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glass version of breadboard door

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Forum topic by Vjeko posted 03-09-2009 04:58 PM 1374 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Vjeko

135 posts in 2875 days


03-09-2009 04:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m tossing between a few different door styles for the
kitchen and then I cam across the breadboard style
the door on the hanging cupboard:
http://www.samclarkdesign.com/cabinets_3.htm

Just wondering how is the glass version of this door made ?

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia


10 replies so far

View Steelmum's profile

Steelmum

355 posts in 3423 days


#1 posted 03-09-2009 05:48 PM

When I worked at a large cabinet factory that door was made by just adding the glass in a frame like you would a window. Silicone caulk served as the ‘glazing’.

-- Berta in NC

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Vjeko

135 posts in 2875 days


#2 posted 03-09-2009 06:40 PM

Berta, the thing is I was thnking of how to keep the flat style (without frames), so I guess you would breadboard stiles which have dadoes and put in glass beforehand (silicon in dadoes) – was wondering whether the door would be structurally strong enough.

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 3335 days


#3 posted 03-09-2009 07:05 PM

So we are clear about what you are asking … you want the glass to be flush with the front surface of the breadboard rails?

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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Vjeko

135 posts in 2875 days


#4 posted 03-09-2009 07:16 PM

Hi Peter,
I wanted to know how to make the same looking door as per link but just with glass in it
i.e. adding frames etc would make the door look out of place/not the same style.
And I wasn’t sure how to do it mainly as we now have the stiles under the
rail and am uncertain of strength of the structure once you add the glass.

Regarding the glass being flush with the front – I guess I’m not sure how
the glass should be to give the same style (maybe insetting it as per normal
wouldn’t detract from the looks , but flat with face would seem to
give it the modern look – maybe someone who has made more doors
could comment also on the aesthetic perspective)

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

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Vjeko

135 posts in 2875 days


#5 posted 03-10-2009 09:27 AM

Since there’s no takers on my long reply, let me start with a short question
in line with what Peter was saying – how would you make a version
of the door with glass flush with the outside face ?

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

View Steelmum's profile

Steelmum

355 posts in 3423 days


#6 posted 03-10-2009 02:50 PM

The very first picture, all glass?? No wood? Take the idea with picture to a glass shop.

-- Berta in NC

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Vjeko

135 posts in 2875 days


#7 posted 03-10-2009 03:16 PM

No just the insert glass, the rest still wood same look as door

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 3335 days


#8 posted 03-10-2009 03:30 PM

Okay, I think I know what you are asking.

I’ve done cabinets with breadboard doors and glass doors together, and I just did traditional frame-and-panel glass doors and I don’t think they looked out of place. To maintain the breadboard look, you could make the horizontal pieces of the glass door frame come all the way to the edge, and make the vertical pieces of the frame run in between (horizontal stiles, vertical rails). If that doesn’t make sense, let me know and I’ll do a sketch of what I’m talking about.

There are also glass door hinges available. You could use tempered glass with glass door hinges for the door, and just apply a wooden top and bottom strip to create the breadboard look.

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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Vjeko

135 posts in 2875 days


#9 posted 03-10-2009 03:55 PM

OK, and for the solution where the horizontal pieces run all the way would
loose tenon joinery work with tenons vertical (wasn’t sure the door frame
would be as strong as tenons horizontal and would come out of square
with time)

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 3335 days


#10 posted 03-10-2009 04:16 PM

I don’t think the joints would be any weaker if the tenons are vertical instead of horizontal. I don’t do much with loose tenons, but it should work.

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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