Evaporust.... reuseable?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by Charlie posted 01-07-2015 08:19 PM 784 views 1 time favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Charlie's profile


1100 posts in 1704 days

01-07-2015 08:19 PM

I had NO idea where to put this as far as which topic area, but….

I just used evaporust for the first time to derust some plane parts for a Primus 703P I’m restoring.

WONDERFUL stuff. I now have a small tray of evaporust that looks as clean as when I poured it. Can you just dump it back in the jug and use it again? Does it become less effective from sitting out for a day and a half doing its thing on rusty parts?

Or do you have to toss it?

7 replies so far

View DrDirt's profile


4135 posts in 3160 days

#1 posted 01-07-2015 08:20 PM

It does start to lose it’s effectiveness, but yes you can reuse. I try to just pour off the clear supernatant fluid and leave the sludge behind. I don’t bother trying to filter every drop.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View JayT's profile


4670 posts in 1629 days

#2 posted 01-07-2015 08:22 PM

Evaporust is reusable many times over—one of its best qualities. I’ve got some that is so black, you’d think it wouldn’t work any more, but still does. Takes a bit longer, but same results. Probably been used ten times or so.

To get the best life, filter it as you put it back in the jug.

Edit: When filtering, I do what DrDirt does. I let it settle, then pour off the top stuff and filter that. I don’t worry about the sludge, either. I tried filtering all of it the first few times, but the sludge just clogged up the filter and took way too much time.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View CyberDyneSystems's profile


219 posts in 1606 days

#3 posted 01-07-2015 08:25 PM

Yep! It’s amazing. One jug lasts a Loooooonnnng time!

-- Without the wood, it's just working

View haskins's profile


111 posts in 656 days

#4 posted 01-07-2015 09:12 PM

I found the degree of blackness of evaporust to be pretty proportional to its performance. At some point it does stop doing anything. It says it leaves a rust inhibiting film/layer but I found that is only good for the short term (days) before surface rust starts re-developing. I compared it to the electrolysis method (12 V charger, baking-soda solution with sacrificial iron) last year. Evaporust won hands down in terms of effectiveness, speed, and messiness. I did start using the electrolysis before the evaporust though just to save money (I had a lot of big rusty parts).

-- father son woodworks

View MrUnix's profile


4023 posts in 1617 days

#5 posted 01-07-2015 09:43 PM

Reusable over and over and over and over… until it just plain stops working. It does slow down as it starts to reach the end of it’s usefulness though, so it starts taking longer and longer to work (until it doesn’t).. I keep an old plastic one gallon paint can filled with the stuff out in the garage, with a wire basket inside to make dunking stuff easier to retrieve, and need to dump/refill maybe once a year or so depending on how rusty the stuff I used it on was.

I’ve even made a temporary tank, de-rusted some pretty large pieces, then just poured the stuff back in the can when done and continued using. Also works better if it’s warm.. cooler temps slow down the reaction. You can also reconstitute it if you leave it out and it evaporates down.. just add water. Also a great way to ‘stretch’ it out.. you can mix it with more water to get more volume if needed. Really some amazing stuff for being completely non-toxic and mess free.


PS: I also use electrolysis a lot, particularly on really large pieces.. but I just absolutely hate the mess it makes, so I try to use Evaporust whenever feasible.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View OSU55's profile


1039 posts in 1407 days

#6 posted 01-07-2015 09:45 PM

Do the filtering as described, and put the used evaporust in a separate container – no sense in contaminating the unused product. Just add in new as needed to cover the parts.

View johnstoneb's profile


2104 posts in 1591 days

#7 posted 01-07-2015 10:21 PM

+1 OSU55 I think adding new as makeup may help renew the used also.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics