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General care suggestions? - transitional hand plane

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Forum topic by Charlie posted 12-28-2014 05:31 PM 763 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie

1100 posts in 1753 days


12-28-2014 05:31 PM

My brother in Florida, sent me a BEAUTIFUL Stanley Bailey No 35 hand plane. Sweetheart. I’m guessing between 1928 and 1935.

ANYWAYS… I don’t own any other transitional planes. Before I take this beauty out to my UNHEATED shop and put it in the drawer with my other planes…. would there be any reason NOT to put it out there? I’m obviously not going to toss it in a drawer where it could bash into other planes, but then NONE of my planes can bash into each other. The ones I have get waxed, lubed, and whatever before they get put away for the winter. If I need to heat up the shop and USE them, then I have to clean them off first. No problem.

But this TRANSITIONAL plane is…. well it’s different. And I don’t want to screw it up.

Thoughts?

I’ll post a couple pics when I can but it’s really so darn pretty I almost don’t want to actually USE it….

almost…

  • EDIT ** adding pictures…


6 replies so far

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


#1 posted 12-28-2014 07:56 PM

That’s one of the nicest #35s I’ve ever seen. I’d keep it in the house, the occasional warmup of a cold shop will subject the cold cast iron to condensation issues.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Charlie

1100 posts in 1753 days


#2 posted 12-28-2014 09:04 PM

I was actually more concerned about the wood! :) But now that you mention it…. the combination of wood and cast iron could be an issue. My other planes don’t have condensation issues when I warm the shop. But they’re not really exposed as they’re in a drawer. When I warm the shop, I bring it up to about 65 degrees and don’t even bother going out there until it’s been at that temp for about 2 hours (unless I have a REALLY short job to do out there. I leave things to warm up because it doesn’t matter how warm the air is if all the tools are like ice. I let things warm up. The ones that get used get cleaned and protected before putting them away.

But this one tool…. I would just hate to see it get loosened up or something due to my own ignorance of how it should be treated.

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Don W

17971 posts in 2034 days


#3 posted 12-29-2014 11:57 AM

The same treatment should be fine. Wax should protect it.

I agree with PK, its in very nice shape.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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Tim

3119 posts in 1428 days


#4 posted 12-30-2014 01:02 AM

Man that’s nice looking. Jut my thoughts, but put it on your bookshelf and take it out with you when you’re ready to go out in the shop.

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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


#5 posted 12-30-2014 02:47 PM

Most of the degradation of condition that my planes suffer is when they are brought into a warm house from outside. Just the drive home, on a winter’s day, chills down a plane or any other tool enough that it ‘sweats’ condensation once it is brought into a warm cozy house.

Well… on the other hand, it’s -30 outside here right now in my neck of the woods.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Tim

3119 posts in 1428 days


#6 posted 12-31-2014 02:06 AM

Good point PK, depends on the temperature change. Camera equipment doesn’t like that either PK, so I read that you just need to slow down the temperature adjustment enough by either leaving it in the camera bag and wrapping a few towels around it or wrapping the parts with a cloth and placing them in ziploc bags before bringing them in. Probably wouldn’t need to be that drastic with vintage tools unless you were bringing home a cherry 51/52 set or something like that. Maybe something moderate would work.

Oh and you can keep your arctic air. We haven’t had anything real cold yet this winter and I’d be fine if I just got plenty of snow and no arctic air.

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