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Does wood conduct electricity?

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Forum topic by Madhurya posted 01-08-2015 02:34 PM 2866 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Madhurya

1 post in 900 days


01-08-2015 02:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: antiquefurniture furniture online india

Wood is more of an insulator than a conductor in general. However, if the wood is wet or damp the moisture can make wood a better conductor. but wood not considered as good Electrical conductor.

Even wood conducts electricity, it just depends on the amount of potential difference applied across it. At times in high tension lines even a slab of wood in contact with two phases may result in Line-Line fault.


15 replies so far

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crank49

4008 posts in 2636 days


#1 posted 01-10-2015 08:05 AM

I am confused by this post.
The title asks a question. But, then the post itself appears to be an answer.

Was this just FYI ?

For what it’s worth, I was just working yesterday in some 100KW inverters in a solar power station and the windings in the transformers were full of spacers made of wood. When dry and sealed to keep moisture out it is often used as an insulator.

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AlaskaGuy

2707 posts in 1975 days


#2 posted 01-10-2015 08:37 AM

Some people just like to talk to their self. :)

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Picklehead

1040 posts in 1595 days


#3 posted 01-10-2015 12:37 PM

What about ironwood?

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2960 posts in 3193 days


#4 posted 01-10-2015 03:09 PM

Madhurya is a spam user account related to http://www.madhurya.com. Notice the tag “furniture online india”

This text was harvested from http://www.quora.com/Does-wood-conduct-electricity and reposted here.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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TheFridge

7096 posts in 1151 days


#5 posted 01-10-2015 03:35 PM

In electrical safety classes they’ve made a point of say never grab a piece of wood to help someone who is getting shocked. But, unless it’s over 1000+ volts you could use your bare hands to pull someone away from whatever is shocking them if you don’t ground yourself as well.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Picklehead

1040 posts in 1595 days


#6 posted 01-10-2015 06:23 PM

So, Chuck, should I give up on hoping he’ll “buddy” me, or wait just a little longer? :(

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4281 posts in 2017 days


#7 posted 01-10-2015 07:08 PM

Given enough voltage just about anything is a conductor. Wood, oh yeah.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Redoak49

2506 posts in 1654 days


#8 posted 01-10-2015 07:13 PM

Don’t some moisture meters depend on conductivity?

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NoThanks

798 posts in 1194 days


#9 posted 01-10-2015 07:33 PM

My ex next door neighbor did powder coating for a living and told me that they had powder coated some wood before, but I never saw it. But it would have had to conduct electricity to work, right? (If he wasn’t story telling)
He didn’t say if they did anything previously to the wood.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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ChuckV

2960 posts in 3193 days


#10 posted 01-10-2015 07:39 PM



So, Chuck, should I give up on hoping he ll “buddy” me, or wait just a little longer? :(

- Picklehead

Picklehead,
If you want, I can send him a PM and put in a good word for you. I understand that the holidays can be a lonely time of year.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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Picklehead

1040 posts in 1595 days


#11 posted 01-10-2015 09:06 PM

If you wouldn’t mind. What with Valentine’s day coming up and all.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17950 posts in 3341 days


#12 posted 01-12-2015 12:17 AM

Just about everything will conduct if the potential is high enough ;-) We used insulators on the bone dry cedar fence posts in the high desert of Southern Idaho to maintain a good kick in the electric fence.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Craftsman on the lake

2673 posts in 3103 days


#13 posted 01-12-2015 12:41 AM

All materials conduct electricity. Some conduct almost none and others conduct nearly all of it. Just like all materials conduct heat. Metal is a good conductor, foam isn’t.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2505 posts in 2180 days


#14 posted 01-12-2015 01:26 AM

It is not the material per say, it is the minerals in the material that are actual conductors.
Pure, fresh H20 will not conduct if it is totally missing minerals to allow the electrons to flow.
But almost all water on the planet, including rainfall, contains conducting minerals which allow electron flow.

Wood over its lifetime sucks up multiple minerals from the ground as it grows. We know that as it is usually the color that the wood takes on. So it is safe to say that some wood, with moisture to help the minerals bond, will conduct. Dry wood where the minerals are not connected, cell to cell, would be more of an insulator, but certainly not guaranteed.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

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Dark_Lightning

2764 posts in 2774 days


#15 posted 01-12-2015 03:57 AM


My ex next door neighbor did powder coating for a living and told me that they had powder coated some wood before, but I never saw it. But it would have had to conduct electricity to work, right? (If he wasn t story telling)
He didn t say if they did anything previously to the wood.

- Iwud4u

If a material is a non-conductor, it can be made to have an electrical charge, and the powder coating can be applied.
If a material is a conductor, it can be isolated via a non-conductor and the powder coating can be applied.
In the photo Bondogaposis posted, the wood is most likely wet, since rain is usually accompanied by lightning, and vice-versa. /Physicist

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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