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After Market Thicness Gauge for DW735

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Forum topic by bbc557ci posted 01-05-2015 10:49 PM 905 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbc557ci

593 posts in 1705 days


01-05-2015 10:49 PM

Hi all. Been a while since I last posted… always busy, generally too busy to get much done in the shop :o/

Anyways… I’m in the process of planing down about 450 BF of Ash. It’s rough cut and of various lengths and widths. Quite some time ago thought I read here on LJs about an after market thickness gauge that was highly thought of by those who have/use them. My goal is to get the final thickness of the Ash the same (or as close as possible) on all pieces. Anyone have any info or maybe a link to that critter ?? Any help is appreciated.

Thanks in advance !!

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"


10 replies so far

View JayT's profile

JayT

5245 posts in 1842 days


#1 posted 01-05-2015 10:52 PM

Not sure which one you read about before, but the Wixey digital planer gauge is generally pretty well thought of.

Edit: There are several reviews here on LJ with more info.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2563 posts in 1907 days


#2 posted 01-05-2015 11:13 PM


Not sure which one you read about before, but the Wixey digital planer gauge is generally pretty well thought of.

Edit: There are several reviews here on LJ with more info.

- JayT


v
v
I got one and think it’s a great gadget. Easy to install and accurate

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5204 posts in 2444 days


#3 posted 01-05-2015 11:59 PM

Let me know if you see any advantage with the Wixey. I have been pretty happy with the Dewalt factory depth stops on the 735. I guess the Wixey would add some flexibility to the 6 preset stops on the 735.
When not using the depth stop, the Dewalt thickness gauge is pretty hard to read.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

7069 posts in 1781 days


#4 posted 01-06-2015 12:31 AM

I can also attest to excellent customer service from Wixey. I recently contacted them to get a few extra parts for my planer gauge and they came through extremely quickly.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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bbc557ci

593 posts in 1705 days


#5 posted 01-09-2015 11:06 PM

Thanks for the feedback, and links. ‘nuther question…. I expect once the unit is mounted it will need to be calibrated, not a problem. Now, if I stop planning the Ash and then don’t get back at it for a week or two, do I need to fuss around or re-calibrate it to again to get it back to the finished thickness?

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2563 posts in 1907 days


#6 posted 01-09-2015 11:15 PM


Thanks for the feedback, and links. nuther question…. I expect once the unit is mounted it will need to be calibrated, not a problem. Now, if I stop planning the Ash and then don t get back at it for a week or two, do I need to fuss around or re-calibrate it to again to get it back to the finished thickness?

- bbc557ci


v
v
Once it’s calibrated…that’s it. You can return after a week or two (or whenever) and it remains calibrated.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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bbc557ci

593 posts in 1705 days


#7 posted 01-09-2015 11:18 PM

Thanks kdc. That’s what I was hoping for :o)

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

7069 posts in 1781 days


#8 posted 01-09-2015 11:43 PM

It’s super easy to calibrate anyway. Just send a piece through, put it under the plunger without changing the height of the planer, hold calibrate, it’ll say 0, and then you’re done.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

756 posts in 1583 days


#9 posted 01-09-2015 11:44 PM

I do not know how the switches on the Wixey planer gauge function. I have thought about springing for one, but not just yet. I do have a Wixey Digital Angle gauge. It is fantastic, with one exception. I do not use it very often. It turns out (for my version at least, they may have changed this) the On/Off switch just turns the display on and off. The battery is still powering the unit and is draining 24/7. I asked Wixey about this and they indicated that this was by design so the unit could store the zero entry. I am not certain why you would want that unless every tool in your shop is dead level with the world. My tools are about as level as I can get them, but the Wixey tells me they are not all the same and I believe it. I want to know how fences and blades are positioned relative to the table on a specific tool. It takes one push of the button to reset the zero for the tool table and then we are OK for angles. I would always do this even if I thought the unit had stored the zero value for that tool.

I discovered this “feature” when my gauge ran the battery down a lot faster than I thought it should. I now take the battery out after every use. A pain, but I guess I have to do it. The addition of a master On/Off switch would be a nice modification. My apologies to Wixey if I have this wrong, but this is what I was told when I inquired and it is my experience.

For a single function gauge like a depth gauge for a planer the “always of for memory” might be useful, but for the angle gauge I wish the On/Off switch actually turned the gauge off.

Actually, any gauge, whether it is the one on the planer, a Wixey, or a nice caliper on the finished product will have some potential for error. Probably not enough to worry about in the final analysis of assembly and sanding, but if I want to be absolutely certain that all of the pieces for a project are the same thickness I run all of them through the planer for the final pass without any adjustments.

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MrUnix

5200 posts in 1830 days


#10 posted 01-10-2015 12:12 AM

if I want to be absolutely certain that all of the pieces for a project are the same thickness I run all of them through the planer for the final pass without any adjustments.

Same here.. and a cheap pair of callipers to verify they are the thickness I want is all that is required.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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