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cutting veneers with a bandsaw

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Forum topic by stillgotallmydigits posted 01-07-2015 06:36 PM 1320 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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stillgotallmydigits

34 posts in 939 days


01-07-2015 06:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw blade question

Hi all, I am just about convinced i am inept at setting up my Rigid 14” bandsaw. If I am cutting material less than 1/2” thick everything runs just great, but if I attempt to cut thicker stuff the blade drifts all over the place, even with the fence in place. I have tightened the blade as tight as I can by hand and tried different thickness of blades with zero luck. I am bummed because the primary reason I bought this thing was to slice veneers. Any ideas would surely be appreciated!!! Thanks

-- Steve, So.Cal.


19 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6565 posts in 1611 days


#1 posted 01-07-2015 06:52 PM

Look up a video on youtube called Alex Snodgrass Bandsaw Clinic. Should get you working. You also may have a dull blade.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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shipwright

7165 posts in 2259 days


#2 posted 01-07-2015 07:33 PM

You need the right (sharp) blade, a tuned saw, and the drift accounted for.
For cost / quality ratio, I like Diamond Sterling blades but there are lots of good ones.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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jmartel

6565 posts in 1611 days


#3 posted 01-07-2015 07:38 PM

You shouldn’t have any drift with a sharp blade and proper setup. No need to account for it if it isn’t there.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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shipwright

7165 posts in 2259 days


#4 posted 01-07-2015 10:05 PM

Absolutely correct, Jeff ….. in a perfect world.
I’ve had enough surprises to hedge my bets and mention blade drift anyway.
By “accounting for it” I guess I meant having the fence set so it cuts parallel to the edge of the board. If that is dead 90, ......... nice! But if it’s 85, that’s OK too, if it’s accounted for. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1634 days


#5 posted 01-07-2015 10:18 PM

If you are cutting a lot of veneer spend the extra money and get a carbide tooth blade. Olson makes a very good one and timberslicer is an excellent one. They cut exceptionally smooth and no set. They cut straight well worth the extra money. I have the olsen I think the timberslicer might be a little bit better but is also a little more expensive.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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stillgotallmydigits

34 posts in 939 days


#6 posted 01-08-2015 06:36 PM

That’s a great video jmartel! Thanks! I will go do the setup as he described and see what I get….I’ll report back with my success or failure…:)

-- Steve, So.Cal.

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Woodbum

728 posts in 2527 days


#7 posted 01-09-2015 04:55 PM

I use Woodslicer blades from Highland Woodworking (Hardware) in Atlanta. I only use them for resawing, and never for curve cuts and they work great. I must be bandsaw challenged, because no matter how many times I set up my 14” Jet according to Michael Fortune and several others out there, I still get drift. So I finally said to hell with it, and set it up as accurately as I can and set my Carter MagFence II resaw fence cantilevered to account for the drift and I get great results every time. Go figure. Your blades must be sharp, with the set on the teeth still accurate, using a low (3-4 tpi) with big gullets for sawdust removal. Alex’s video is a good reference. The Woodslicer is pricey to some, but not nearly as pricey as a carbide blade. Just my personal opinion based on my experiences.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

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stillgotallmydigits

34 posts in 939 days


#8 posted 01-09-2015 11:12 PM

thanks for all the great tips! Well after watching that video I went down and performed all the adjustments…must say I really like the look of the ball bearing guides v. the plasticky squares on my Rigid. Anyway I managed to cut a 2” slice of maple at very slow speed and it looked pretty good. If I went faster or to a thicker matl. the blade wanted to pull in towards the fence. All I can surmise now is that I must have dulled or damaged my blade from the earlier misadjustments?

-- Steve, So.Cal.

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RT31

54 posts in 1118 days


#9 posted 01-09-2015 11:24 PM

+1 on the woodslicer Blade.

And there may or may not be something wrong with your current blade. IDK. However, it could just be that it isn’t the right blade for what you want to do.

What blade is on there now?

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stillgotallmydigits

34 posts in 939 days


#10 posted 01-09-2015 11:28 PM

I think its an Olsen…got it at Rocklers here in So. Cal. and they don’t carry cheap stuff! Can’t think of what else to do right now but try a new blade. I’ll see if I can find one o those woodslicers. Mostly I want to use this saw for resawing wood for inlays….let’s see if the new blade and proper adjustment helps!

-- Steve, So.Cal.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6565 posts in 1611 days


#11 posted 01-09-2015 11:42 PM

Woodslicer is only sold by Highland woodworking. Timberwolf blades are also very well regarded and you can find those in more places. Most likely, you are going to have to order it online somewhere.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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stillgotallmydigits

34 posts in 939 days


#12 posted 01-09-2015 11:44 PM

thanks Jmartel!!

-- Steve, So.Cal.

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spaultedsteel

7 posts in 730 days


#13 posted 01-10-2015 12:09 PM

I have the same saw and had the same goal, to cut veneer. With Carter guides and a woodslicer blade, the saw performs quite well, if you don’t push it.

-- dave,missouri, http://www.spaultedsteel.com

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spaultedsteel

7 posts in 730 days


#14 posted 01-10-2015 12:12 PM

I have the same saw and had the same goal, to cut veneer. With Carter guides and a woodslicer blade, the saw performs quite well, if you don’t push it.

-- dave,missouri, http://www.spaultedsteel.com

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

303 posts in 1923 days


#15 posted 01-10-2015 01:26 PM

I’d guess dull or poor quality blade and drift. In theory you can setup and adjust for drift, but I think it is just easier to adjust my fence for the drift. Also think about feed rate, that is a small saw, cutting hardwood veneer will be a slow steady process. Tune up the saw, and go slow… I’ve gotten 16th inch veneers easily with that saw, may have been able to go much thinner is needed.

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