…this stump has spent the last 25yrs in dry climate Denver.

Do I need to let the stump sit for a while before I get it cut into slabs? And then after it is cut, should I let the slabs sit before using for projects? Or try to use it right away? I plan to have it cut into 4/4 slabs.

Thanks!

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3139 days


#10 posted 05-22-2009 11:54 PM

Put an anvil on it and learn blacksmithing

View jeffthewoodwacker's profile

jeffthewoodwacker

603 posts in 3270 days


#11 posted 05-23-2009 02:56 AM

You could save it for me and I will pick it up the next time I am in Denver.

-- Those that say it can't be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

View johnpoolesc's profile

johnpoolesc

246 posts in 2826 days


#12 posted 05-23-2009 03:13 AM

since your going 4/4 i guess your not going the bowl route.. after it’s cut i would anchor seal the ends and sticker it.. wood that old should be stable.. it will pcik up humidty. so just make sure it pciks it up on both sides
the people that cut it should have suggestions for your area

-- It's not a sickness, i can stop buying tools anytime.

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