LumberJocks

Adding Faceplates

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by April Wilkerson posted 12-30-2014 04:10 PM 1552 views 1 time favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View April Wilkerson's profile

April Wilkerson

117 posts in 1037 days


12-30-2014 04:10 PM

I’m currently building a storage cubby thing, it’s pretty much a rectangle made up of several boxes, but I have a question about adding faceplates.

I’m building the body from 3/4” but would like a thicker look for the outside frame, I’m thinking 1 1/2”. So I cut some faceplates and am playing around with attaching them but the overhang it creates drives me nuts. I looked at how my kitchen cabinets were built and see they used the same technique so I’m figuring it’s normal but I wanted to ask before moving forward. Is this the proper way to do things?

-- Wilkerson


9 replies so far

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19167 posts in 2134 days


#1 posted 12-30-2014 04:18 PM

Face frames typically have an overhang.

Were I to do it (I haven’t built any face frames, yet!!!)....
I would have the (top of) bottom flush, for ease of removing items.
Perhaps the horizontal frame could be 1” to 1-1/4”....

Just an idea….

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View April Wilkerson's profile

April Wilkerson

117 posts in 1037 days


#2 posted 12-30-2014 04:25 PM

Ooh, face frames is the proper term? Thanks. : )

-- Wilkerson

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5208 posts in 1502 days


#3 posted 12-30-2014 04:44 PM

You can round off the edges a bit and that will help some of that bulky look. Softening corners on square boxes makes it look smaller.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1140 days


#4 posted 12-30-2014 04:46 PM

There is a book I really like that covers the basics of furniture construction and techniques that you might want to look at.

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Illustrated-Furniture-Cabinet-Construction-ebook/dp/B003TXSR14/ref=sr_1_13?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1419957498&sr=1-13&keywords=woodworking+cabinets

I tend to remember my larger library had this book and many book stores carry it to if you want to browse though it. I like it because it’s not so much a project book as shows how the pieces of furniture fit together.

View RichM's profile

RichM

53 posts in 722 days


#5 posted 12-30-2014 05:39 PM

Having a hangover on the out side of around 1/8” and on the inside of around 3/4” is fairly standard for a cabinet. The out side gap lets you get the cabinets tight to each other without the whole box having to be perfect, the inside gap helps hold your shelfs in place.

In short yes it is a common way of doing things. but you can do most any version as long as you get the doors to fit right it all looks good.

-- Rich, Learn something everyday even if it is how NOT to do it.

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1914 posts in 1774 days


#6 posted 12-30-2014 05:52 PM

Hi April,
There are lots of ways to make face frames, The book Richard recommends is one of many good resources.
Normally the face frame is made up of 3/4” stock at 1-1/2” to 2” wide. Some times they (stiles and rails) are all the same size, and often the rails are wider to give a beefy effect.
(Stiles go up and down and the rails go across like a fence rail).
I like to use pocket hole joinery to assemble the face frame, and either pocket holes or biscuits to secure the face frame to the carcass.
The bottom rail should be flush with the bottom shelf. and the top of the top rail should be flush with the cabinet top as the sides will be flush with the cabinet sides. ... Unless it is an inset mount then everything all the overhangs are flush to the inside of the carcass.
Good for you to look at the kitchen cabinets for ideas, but remember that is one way to do it at the factory …
I hope this helped and didn’t put you into sensory overload.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View April Wilkerson's profile

April Wilkerson

117 posts in 1037 days


#7 posted 12-30-2014 07:25 PM

Thanks for the input everyone.

Richard: Thanks for the book recommendation! I see there are three parts, do you recommend specifically the second volume?

Grumpymike: :) Great job explaining clearly, I get what you are saying. Question though….I was planning on making the top of the bottom rail flush with the bottom shelf, so there will be no hangover on the bottom at least. Is that proper?

-- Wilkerson

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1140 days


#8 posted 12-31-2014 05:18 PM

April,

I think there are more than the original 3 now, that one and the joinery one are my favorites however.

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1914 posts in 1774 days


#9 posted 12-31-2014 05:41 PM

OK, if you use 3/4” material for the carcass, and 1-1/2” to 1-3/4” stiles and or rails, there will be an over lap at the bottom of the cabinet … look at the bottom of your kitchen cabinets … the recess where the under counter lights are. (assuming that your house is newer than 1959).
A lot of cabinets back in the day had the lower shelf and a bottom to the cabinet … So the bottom rail was flush to the bottom shelf and the bottom of the cabinet … rising wood costs eliminated the cabinet bottoms.
Now, if your cabinet carcass sides are long enough they will match the faceframe, so raise the bottom shelf a bit.
Ie: If your carcass is 3/4 and the shelf material is 3/4, and your rails are 1-3/4, make the top of the shelf at 1-3/4 from the base and it will look like there is no overhang.
easy peasy after you picture it in your head. just raise the bottom shelf equal to the width of the frame rail.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com