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Spiral bit question

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Forum topic by Jofa posted 01-07-2015 01:06 AM 952 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jofa

272 posts in 1297 days


01-07-2015 01:06 AM

Hey guys.

Been trying to figure out the best way to use my router for cutting shapes while using guide bushings.

I made a simple rectangular template that will guide the router and I wanted to know if I should grab a straight bit or a spiral bit. If the latter, I know they have different types (up and down?).

I have a Makita palm router and I want to cut out handles in board stock.

Thanks.

-- Thank you Lord for the passion and ability to make things from your creation.


14 replies so far

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2149 days


#1 posted 01-07-2015 01:16 AM

Either will work but the spiral bits will give a cleaner cut. Upcut or downcut? I use both depending on whether the router is in the table or hand held. My goal is for the bit to pull chips out of the cut.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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jmartel

6564 posts in 1609 days


#2 posted 01-07-2015 01:16 AM

Will you be plunging the bit down into the wood or going into it from the side? If plunging, get a spiral bit. You have to make a ramped cut with a straight bit when going into the wood.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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waho6o9

7166 posts in 2036 days


#3 posted 01-07-2015 01:26 AM

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Jofa

272 posts in 1297 days


#4 posted 01-07-2015 01:52 AM

Thanks very much guys.

Basically I’m going to be doing both plunge and side cuts. I’ve found that with the straight bits I’ve had, they seem to struggle a little. I might be trying to take too much stock at one time or I’m just buying cruddy bits.

With the spiral bit, do I have to make gradual cuts or is it possible to cut, say 1/2” ply in one pass?

-- Thank you Lord for the passion and ability to make things from your creation.

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2149 days


#5 posted 01-07-2015 02:14 AM

Depending on the wood type, I take from 3/16-1/4” per pass. Probably could take more in soft woods like pine or poplar. I usually make the first pass very shallow so as to get a clean surface.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#6 posted 01-07-2015 10:28 AM

You say a “Palm” router, if which you mean one of the smaller “compact” routers that only runs a 1/4” shank bit I would really hesitate to be cutting 1/2” ply in a single pass. It’s always easier to take two or three passes than get agressive and then spend 2 to 3 times as much time fixing a “Boo-Boo”, plus the one time I snapped a 1/4” bit I nearly wet my pants

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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Jofa

272 posts in 1297 days


#7 posted 01-07-2015 03:59 PM

Dan I haven’t snapped a bit yet but I can imagine it’s a pretty scary thing.

Ok, so I found this one:

http://www.hartvilletool.com/product/3010/down-cut-standard-spiral-router-bits

This bit gets great reviews on Amazon and other sites. Price is right as well.

Thoughts?

-- Thank you Lord for the passion and ability to make things from your creation.

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pintodeluxe

4852 posts in 2272 days


#8 posted 01-07-2015 04:43 PM

I use the 1/4” spiral bits from Freud and Whiteside.
Make sure to get carbide. Believe it or not some are still made with HSS.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4448 posts in 3419 days


#9 posted 01-07-2015 05:30 PM

The carbide spiral bits are very sharp, but can tend to shatter if not used carefully. Just be aware.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Jofa

272 posts in 1297 days


#10 posted 01-07-2015 08:45 PM

Thanks guys. As always, great advice.

-- Thank you Lord for the passion and ability to make things from your creation.

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TravisH

452 posts in 1394 days


#11 posted 01-07-2015 10:38 PM

Woodsmith mag that was in the mail today suggests using end mill bits as they are cheaper and stronger. At least that was the gist from reading the picture captions. Will read the article later.

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TravisH

452 posts in 1394 days


#12 posted 01-08-2015 02:44 AM



Woodsmith mag that was in the mail today suggests using end mill bits as they are cheaper and stronger. At least that was the gist from reading the picture captions. Will read the article later.

- TravisH

Actually read the article…it was specific to mortises.

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Jofa

272 posts in 1297 days


#13 posted 01-16-2015 01:16 AM

Hey guys… update.

I got that WHITESIDE #RD2100 bit.

This is my first go round with a spiral bit so it might just be their nature but wow, what an amazing tool. I’m using my HF 1/4” guide bushing with it and this thing cuts like a hot knife through butter. I created a template for some long cutouts that are about 1” in width and used it on 3/8” birch ply. Started with a pilot hole and made the first cuts with a couple of passes. Then, tried it with one pass with my router at a speed of about 4 of 6 on the dial. No problem at all. Beautiful, clean cuts.

I should have done this earlier.

Thanks again for your guidance everyone.

-- Thank you Lord for the passion and ability to make things from your creation.

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Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 686 days


#14 posted 01-16-2015 02:12 AM

SPiral!

-- If you don't Play, you can't win

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