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Forum topic by Lalaland posted 07-18-2007 04:16 AM 1395 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lalaland

44 posts in 3757 days


07-18-2007 04:16 AM

Is it possible to make a wooden plane with a cutting iron at a low angle? Or is there not enough wood to support?


11 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13708 posts in 3876 days


#1 posted 07-18-2007 05:27 AM

Hmmm. I would have to defer to Phil on this one. He is the resident expert on making wooden planes.

Also his personal web site – http://www.philsville.co.uk

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Dorje

1763 posts in 3775 days


#2 posted 07-18-2007 08:31 AM

I would certainly ask Phil first, but my best guess is that you could make a plane with a fairly low cutting angle, given that the wood you’re using for the plane body is fairly dense and long wearing. Also, this may be where the use of something along the lines of boxwood inserts in front of or behind the mouth would be in order? I’d be interested in hearing the “real” answer though!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

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Philip Edwards

245 posts in 4218 days


#3 posted 07-20-2007 09:02 AM

Lala
As the bed angle gets lower there is less and less support to the iron, especially at the important area at the cutting edge. As the bed reaches the mouth it gets thinner and thinner – the lower the angle the thinner the bed becomes over its whole length. That’s why planemakers were delighted when plane bodies could be cast in metal – they could make all kinds of shapes that would be too fragile in timber.
But you can make a low angle plane in wood – 35 degrees should easily be achievable.
Hope this helps
Phil

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Douglas Bordner

4018 posts in 3842 days


#4 posted 07-20-2007 06:15 PM

Does anyone have a resource on where to begin constructing these beauties? Something with pictures and diagrams for the 3D impaired? I see there seems to be a book that is constantly referred to , and will go there if need be but I’m watching every penny these days and would like to plumb the depths of web-based knowledge before adding any more weight to the already groaning bookshelves. Thanks all.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

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WayneC

13708 posts in 3876 days


#5 posted 07-20-2007 07:08 PM

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Dorje

1763 posts in 3775 days


#6 posted 07-20-2007 09:13 PM

Don’t know when it’ll happen, but I can’t wait to make one of these…

Lala – Thanks for bringing the topic up!

Douglas – I bought that book – figured $12 was a decent price to pay, knowing that it’ll cost a bit more to actually build one, or two. And, I’ve read the online stuff, which doesn’t seem to be as comprehensive as I’ll need things to be while heading into the realm of plane making.

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

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WayneC

13708 posts in 3876 days


#7 posted 07-20-2007 09:20 PM

Oh and there are the Hock Kits. They have a video of how to make a plane on youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLNRkyCTlT4

http://www.hocktools.com/kf175.htm

I’ve been thinking of buying a few blades and a kit. I have some wood (Osage Orange and Jarrah) set aside for a Krenov style plane.

Here is another of a handmade plane in use

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QP9tNMQBmWM

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Dorje

1763 posts in 3775 days


#8 posted 07-21-2007 01:29 AM

Wayne – I’ve got some osage orange set aside too!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4018 posts in 3842 days


#9 posted 07-21-2007 07:33 PM

I am slightly confused about something and have a wood question as well. One of the links above shows a chip-breaker in the mix, is that normal, and two, would rock maple be an acceptable material for the body?

As a side note, on one of the sponsored links on the side of the screen I saw an auction featuring “exotic osage orange” lumber for sale. Pam and I had to chuckle, as here on the Great American Prairie most of the barbed wire fence posts on the farms and ranches are made of Hedge-Apple wood, the exotic being sold. Location, location, location. I’m still hoping to run across some “exotic” Far-East Asian crating material as a free-cycle.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

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WayneC

13708 posts in 3876 days


#10 posted 07-21-2007 08:27 PM

Yes, chip breakers are normal for wooden smoothing planes, jack planes, etc. You would not see them in molding planes. Check out the ones that Hpck sells. http://www.hocktools.com/products.htm#PI

I would think that rock maple would work fine, although you should consider cutting up a few fence posts. I belive I paid $15 for a 3×3x18 Hedge-Apple turning block at the local Rocker store.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Dorje

1763 posts in 3775 days


#11 posted 07-22-2007 03:13 AM

Douglas – I think the rock maple would work too…

How much would a 4”x4”x8’er of Hedge Apple go for in your neck of the woods? Do they sell these posts at your local box store?

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

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