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A thought about Carbon Monoxide

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Forum topic by Dallas posted 12-30-2014 07:25 PM 1248 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dallas

3599 posts in 1953 days


12-30-2014 07:25 PM

Years ago I worked as the IT guy for a small electric utility.
In order to smoke I had to go outside, (our servers needed clean air).
Next door to us was a workshop where they did a lot of things, some engineering, some chemistry, some electronics.

One thing they invented was a system to kill anything living in potable water or in a hospital situation. This included Blood plasma and sometimes regular fresh blood. The fresh blood would need to be run through an oxygenator to be used afterward.

Interestingly, all of this cleansing, death and destruction was because the system used carbon monoxide.
Carbon Monoxide will kill any living cell in short order. If it could be fed to a cancerous growth without involving the surrounding healthy tissue, it would kill the cancer in seconds with out danger of the cancer spreading.

Now to my thought:

If you find critters like powder post beetles in a piece you have built and finished, could you put the piece in a large bag and fill it with exhaust from a car?
Yes, I know that there will be a lot of water vapor, that is what modern cars make, but there is still an element of CO in the mix, along with other things.

Filter the moisture, let the gas through… that could be accomplished in a lot of ways, it’s not my job to perfect it, only to pose the question, but this seems like it might have possibilities.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!


23 replies so far

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dawsonbob

1919 posts in 1221 days


#1 posted 12-30-2014 07:28 PM

Interesting. I’ll watch this thread; should be a good one.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

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dhazelton

2325 posts in 1762 days


#2 posted 12-30-2014 07:38 PM

Insects don’t have lungs so don’t ‘breathe’ oxygen technically, but they do need it to survive. And they give off carbon dioxide like we do. So yes – I would say you can kill them with CO. But would you kill all the eggs they leave behind in wood?

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higtron

207 posts in 2143 days


#3 posted 12-30-2014 08:03 PM

Could this work on ex-wives, and bosses?

-- A friend will help you move, a good friend will help you move a body

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TopamaxSurvivor

17672 posts in 3142 days


#4 posted 12-30-2014 08:22 PM

Good idea. let us know how it works.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1953 days


#5 posted 12-30-2014 08:25 PM

dhazelton, Actually, insects do breath oxygen through various means. Most breath through the joints in it’s body.
We protect the gardens around here with diatomaceous earth. It is non hazardous, non poisonous and safe for pets.
Diatomaceous earth is made up of diatomes, little critters that lived millions of years ago. What is left is the shells, which are very good at filtration, but also each piece is razor sharp.
It gets into the insects joints and cuts them all up so they can’t transfer air.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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RRBOU

136 posts in 1758 days


#6 posted 12-30-2014 08:33 PM



dhazelton, Actually, insects do breath oxygen through various means. Most breath through the joints in it s body.
We protect the gardens around here with diatomaceous earth. It is non hazardous, non poisonous and safe for pets.
Diatomaceous earth is made up of diatomes, little critters that lived millions of years ago. What is left is the shelss, which are very good at filtration, but also each piece is razor sharp. It gets into the insects joints and cuts them all up so they can t transfer air.

- Dallas

The way I understand it is that the diatoms earth cuts the joints up and the insect basically dehydrates because of the loss of fluid.

Copied from the National Pesticide Information Center
Diatomaceous earth is not poisonous; it does not have to be eaten in order to be effective. Diatomaceous earth causes insects to dry out and die by absorbing the oils and fats from the cuticle of the insect’s exoskeleton. Its sharp edges are abrasive, speeding up the process. It remains effective as long as it is kept dry and undisturbed.

-- If guns cause crime all of mine are defective Randy

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1953 days


#7 posted 12-30-2014 08:34 PM

TopamaxSurvivor, I don’t have the resources or the energy any more. My race is nearly run, but I wanted to give other, younger folks a thought that might blossom.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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TopamaxSurvivor

17672 posts in 3142 days


#8 posted 12-30-2014 08:38 PM

Dallas, Fortunately I do not have any infected wood to test your idea, but I think it is a good one. I’ll be watching for results.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1953 days


#9 posted 12-30-2014 08:44 PM

RRBOU, You are correct. I was going by what I read long ago with a faulty memory.

However it works, the critters are deceased within a very short time.
I am also not sure what it does for spiders, but that is a different thread.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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rantingrich

372 posts in 811 days


#10 posted 12-30-2014 08:47 PM

Why not use RID and the egg comb included

-- Rich

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RRBOU

136 posts in 1758 days


#11 posted 12-30-2014 09:05 PM

The only way that I know of to get rid of Powder Post beetles is with heat. Killing the larva and eggs is a priority with these suckers.

-- If guns cause crime all of mine are defective Randy

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REO

889 posts in 1540 days


#12 posted 12-30-2014 10:13 PM

in Complete combustion the two main results are water and carbon dioxide not carbon monoxide. although both will render the same results: asphyxiation. CO is considered poisonous while CO2 is not. CO steals Oxygen to become the CO2 and CO2 wont let go of the O2 it has.

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WarrenC

5 posts in 709 days


#13 posted 12-30-2014 10:47 PM

Good Idea

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Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2575 days


#14 posted 12-31-2014 12:04 AM

CEO’s got it. Very little carbon monoxide exits the tail pipe due to the oxidation reduction reaction taking place in the catalytic converter(s). Still, pumping exhaust into a space will asphyxiate any critter in that space. If that company used carbon monoxide to clean blood, I’d be surprised. It is a poison. What are they killing, in this case?

If you have access to nitrogen gas, that might work. As far as beetles that haven’t hatched, do they not need oxygen? Seems like a nitrogen purge would kill anything if left inside that container.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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SASmith

1850 posts in 2453 days


#15 posted 12-31-2014 12:22 AM

It is a good idea. The practice has been around a while.
This pdf is about fumigating grain.

“Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a fumigant that produces
no harmful residues and is relatively safe to use. It is
effective in killing insects in all stages of their life
cycles and could be used for long-term storage of
products. Nowadays, CO2 is the only fumigant that can
be used to control insect pests in organic product
storage. CO 2 fumigation should be practiced under
completely sealed storage, and concentration must be
maintained at 35% or higher during the first 15 days.”

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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