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Cutting a circular top

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Forum topic by ezgnann posted 12-29-2014 03:04 PM 817 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ezgnann

30 posts in 2083 days


12-29-2014 03:04 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question jig

Recently, I acquired some pieces of 1 3/4 oak and I want to make a circular top out of it. What is going to be the best way to cut the top?

1. I have looked into a circle cuttlng jig and spiral bits for my router. Bits that cut to 1 3/4 are a bit expensive (pun intended) but I am willing to do it if that is best.

2. I could rough cut it with a jig or band saw, but I will still have a clean the edges with a router bit.

3. What else am I missing?

Thanks in advance for your guidance.

-- Woodworking is cheaper than psychotherapy and better for me than whiskey


12 replies so far

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joey502

487 posts in 977 days


#1 posted 12-29-2014 03:12 PM

I don’t see that you are missing anything. Cutting close to the line before routing sounds like a good plan. Just remember not to climb cut.

I do not see any reason the bit has to be spiral. Spiral would be better but it is not a must. The risk of tear out lessens with the spiral bit but a straight bit would get it done.

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#2 posted 12-29-2014 03:18 PM

If you have the band saw, then a circle cutting jig ifor the BS is the best way to go. There are loads of plans on google, that can get pretty complicated, but all you really need is a base, a cleat into your miter slot and a pivot point at the radius. I’ve got one hanging in the shop from a 24” tabletop that I made just out of scraps, and just use a screw through the bottom for the pivot, if I made more circles, I’d consider making a fancier adjustable one.

Check out BFD's project

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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ezgnann

30 posts in 2083 days


#3 posted 12-29-2014 03:42 PM

@chefdan – How do you deal with blade drift and deflection on the BS? What size blade did you use for your 24 inch table top?

@joey502 0 What do you mean by climb cut?

-- Woodworking is cheaper than psychotherapy and better for me than whiskey

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jmartel

6564 posts in 1609 days


#4 posted 12-29-2014 03:44 PM

Another thing you can do is to go as deep as you can with a spiral bit and then use a flush trim bit with the bearing riding on the surface that the spiral bit cut. That lets you cut it from both sides so you only need 7/8” on either side to cut.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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ezgnann

30 posts in 2083 days


#5 posted 12-29-2014 04:17 PM

I like the half spiral/ flush trim approach. Realistically, what is the most I should remove at one time with the flush trim bit? Assuming I remove the mass of material with the bandsaw or jigsaw and leave the finishing cut to the router, there still would be quite a bit of material to be cut.

-- Woodworking is cheaper than psychotherapy and better for me than whiskey

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jmartel

6564 posts in 1609 days


#6 posted 12-29-2014 04:19 PM

I generally like to keep passes on the router 1/8”-1/4” at a time. Usually results in less chipout.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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JAAune

1634 posts in 1776 days


#7 posted 12-29-2014 07:44 PM

I use a bandsaw circle-cutting jig but the pivot point slides back and forth. There’s an article in Fine Woodworking.

Michael Fortune Bandsaw Circle Jig

That will get a perfect circle very quickly and won’t need much cleaning. Bandsaw drift and deflection won’t happen on a properly-tune saw that has a good blade installed.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1100 posts in 1505 days


#8 posted 12-29-2014 08:06 PM

Two thoughts:
  1. As others have suggested, cut close to the line, but flush up with a router
  2. Buy/make a circle cutting jig for your router and make progressively deeper passes.

Woodworkers Journal is featuring a circle cutting jig for jigsaws and routers in this month’s issue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4D08zHvtlcg

-- paxorion

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#9 posted 12-29-2014 11:05 PM


@chefdan – How do you deal with blade drift and deflection on the BS? What size blade did you use for your 24 inch table top?

1) Tune the saw, and watch the snodgrass tuning method, with it I don’t get any drift,
1.5) Use a good blade, I Like timberwolf and wood slicer
2) 3/8

- ezgnann


-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

392 posts in 2481 days


#10 posted 12-29-2014 11:29 PM

What diameter circle are we talking about? At an 1-3/4 thickness I’m assuming that you’re thinking about a fairly large circle. I built my bandsaw circle cutting jig based on Winky's with some minor modifications. That allows me to cut circles from as little as 3 inches out to about 6 feet in diameter (using supplemental support). The size circle you’re making determines the size blade you need to use. Small circles need a small blade but that leaves a rougher edge. For smaller circles, I use a similar jig on my sanding station to smooth out the edges. For large circles, you can honestly just sand off the saw marks free hand and the very minor variations from a perfect circle won’t be noticeable to the eye unless you really go wild with the sander.

-- Greg, Severn MD

View Radu's profile

Radu

324 posts in 2503 days


#11 posted 12-30-2014 12:23 AM

Here is link to a Youtube video – cut a circle on table saw http://youtu.be/Wxbzrf4z_cg
Check it out – it might work for you.

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pintodeluxe

4852 posts in 2273 days


#12 posted 12-30-2014 12:36 AM

I use a circle cutting jig and a plunge router. With a spiral bit I don’t worry about pre-cutting close to the line. I just cut the circle out in 3-4 light passes. The jig ensures the circle remains true.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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