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Fixing slop in stub tenon/rail and stile joint

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Forum topic by ADHDan posted 01-06-2015 06:56 PM 880 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ADHDan

800 posts in 1576 days


01-06-2015 06:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m making a set of flat panels (maple frames with curly maple panels) and it looks like I miscut my stub tenons in the rails – some of them have as much as 1/16” slop, but only on one side. This means that when I fit the rails and stiles together and then force the tenon to the front of the groove, the pieces mate properly. These panels aren’t going to be doors; they’re going to be used as the sides for two little cabinets that will support a desktop.

Since the tops and bottoms of the panels won’t be visible, I think my options are: (a) measure and (try to) cut a shim the exact size of each gap for each joint; (b) cut some fairly thin and shallow wedges, and wedge/glue them into the gaps during assembly (trimming off the excess after glue-up); or© clamp the rails and stiles during assembly so that I get a good glue joint on one side of the stub tenon, and hope that’s good enough.

I don’t see the last option leading to a good result, so I’m wondering whether I can get away with using shallow wedges as shims (option b) instead of cutting each shim to fit (option a). Thoughts?

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.


5 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1819 days


#1 posted 01-06-2015 07:18 PM

Cut some thin slightly oversize shims for the tenons and glue them in place, then trim them to fit slowly and carefully w/ a shoulder plane.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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hotbyte

844 posts in 2443 days


#2 posted 01-06-2015 07:24 PM

Could you cut off the tenon, mortise end of rails and use loose tenon? Never seen a loose stub tenon…

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#3 posted 01-06-2015 07:27 PM

I think what you want to do (B) will work just fine, but I prefer Bondo’s approach. Glue some more stock on, and trim it down.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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ADHDan

800 posts in 1576 days


#4 posted 01-06-2015 07:39 PM

Ok yeah that makes sense. I don’t have a shoulder plane (and never really use a hand plane) but I don’t see why I couldn’t just cut a bunch of thin blanks to glue to the back of each tenon, and then run that side of the tenon over a dado blade or router bit. That would get the same result as (a) without measuring each specific gap.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#5 posted 01-06-2015 07:44 PM

Indeed it would, or just use a chisel if you have one handy.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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