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Forum topic by BethMartin posted 02-26-2009 06:40 PM 1223 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BethMartin

111 posts in 2066 days


02-26-2009 06:40 PM

Inspiration pic

So I want to make some built-ins for our downstairs living room that are the same wood/finish as in my inspiration pic seen here. Can anyone with an eye for this point me in the right direction? Thanks!! (I already have the blue).

-- Beth


32 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15706 posts in 2907 days


#1 posted 02-26-2009 06:45 PM

Hard to tell from a distance, but it looks like mission style, which is traditionally done in QS white oak. The stain could be whatever you choose from a color chart. If you were going to hand finish, I’d recommend a satin finish wipe-on polyurethane.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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tenontim

2131 posts in 2433 days


#2 posted 02-26-2009 06:54 PM

Charlie is right on with the Mission/Arts and Crafts style. Looks to be a dark oak dye or stain on the wood, and the hand rubbed finish would be perfect. The other colors in the room could probably be found in the Historic colors of either Sherwin Williams or Benjamin Moore. Good luck.

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BethMartin

111 posts in 2066 days


#3 posted 02-26-2009 07:44 PM

Thanks guys! Though, if anyone has a specific brand of stain/color to recommend, I’d be really grateful. For some reason, I am notoriously bad for selecting wood stain color – it never seems to come out close to what I think it’s going to be! And then I end up buying several colors, etc. etc. ;)

-- Beth

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2082 days


#4 posted 02-26-2009 11:11 PM

If you are not considering oak (expensive for this project, you can build it with plywood and Poplar trim. When finished, just grab a sample piece and try different stains to check wich one is closer to the picture.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15706 posts in 2907 days


#5 posted 02-26-2009 11:18 PM

Doubthead is right about sampling the stain.

You can never be sure just by looking at a can or a color chart how a stain is going to look on the particular wood you are working with. The best you can do is pick something close, and test it on a small piece of your lumber. If you are really going for a specific color, you may find that you have to buy a couple of different colors and experiment with different mixes until you get just what you want.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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CharlieM1958

15706 posts in 2907 days


#6 posted 02-26-2009 11:22 PM

And I forgot to mention that application has a lot to do with final color as well. How long you leave it on the surface before wiping, whether you use a rag or a brush, one coat or two…. all these things make a difference. So even if I could tell you that the cabinets in the photo were Minwax American Walnut on white oak, you could still end up with something different if you varied in the application process.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2082 days


#7 posted 02-26-2009 11:32 PM

Also, would be better if you find a local building with this type of architectural woodwork (Public Library, City Hall, Museum, Church or a friend’s house) so you can comapare directly your stain samples with the light variations.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5113 posts in 2401 days


#8 posted 02-27-2009 01:29 AM

Jenn and I assembled some furniture for our daughter and we wanted to match the raw wood to the stain of her crib. We took a piece of the crib to a paint store NOT a big box store and worked with the folks there and they spent a good hour with us trying different stains and combinations of finishes until we had a perfect match…they did not charge us for the time or myriad cans of finish they opened but they sure got a confirmed customer. So I would suggest find a Paint store in your area and foster a good working relationship with them. Take your inspirational photo and the vision you have for your room and let them help.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View BethMartin's profile

BethMartin

111 posts in 2066 days


#9 posted 02-27-2009 01:36 AM

Well, I guess it helps that it would be just as hard to pick the color for the experts as it would be for me. That makes me feel a little better. I still need to pick wood though. There’s a woodworking store sorta near where I live that I’ve been meaning to check out. I need to walk in there with my picture and cry “help me”. :)

-- Beth

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5113 posts in 2401 days


#10 posted 02-27-2009 01:49 AM

I hope you find some great wood.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14872 posts in 2365 days


#11 posted 02-27-2009 02:27 AM

Boy, oh boy, you guys are good, analyzing the wood and stain in picture.:-)

About all I would say is go a shade or 2 lighter than you think you really want. You can always darken. Dark makes a space seem smaller. That is my wife’s only cmaplaint about the wood work and cabinets in our house. It was all dark walnut stain. The kitchen looks twice a big with the golden glow of oak. (No, I didn’t build them, too much of a project for my time back then. I would build them today.)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2433 days


#12 posted 02-28-2009 07:52 PM

Beth, if you’re looking for the oak look without the price, and you aren’t set on having the Quarter Sawn white oak “flake” in it, you can make the piece from Ash. (the poor man’s oak). It’s relatively cheaper than QSWO and a little cheaper than flat sawn. It takes a dye real good, so you can get the color about the same. Charlie is right on about the plywood, although hardwood ply is expensive, too. Just use 1/4” for the panels.

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2779 days


#13 posted 02-28-2009 08:12 PM

Hi,

can you post a closer pic?

Traditionally, the woodwork in the millwork in these houses were made of something other than oak. Ash, gumwood, douglas fir, pine, etc. They would be stained dark though. I recommend the book Shop Plans for Craftsman Interiors.
http://craftsmanplans.com/Book%203%20TOC_4.htm

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 3003 days


#14 posted 02-28-2009 08:23 PM

See if you can find a local hardwood supplier. The guys that supply the cabinet shops. Oak in not an expensive wood. 1/4 sawn oak is a little spendy, but just getting a portion of it for the visible areas looks really good. The labor is the expensive part. I pay just about the same for ash or poplar as I do for oak. Which is only about a 1/3 more than pine. If you try to get your wood from HomeDespot or most lumber stores you will be paying a premium. Pay the extra to get domestic plywood. You will save in the long run. Minwax Early American is a good looking stain for this kinda project. Some stains hide the grain (which is what many prefer even if they don’t know it) and some highlight the grain. Minwax will highlight it. The importain thing is to get colors YOU like! That project would look good in just about any wood. My guess is that might actually be a stained fur or redwood. Which was used in many of the homes built on the west coast.

View BethMartin's profile

BethMartin

111 posts in 2066 days


#15 posted 02-28-2009 08:26 PM

Thanks, everyone. And John, thanks for that book recommendation, I think that’s exactly what I need. I’m going to the woodworking store today…maybe they will have it there. I’ll let you know what I’ve picked for wood. Hopefully I will get some soon! I’ll be able to get started as soon as I can haul my father-in-law’s table saw to my house. :)

-- Beth

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