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Forum topic by knexster posted 01-04-2015 01:01 AM 1132 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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knexster

33 posts in 750 days


01-04-2015 01:01 AM

I went to a local micro brewery for dinner tonight and was considering the possibly of recreating the tables they have for my own dinner table. My wife loves the idea and it looks petty straight forward, but being new to woodworking I thought I’d ask a few questions.
Judging by these photos what kind of wood do you think this is?

Is this realistic for me to complete with a table saw, miter saw, and orbital sander? Or will I likely need a tool I don’t have?

Also, if you are in the St. Louis area, Urban Chestnut is not only an amazing beer (particularly the Schnickelfritze hefeweizen), but their Grove location beer hall has amazingly authentic German food.

-- Don't think outside the box. The box was never there.


6 replies so far

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1753 days


#1 posted 01-04-2015 01:37 AM

You’ll need clamps, I recommend bar clamps. They are economical, do a good job and are versatile. You’ll need a nice big flat strong surface to glue up the boards. I can’t tell exactly what kind of wood it is, but from the knots and marks, I’d guess pine with a dark stain.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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knexster

33 posts in 750 days


#2 posted 01-06-2015 01:37 PM



You ll need clamps, I recommend bar clamps. They are economical, do a good job and are versatile. You ll need a nice big flat strong surface to glue up the boards. I can t tell exactly what kind of wood it is, but from the knots and marks, I d guess pine with a dark stain.

- RussellAP

I am certainly stocking up on clamps as I do more and more projects. This wood seemed really heavy, in my limited experience I have not come across pine this heavy. Then again, It was pretty thick so it’s size in general could be why it was so heavy.

To ensure a flat even surface, will I need to look into getting a jointer? If so I may be waiting on this project.

-- Don't think outside the box. The box was never there.

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bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1818 days


#3 posted 01-06-2015 01:48 PM

A jack plane would be handy too, for leveling the top.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1753 days


#4 posted 01-06-2015 03:24 PM

Of all the tools I have, and I pretty much have them all, the joiner is the least used. If I need to glue up boards I just straightline rip them on the TS. It’s easier and in most cases when using pine, there is no tear-out.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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knexster

33 posts in 750 days


#5 posted 01-07-2015 03:44 AM



Of all the tools I have, and I pretty much have them all, the joiner is the least used. If I need to glue up boards I just straightline rip them on the TS. It s easier and in most cases when using pine, there is no tear-out.

- RussellAP

I’m not sure I could manage a 6ft long board going through my TS without having something go wrong lol.

-- Don't think outside the box. The box was never there.

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#6 posted 01-07-2015 06:11 AM

That’s a pretty big challenge for a new woodworker. I built one from hard maple. Took two people to lift it…and a lot of real estate to assemble. Five boards glue up two at a time and three. It was a struggle, and heck to sand smooth.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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