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Scary Sharp Method - Automated?

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Forum topic by BigFoot Products Canada posted 1972 days ago 2382 views 2 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BigFoot Products Canada

620 posts in 1992 days


1972 days ago

Has anyone designed an automated system for the Scary Sharp method of sharpening?
If so what?
The reason I’m asking is I am in the final stages of a design that does just that. I will be posting it real soon.
I own the Worksharp 3000 and a Wet wheel system. I’ve made my own system very similar to the Tormek and now I’m tackaling the Scary Sharp method.
I have never used this method so I do have a few questions….
Because my system will have individual (switchable) glass plates for the different grits.. How many grits are really necessary.
I seen one post where the individual had 7 different gritts?? Isn’t that an overkill?
What type of glass are you people using for this? Does it have to be tempered? If so WHY?
What thickness of glass are you using and why?
Thanks
David Bethune


27 replies so far

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2353 days


#1 posted 1972 days ago

Here is the best information I have found on the Scary Sharp system….btw I use 3 grits of Micro-Abrasives…

Brent's Sharpening Pages

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

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rtb

1099 posts in 2312 days


#2 posted 1972 days ago

Dave I have a standard sheet of 60 grit taped to a flat 12×12 tile. ( saw a video the other were they just used a piece of hardboard), I only use this for fattening etc. Put a sheet of 100, use it and flip it off. and repeat with each grit keeping them in order as they come off so they are in proper sequence for the next item. This is so fast I fail to see any advantage to having it automated. Also note that this is not the high priced adhesive sand paper.

-- RTB. stray animals are just looking for love

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Karson

34858 posts in 3000 days


#3 posted 1972 days ago

David:

There is my sharpening station

I’ve made some changes to it in the last couple of weeks with using sandpaper attached to the mdf disks.

I’m not yet at the place that I’m going to post my results. But I’ve also used some diamond disks and I’m getting fantastic results.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View BigFoot Products Canada's profile

BigFoot Products Canada

620 posts in 1992 days


#4 posted 1972 days ago

Well it was just a challenge I gave myself to make an automated system is all. It’s a very simple jig to make, like I said I will be posting it soon. Maybe it will go in my scrap-pile of senseless jigs..LOL
I intend on adhering it with Krylon Easy Tack to the glass sheets. I have to have the glass cut tommorow for the unit and that’s why I wanted to know how many grits? I will buy enough glass inserts for as many grits as are necessary. 7 is fine if they are all really needed, but I just felt it was an overkill is all.
Can you use just regular 1/4” pane glass and if not why not?
Thanks

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 2309 days


#5 posted 1972 days ago

1/4 plate is all I use, just get the shop to round the corners a bit, makes it easier on the hands :-)
fred

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

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BigFoot Products Canada

620 posts in 1992 days


#6 posted 1972 days ago

Karson,
I had a look at your system. It seems very good. So what your doing is just using the MDF (nothing else) with compounds is that correct? Interesting.
I’ve been making those attachements .. (I think you called them an aluminum shaft extension by Beal?) on my lathe, for years now (use hardwoods) to fit the shafts of electric motors. I then turn down & thread the end of the shaft to accept actual Lathe Faceplates. That way you can just spin them on and off. I’ve made several 12” disk sanders for people using that method. They work great. You might consider turning some for your type of system, easy to do and WAY cheaper I’m sure. That way you could mount your MDF using rear mount faceplate screws and true up the disk prior to removing it and swithing it to your electric motor shaft.
The system I am now designing does not use a spinning action. I will build one like yours though eventually and give it a try.

By following the links provided I found the answer to one of my questions and that was that only three grits
for the glass scary sharp system are what’s recommended.

The grits of the 3 abrasives are:

15 micron—600 grit—roughly comparable to Japanese water stone rated 1000
5 micron—1200 grit—between 4000 and 5000 Japanese water stone
0.5 micron—2000+?—8000+ Japanese water stone

Now I want to know what kind of glass people are using and why?
Thanks

View cmaeda's profile

cmaeda

205 posts in 2153 days


#7 posted 1972 days ago

I use 3/8” glass with 3 grits – 80, 220 and 600
Gets the job done well.
Since the glass is so thin, I sharpen on top of my tablesaw.
I have sharpened on top of a really uneven surface before and broke the glass.

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BigFoot Products Canada

620 posts in 1992 days


#8 posted 1972 days ago

Thank you for the info!

View Karson's profile

Karson

34858 posts in 3000 days


#9 posted 1972 days ago

David you are correct on the sharpening station. I only use buffing compound. I’ve since (last couple of weeks) made a few more disks and put PSA sandpaper on them to try. I’ve had some Diamond Film disks that are used to polish optical fiber prior to splicing the fibers together. I bought, but haven’t gotten some .5 micron diamond disks which state that they are similar to 60,000 grit

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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BigFoot Products Canada

620 posts in 1992 days


#10 posted 1972 days ago

Wow Karson.. now that’s a fine grit. Can you buy that in sheets also rather than disks? I’d be really interested in how they work out for you. I guess loading up would not really be a problem at that grit rate and being diamond.. hmmmm they’d last a long long time.

View cabinetmaster's profile

cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 2157 days


#11 posted 1972 days ago

David, I got the WS3000 for Christmas but have not had the chance to use it yet. How do you like yours?
I bought the leather hone for it this weekend so that I would have the complete set-up.

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2248 days


#12 posted 1972 days ago

I really liked Kasron design, as its darn cheap (MDF) and can conform to any shape and size (when dealing with carving/turning tools), but am curious to see what you’ve conjured up David...

As far as grits go, I am very minimal with my grits – I shape my blade on a 100 abrasive, smooth it out a bit on a 150. and then start honing – to hone, I go through 400 → 600 → 1000 → 2500. I now only do the honing on the micro bevel, so that is very fast, and easy. I might go higher in the future if I’m really bored and want to add more steps, but so far this is working fantastic for me

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Karson's profile

Karson

34858 posts in 3000 days


#13 posted 1972 days ago

I’ve got some PSA diamond 3 X 4” sheets on 5 mic, 3 mic and 1 mic I’ve seem some small mic disks in 8” stuff. Look on eBay for diamond film, diamond lapping and micron disks. Sometime things show up.

The latest disks that I bought are just film disks, I’ll need some spray adhesive to mount them on the mdf disks.

This is using a 2” Stanley chisel on end grain on a sapele block

I sharpened this set from Manufactured tips to final sharpening in around 15 minutes for the set of 8.

This is the back of the 2” Stanley. My reflection and the camera

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View BigFoot Products Canada's profile

BigFoot Products Canada

620 posts in 1992 days


#14 posted 1972 days ago

WOW that’s impressive Karson. Why don’t you move next door.

View BigFoot Products Canada's profile

BigFoot Products Canada

620 posts in 1992 days


#15 posted 1972 days ago

Cabinet Master,
I bought all of the add-ons for the Worksharp 3000 and made a real nice case to hold the machine with drawers to hold the accessories. I think it’s a GREAT product. Things like the see through disks.. we could make those ya know.. Actually we could make the whole darn machine if we put our minds to it. Maybe someday.. just for fun.. HMMMM
I made one similar to the Tormek SYSTEM. The whole key to that unit was the slow speed. Ya know I searched and searched for slow speed motors, even bought a couple.. but no luck.. not enought tork..THEN I figured it out. Use a 1750 rpm 1/4 hp motor and butt the shaft against a mandrell mounted 5” rubber wheel and VOILA! Perfect rotation aprox 80rpm.
The rest was easy.. just build the extras to go with it. The grinding wheel is the most expensive part.
Around $60.00 total and youve got a wet system. Weld up the arms to hold the tools, piece of cake.
My friends like em too.. especially when they aren’t the one’s who had to build them..lol
I really enjoy the challengs of certain jigs and stuff. If I like somethin I always give it a shot first in the shop unless I get lazy.. or if I fail..:( then I buy one and put it on the shelf with the rest of my contraptions..:)

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