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Delta 36-725 Table Saw

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Forum topic by patrick04 posted 01-02-2015 05:42 PM 7462 views 0 times favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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patrick04

9 posts in 707 days


01-02-2015 05:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw

I’m a beginning woodworker and will be purchasing my first table saw soon. I am strongly leaning toward the Delta 36-725 because of its price, features, and its ability to be moved/rolled to new locations easily. Are there any other saws in this price range that I should consider? I want to buy new because I’m not experienced enough to assess the quality of a used table saw, and my budget is in the $500 to $700 range.

The only major requirement is that I am able to roll the table saw out of my garage into my driveway to use it (I have no dust collection system in my garage and I want to keep it clean because it’s basically a storage area for now). My driveway has a slight slope toward the main road but I think/hope it will be okay to use a table saw on it. I know it’s not a perfect situation, but it’s what I have to work with.

Besides that, I am just looking for the “best” table saw for making things like bookshelves, tables, and cabinets. I will probably only make a few projects per year, but I enjoy good tools and want to make sure I get a table saw that won’t make me wish I had spent a few more dollars for a better one.

I was also considering job site saws (especially the DeWalt DWE 7491RS). The main advantage of a job site saw for my purposes is that it would take up less storage space in my garage. However, since I don’t need true portability, I am thinking that job site saws are not a good option for me.

As far as specific questions go, I am wondering what I can do with the Delta 36-725 that I wouldn’t be able to do with a job site saw. And I’m wondering if there is anything better than the Delta 36-725 in the same price range that I would still be able to easily roll into my driveway.


33 replies so far

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2842 days


#1 posted 01-02-2015 06:36 PM

The Delta 36-725 is a full size cast iron saw with a belt drive induction motor. It has a nice larger surface area and a decent fence. The larger saws tend to have the lion’s share of the advantages. They’re much heavier and more stable, have more torque, less vibration, and are much quieter. The extra surface area in front of the blade is safer and easier to get accurate cuts from. The upgrade potential of a full size saw is much better too….items like wings, fences, miter gauges are easy to upgrade. Full size saws are also more reliable, plus tend to be more feasible to fix should something go wrong. You’re also less likely to outgrow the larger saw. Simply put, if you don’t need to lug it from one place to the next, go with the bigger saw….you’re not likely to ever regret having more working surface and capacity.

The ABCs of Table Saws

Tips for Picking Saw Blades

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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patrick04

9 posts in 707 days


#2 posted 01-02-2015 07:51 PM

Thanks for the reply and info!

Do you happen to know if the fence rails (not sure if that’s what they’re called) on the Delta 36-725 are easily foldable or collapsable in any way for storage? It looks like the saw table is about 3’ wide but the rails extend a total of about 5’.

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epimetheus

2 posts in 995 days


#3 posted 01-02-2015 07:55 PM

No, the rails are not collapsible. I just finished assembling my 36-725 and I have to say, other than vague assembly instructions, i’m very happy with the fit and finish of the saw for the price.

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WhyMe

616 posts in 1027 days


#4 posted 01-02-2015 09:47 PM

I have the Delta 36-725 and is does take up some room and is not collapsible by any means. If you have not searched for the “Delta 36-725” on Lumberjocks here’s a long thread on it. http://lumberjocks.com/replies/on/2711572

And a review…. http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3881

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runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1491 days


#5 posted 01-02-2015 10:39 PM

If you don’t need the longer rails, they aren’t hard to cut off.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1008 days


#6 posted 01-02-2015 11:27 PM

I’ve had mine about a year. It’s the best for a hobbiest in the price range. Get a thin kerf blade and never look back.

-- I know you know...

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patrick04

9 posts in 707 days


#7 posted 01-03-2015 02:29 PM

It sounds like the Delta is the way to go. Thanks all very much.

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Rayne

470 posts in 1006 days


#8 posted 01-03-2015 06:17 PM

Ask your local Lowes if they’ll accept a Harbor Freight coupon. Some do and some don’t. It might help save more money just as it did for me.

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patrick04

9 posts in 707 days


#9 posted 01-04-2015 12:31 AM

Well… After I made a decision to get the Delta, I made the mistake of doing more research and ran across the Rousseau tables for portable table saws. If I combine a Rousseau table with one of the higher-end portable saws (Bosch, DeWalt, Makita), what would I be missing compared to the Delta 36-725?

The main advantage of a Rousseau w/portable table saw for me would be space savings for storage. (I have space for the Delta right now, but I like to conserve space when possible for other tools and items that I might acquire in the future.)

I understand the motor is one big difference, but what else? Remember I am new to table saws so I don’t know what features might be missing from the portable/job site saws that would be available on larger saws like the Delta 36-725.

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2842 days


#10 posted 01-04-2015 01:38 AM


Well… After I made a decision to get the Delta, I made the mistake of doing more research and ran across the Rousseau tables for portable table saws. If I combine a Rousseau table with one of the higher-end portable saws (Bosch, DeWalt, Makita), what would I be missing compared to the Delta 36-725?

The main advantage of a Rousseau w/portable table saw for me would be space savings for storage. (I have space for the Delta right now, but I like to conserve space when possible for other tools and items that I might acquire in the future.)

I understand the motor is one big difference, but what else? Remember I am new to table saws so I don t know what features might be missing from the portable/job site saws that would be available on larger saws like the Delta 36-725.

- patrick04

All the disadvantages of a smaller saw still exist….the space in front of the blade, torque, noise, reliability, upgradeability, feasibility to repair, etc. You’ll gain legs, you might get a better fence, but that’s debatable….you’ll definitely spend some more money on the Rousseau.

some reading on table saws

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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wildbill001

111 posts in 2108 days


#11 posted 01-04-2015 04:24 AM

I too am looking at getting a 36-725 but have a couple of questions that I have yet to see asked anywhere else. So, without trying to hi-jack the thread, here goes:

1) The front rail is longer than the back rail. Any particular reason why? Looks like the only reason I can see is so that a router could be mounted between the rails.

2) I will be working out of my new garage so being able to roll it around is a big plus. However, there is about a 1-1.5” drop between the garage floor and the driveway. Anyone think that will be a problem getting it up and down that? Is it possible/easy to add larger wheels/casters?

Thanks in advance.

Bill W

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown

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MikesProjects

163 posts in 1368 days


#12 posted 01-04-2015 08:22 AM

The Rousseau may be the way to go but the makita imo is great with the Rousseau stand however it will cost a whole lot of money if buying all that new. I used the Rousseau stand- makita set up with outfeed table while installing millwork in the field lots of times, very durable, reliable & accurate. It collapses down to fit in a truck easily & really is easy to set up.

If you want a nice saw that doesent take up lots of space may i suggest the dewalt 744, they just came out with a newer version but it really is a good saw & very accurate. Also has a cool rack & pinion fence system & comes with a stand, you can make a outfeed table or get a folding table & trim the legs to match the height of the saw & stand. also the dewalt has a dust port you can hook a vaccume to to collect dust as does the makita. The dewalt fence extends out to something like 26” now. If your just starting out.

Okay i just reread your post & you mention the dewallt, i highly recommend that saw, I have all the big brand job saws & it is great. I make & build whatever my heart craves with out a big shop saw & i’m an actual carpenter with almost 20 years experience, 25 if you count growing up in my dads work shop ;)
good luck.

-- -Mike, Southern California, YouTube User ( Give & Take )

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Woodmaster1

738 posts in 2053 days


#13 posted 01-04-2015 10:14 AM

Get the delta a you will be happy down the road. You will become hooked on woodworking and the Delta will be a better choice for the future.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2842 days


#14 posted 01-04-2015 01:25 PM



I too am looking at getting a 36-725 but have a couple of questions that I have yet to see asked anywhere else. So, without trying to hi-jack the thread, here goes:

1) The front rail is longer than the back rail. Any particular reason why? Looks like the only reason I can see is so that a router could be mounted between the rails.

- wildbill001

The front rails accommodate the width of the head of the t-square, so need to be longer than the back rails….true of most fences and rails.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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patrick04

9 posts in 707 days


#15 posted 01-04-2015 03:15 PM

Thanks for the positive review for the Rousseau table, Mike. I’m glad to hear it might be a good option.

It turns out that my local Lowe’s doesn’t stock or sell the Delta 36-725, and with tax and truck delivery to my area from the next nearest Lowe’s it would cost well over $700 anyway.

Has anyone bought major tools like this from online sellers? For some reason I can’t find the 36-725 online, but I can find the 36-5xxx series saws. For example, I noticed that the toolbarn.com has the Delta 36-5000 for $950 with free shipping and (I assume) no tax. Are the 5xxx series saws worth the extra money?

The other option locally for a similar saw would be the Masterforce 2400037 at Menards, which I’ve heard is the same saw as the Ridgid R4512. It sells for $600. I am wary of the alignment issues though…

p.s. I am also curious about Bill’s question regarding the 1-1.5” drop from garage to driveway. I have a similar but smaller bump (0.5”) to navigate.

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