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Pits in poly after first coat on shuffleboard

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Forum topic by mayhem69 posted 01-04-2015 04:42 PM 1369 views 0 times favorited 49 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mayhem69

23 posts in 702 days


01-04-2015 04:42 PM

Hi, im refinishing a 12ft. maple shuffleboard, i sanded the crap out of it, applied sanding sealer, wiped down with damp rag, applied oil based Minwax poly. When applying a saw several pits in the finish, i could not get the poly to cover it up. What can i do when it drys? hoping i can just block sand and try to put another coat on and it will fill.


49 replies so far

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2105 days


#1 posted 01-04-2015 05:09 PM

Appears that a several things could be the problem assuming the sanding sealer was dry and the surface after sanding was cleared of any wax:

1. You didn’t make sure the surface was dry after you wiped it with the damp rag prior to applying the Minwax poly.

2. There was some sort of contaminate on the wet rag that transfered to the surface during the wiping.

3. You may have had some holidays in the sanding sealer coverage.

Just to mention a few, but my best quess is #1.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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mayhem69

23 posts in 702 days


#2 posted 01-04-2015 05:19 PM

thanks pjones, you might be right, anyway i sanded down with 320, wiped with paint thinner on rag, hoping i can cover this up with next app. with no bubbles
thank you for your time! I thought this was going to be a fun project, but so far far from it!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4219 posts in 1661 days


#3 posted 01-04-2015 05:26 PM

For a shuffleboard, you are going to want a lot more than just one coat of poly so it can stand up to the abuse. It also helps if you thin the poly a bit to help it flow out better and discourage bubbles.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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mayhem69

23 posts in 702 days


#4 posted 01-04-2015 06:39 PM

hi Brad, yes i understand i will need several coats, i just applied second coat and getting bubbles and pits, i just dont know what im doing wrong! i wiped it all down with thinner and rag, applied with good natural bristle brush.
I had alot more “bare spots” this time after i cleaned with the thinner rag. they are all over! i thought the first coat looked not that great, but the second coat is worse!
HELP!!

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pjones46

986 posts in 2105 days


#5 posted 01-04-2015 06:58 PM

How old is the poly? At what temp is the poly and the room you are applying the poly? Did you wipe off the thinner with a paper towel and let it flash off? Has the thinner been contaminated or the wrong thinner?

This may sound stupid, but several noted finishers say to wash the surface with a very mild dish soap ( Dawn) and water solution as it removes any oils on the surface, then rinse with clean water wiping off with paper towels to dry.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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mayhem69

23 posts in 702 days


#6 posted 01-04-2015 07:21 PM

the poly is new from HD, applying in my dining room at 75 degrees, yes i wiped it with clean cloth, just bought the thinner from walmart
i am cleaning the brush with mineral spirits also.
do you think it might be too late to go further on in the project? or do i have to strip and start all over again, which probably entails me paying for someone to do this, because i cant take it anymore!

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pjones46

986 posts in 2105 days


#7 posted 01-04-2015 07:29 PM

Make sure the cloth is 100% cotton and not a blend.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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mayhem69

23 posts in 702 days


#8 posted 01-04-2015 07:30 PM


Make sure the cloth is 100% cotton and not a blend.

- pjones46

cloth is 100% cotton, just cut up old shirt of mine
do you think it could be from the washing detergent that the shirt was washed in?

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1950 days


#9 posted 01-04-2015 07:37 PM

Just a note here, but traditionally, shuffle boards were finished with lacquer. Don’t worry about it wearing through quickly, some from the 40’s and 50’s are still going strong.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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mayhem69

23 posts in 702 days


#10 posted 01-04-2015 07:40 PM



Just a note here, but traditionally, shuffle boards were finished with lacquer. Don t worry about it wearing through quickly, some from the 40 s and 50 s are still going strong.

- Dallas


yes i know this, but when i bought this one, someone else screwed the top up, contaminated , had to be stripped down!

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pjones46

986 posts in 2105 days


#11 posted 01-04-2015 07:49 PM

Make sure the cloth is 100% cotton and not a blend.

- pjones46

cloth is 100% cotton, just cut up old shirt of mine
do you think it could be from the washing detergent that the shirt was washed in?

- mayhem69


Could be, anything is possible. Thats why I use paper towels. The only thing I can think of now is to use a barrier coat of dewaxed shellac after sanding what you have already and before you put on another coat of poly.

Just plain weird.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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mayhem69

23 posts in 702 days


#12 posted 01-04-2015 07:54 PM


Make sure the cloth is 100% cotton and not a blend.

- pjones46

cloth is 100% cotton, just cut up old shirt of mine
do you think it could be from the washing detergent that the shirt was washed in?

- mayhem69

Could be, anything is possible. Thats why I use paper towels.

- pjones46


after 2 coats of poly do you think this project is ruined? or can i still try to sand after the poly drys and wipe with thinner and paper towels?

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MrUnix

4219 posts in 1661 days


#13 posted 01-04-2015 08:02 PM

Hardly ruined.. if nothing else, you can sand back down and start over.. although I doubt that is necessary. You need to figure out what the ‘pits’ are being caused by.. if it’s the wood soaking up more than surrounding areas (pores in the wood), you just need to keep applying until they fill up and stop acting like a sponge. Lay down a coat, let dry, sand and repeat until you get enough of a build up.

Bubbles on the other hand is completely within your control. Thinning helps, as does ‘tipping’ with a dry brush after laying down a coat. Larger bubbles can be pricked with a needle or other suitable implement if needed.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Poly is my preferred finish and I use it on pretty much everything.. although I prefer to make my own wipe-on poly so I don’t have a long wait time between coats and it flows out really nice. There is a pretty steep learning curve with it though.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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mayhem69

23 posts in 702 days


#14 posted 01-04-2015 08:09 PM


Hardly ruined.. if nothing else, you can sand back down and start over.. although I doubt that is necessary. You need to figure out what the pits are being caused by.. if it s the wood soaking up more than surrounding areas (pores in the wood), you just need to keep applying until they fill up and stop acting like a sponge. Lay down a coat, let dry, sand and repeat until you get enough of a build up.

Bubbles on the other hand is completely within your control. Thinning helps, as does tipping with a dry brush after laying down a coat. Larger bubbles can be pricked with a needle or other suitable implement if needed.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Poly is my preferred finish and I use it on pretty much everything.. although I prefer to make my own wipe-on poly so I don t have a long wait time between coats and it flows out really nice. There is a pretty steep learning curve with it though.

- MrUnix


hi brad, i forgot to mention i have vinyl #’s, 1,2,3 and lines laid down, so i have to sand around this. You mention acting like a sponge, this is exactly what the top looks like, little craters all over. do you recommend using the diluted dawn dish liquid to clean instead of thinner? after sanding? Also, what is tipping? please explain?

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MrUnix

4219 posts in 1661 days


#15 posted 01-04-2015 08:37 PM

Never tried dish soap.. not sure I would want to try either :)

I just dampen a paper towel with some MS to wipe up any sanding residue.. and then let it completely flash off before applying the poly. Other methods will work.. that is just what I found works best for me.

If it’s the wood soaking up the finish in those spots, then you just have to keep applying until it stops. Probably not necessary to sand between coats either. Sanding is really only needed before your finish coat or two to remove any dust nibs and knock down any high spots.

Cheers,
Brad

Oh, tipping.. it’s just using a dry brush to lightly (very, very lightly!) go over the freshly laid finish to pop the bubbles. I’m sure if you do a google search you will find lots of info and videos on the subject.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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