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Spindle turning

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Forum topic by MrRon posted 01-01-2015 05:22 PM 860 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


01-01-2015 05:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question lathe turning

I would like to make some spindles for a baby crib. I am going to use Poplar dowels. I don’t have a lathe duplicator, so is there a way I can turn about 25 spindles and have them all come out the same? Also does anyone know how to put a tenon on each end of each spindle, all the same? I probably will need a jig to do it. I know I can buy spindles, but they would add to the cost considerably.
Is Poplar good enough for making clean spindles or is there a better wood I should use?


6 replies so far

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DaleM

952 posts in 2849 days


#1 posted 01-01-2015 05:33 PM

Make a story stick with all your measurements on it and have calipers ready. Several calipers work better so you don’t have to keep adjusting. I just do the tenon the same as anything else. Just get it close with a gouge and then finish it off with a skew chisel to flatten it out. You can even use a wrench as your caliper; just match it to your drill bit for the mortise. Here’s a good article that shows a good story stick. http://www.craftsy.com/blog/?p=133757&ext=FB_WWC_LP_Blog_blog8_2014-12-27&utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social%20Engagement&utm_campaign=Woodworking%20Club-Registrations&initialPage=true

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

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dannelson

181 posts in 1836 days


#2 posted 01-01-2015 05:44 PM

put an indexer on your cnc and push play

-- nelson woodcrafters

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3128 days


#3 posted 01-01-2015 06:26 PM

Also does anyone know how to put a tenon on each end of each spindle, all the same?

I made a set of tenon-making tools. I bought a set of open-end wrenches at Harbor Freight, and ground the short side of the wrench to create a sharp cutting edge.
Turn the blank to round and a bit over size, then put the wrench (long side down) under the blank and push in. I get a perfectly sized tenon every time.

Is Poplar good enough for making clean spindles or is there a better wood I should use?

Unless you have specific finishing requirements, poplar would be the correct choice, It is stable, turns well, and takes paint well.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


#4 posted 01-01-2015 11:25 PM



Make a story stick with all your measurements on it and have calipers ready. Several calipers work better so you don t have to keep adjusting. I just do the tenon the same as anything else. Just get it close with a gouge and then finish it off with a skew chisel to flatten it out. You can even use a wrench as your caliper; just match it to your drill bit for the mortise. Here s a good article that shows a good story stick. http://www.craftsy.com/blog/?p=133757&ext=FB_WWC_LP_Blog_blog8_2014-12-27&utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social%20Engagement&utm_campaign=Woodworking%20Club-Registrations&initialPage=true
Thanks for the link. The wrench is a good idea.

- DaleM


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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#5 posted 01-02-2015 08:34 AM

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lew

11340 posts in 3220 days


#6 posted 01-02-2015 04:04 PM

Gerry is right on with the spindle “caliper”. You can use just the open end wrench as is until you get a spare set to modify. I usually make a full size drawing of the turning with the transitions marked, then position the drawing (story stick) close to the turned piece

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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