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Forum topic by GrandFX posted 03-04-2009 02:59 AM 2323 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GrandFX

4 posts in 2832 days


03-04-2009 02:59 AM

I just bought a #605 bedrock plane off of Ebay. The plane is beautiful with a clean tote, frog, cap, and blade, and 95% Japanning. The sides of the plane are almost perfect. Then you get to the bottom which looks like a small war broke out on its surface. Deep, ubiquitous pitting all over. I feel the pitting is so deep, that if I try to machine the surface, it will open up the throat too much (based on what I’ve read in other posts). My suggestion might seem blasphemous, but it’s the only solution I can think of… Has anyone ever tried to cover a pitted surface of a plane with epoxy and then sand it back down to a smooth surface?


10 replies so far

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

938 posts in 2854 days


#1 posted 03-04-2009 04:17 AM

Was the damage described by the seller at the Item description?

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3109 days


#2 posted 03-04-2009 04:27 AM

got pic?

depending on how bad the pitting is, it might not even be necessary to put much effort in fixing them, it’s a Jack Plane, and merely needs to be flat along a line of 3 points – front of toe, mouth, and back of heel, if there are pitting in between it’s not a big deal – depending on how bad they are of course… a picture here would help us see the severity of the situation and provide suggestion that would fit the situation more properly.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View treeman's profile

treeman

208 posts in 2910 days


#3 posted 03-04-2009 04:28 AM

Depending on where the pitting is located it may or may not affect the function of the plane. Many planes have corregated soles which are basically intentional pitting of the sole. As long as the area around the mouth is clean or can be cleaned up and the toe and heel aren’t too bad, you may be OK. Over the buk of the sole some pitting shouldn’t hurt the plane too much as long as you can get the areas between the pits smooth and flat and have enough contact area between the pitting.

View Cam's profile

Cam

20 posts in 2839 days


#4 posted 03-04-2009 04:31 AM

Take this advice with a grain of salt seeing as I am still a novice woodworker. From my research and knowledge on handplanes I would say that taking the sole down enough to remove the pits would open the throat. As far as I know that would not be a problem because of the adjustable frog. The only way that would be a problem is with a wooden bodied handplane where the blade is not adjustable from front to back making the throat too large for anything more than suitable for deep cuts. As for the epoxy idea, I would not like the looks of that on my plane. (just keep the sole down when you have guests over) I’m not so sure the epoxy would wear at the same rate as the cast iron of the body. Does anyone see pits as real problem anyway??

View Loren's profile

Loren

8295 posts in 3109 days


#5 posted 03-04-2009 04:32 AM

I’ve had some planes with pitted soles and as far as I can tell
they work just as good. Really deep pitting could lead to chipping
of the mouth enough that you wouldn’t want to use the plane,
but other than that I wouldn’t anticipate problems from using
a plane with a pitted sole.

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GrandFX

4 posts in 2832 days


#6 posted 03-04-2009 05:49 AM

Thanks for the feedback. I didn’t even consider the correlation with corregated soles. Sadly, the seller said nothing about the sole being messed up when he posted it on ebay. He only showed pics from the top. I can’t complain. As a buyer, I should have asked more questions. I feel the blame lies on both sides of the deal. Anyway, here are some pics of the plane.

Bedrock 605 Main

Bedrock 605 Sole 3

Bedrock 605 Sole 1

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

242 posts in 3207 days


#7 posted 03-04-2009 05:50 AM

I just repaired a #5 with a similar issue. The first step was to soak it overnight in Evapo-Rust. That product is incredible. After a thorough rinsing and drying, I used Bondo (automotive body filler). I mixed a little Bondo, spread it into the pitted areas, then reversed the direction and worked it in a little more to make sure all of the pores were filled. The open time of Bondo is 2-3 minutes. After 30 minutes, I sanded it smooth and oiled the entire palne with Camelia oil. The sole is as smooth a glass (of course it now has pinnk splotches – the bondo is a light pinkish color).

-- NorthWoodsMan

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

938 posts in 2854 days


#8 posted 03-04-2009 06:08 AM

Nooooo!. That’s a misrepresentation of an item, start inmediately a claim with PAYPAL Resolution Center!!!!!!
I have been in situations like this before, the last one yesterday, take a look:
http://lumberjocks.com/jocks/Doubthead/blog/7706

All my money was refunded, including both shippings. We (Ebay users) must stop the fraud!!!

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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GrandFX

4 posts in 2832 days


#9 posted 03-04-2009 07:37 AM

Henry, I took your advise. Especially when I went back and re-read the description. “All metal with wooden handles in excellent working condition, very clean with no damage of any kind and very well preserved”. I have received two bad planes in the past month, so this guy gets to pay the price.

Based on my experience with bondo, NorthWoodsMan’s suggestion sounds very easy, but I am not sure if I can bring myself to pinkify my Bedrock. I had hoped to use a clear epoxy as not to visually scar the surface. I may consider the bondo idea on one of my other planes I have similar issues with and don’t ever use anymore. Thanks.

View Handidad's profile

Handidad

27 posts in 2835 days


#10 posted 03-05-2009 04:05 AM

JB Weld is a silver coloured epoxy that they clai can be drilled and tapped. This ight be better than bondo.

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