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Forum topic by knexster posted 12-26-2014 06:53 AM 1665 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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knexster

33 posts in 751 days


12-26-2014 06:53 AM

In the next few weeks I will be investing in my first router. I plan to get a Bosch 1617evspk.

I have been researching DIY tables since I have read a lot of negative things on any table that is budget friendly. I highly considered the Bosch RA1171 or RA1181 which would suffice my needs at the moment but I imagine as my knowledge grows I’ll kick myself for not spending the money on building my own. Plus, that’s why I’m getting into woodworking, for the diy aspect, so buying something I can build feels like a cop out.

Anyway, here is the build I plan to follow: http://www.americanwoodworker.com/blogs/projects/pages/american-woodworker-router-table.aspx

After searching around for the hardware it seems the Rousseau plate that is used may be better replaced by another plate but I’m having trouble finding a decent alternative.

I also plan to use this switch instead: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B005W17FRS/ref=aw_wl_ov_dp_1_1?colid=3J6BCXC0WLU5M&coliid=I3PHPME77Z56AA

Any ideas or suggestions are greatly appreciated, thist seems like a great project, hopefully not too far above my skill level for being only second big project. This will also be the first time I really use a router ’:/

-- Don't think outside the box. The box was never there.


12 replies so far

View PhillipRCW's profile

PhillipRCW

387 posts in 732 days


#1 posted 12-26-2014 11:59 AM

Look up norm Abrams ga rage shop on YouTube. He builds a fold out router table. Very cheap fun build. Seems pretty good so far. Didn’t have to spend a ton extra money dealing with all the extras.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

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PhillipRCW

387 posts in 732 days


#2 posted 12-26-2014 12:05 PM

The switch is a nice addition too. I wouldn’t get too caught up with things at first. I feel a lot of the people here give great advice and then others are just here to impress others with money or gloat too much. The nice thing about woodworking us that no matter how much you learn you can always learn more.build an easy table. Then modify later as your skill increases and your needs change.

Oh and check the forums page. Someone listed a link to a boh Bosch router bit sale. Very nice.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1964 posts in 1456 days


#3 posted 12-26-2014 12:53 PM

One thing that I would look at is how easy is it to adjust the router bit height from above the table. I think that Bosch makes a base which allows easy above table adjustments.

Since you are just getting into woodworking, do you want and have room for a big router table like in your post. It is a very nice one but also takes up a fair amount of space. You could make a smaller one that is a portable one which you can set up on a work bench or table.

View Julian's profile

Julian

1040 posts in 2158 days


#4 posted 12-26-2014 04:01 PM

The router table/cabinet looks very similar to what I built years ago. You really need to consider what you want and expect. I made a router table/cabinet because I wanted to use a large 3+hp router with large panel bits. A large surface makes it easier and safer to router stiles, rails, and large panels. I use the bottom portion of my router table/cabinet to store other routers, bits, and all accessories. Mine is mobile and easily stores against the wall in the garage. I have the Rousseau plate which is OK but a good thick aluminum plate would be best in my opinion. You might consider just a simple table that can be mounted to a work bench. This will not cost much and over time as your needs change you can build or buy something else.

-- Julian

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14659 posts in 2151 days


#5 posted 12-26-2014 04:37 PM

Made this up a few weeks ago

Married two yard sale finds into a short, benchtop router table

and added some sort of stand to clamp it to

Parts were from a junked Loft Bed (the metal parts) and a bit of 1/2 plywood sheathing. Just Drywall screws to fasten the parts together. I can also store this thing out of the way, behind the workbench

seems to be about the right height, for me…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1819 days


#6 posted 12-26-2014 04:58 PM

After searching around for the hardware it seems the Rousseau plate that is used may be better replaced by another plate but I’m having trouble finding a decent alternative.

Rockler has some very nice router plates at reasonable prices. Mine have been in use for many years w/o issues.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2699 days


#7 posted 12-26-2014 07:04 PM

I have been happy with the Kreg plate. It comes predrilled for the hex key that adjust the bit height on your router adjustment knob.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/101964
I looooove my table. :-)
Love it!!!
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1923 posts in 1223 days


#8 posted 12-26-2014 07:39 PM

I don’t know what your budget is, but you might want to take a look at this table from Grizzy ( http://www.grizzly.com/products/Router-Table-with-Stand/T10432 ). The top is pretty good (I have one). Discard the stand and make a nice cabinet to mount the top on. It’s a great starter. I’m using mine with a Bosch 1617.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View knexster's profile

knexster

33 posts in 751 days


#9 posted 12-27-2014 04:27 AM

Thank you all for your replies. Bandit, that is an especially cool build and really creative. Dawsonbob, that is actually the best deal I have seen for an out of the box table, I actually think I ran across another post where that was recommended to another person.

I am still set on a ground up build cause I think it will be a more rewarding feeling, like building this table is my way of “earning” the router I am buying lol. However, being resourceful and upcycling is certainly rewarding too, I really want to see what I am capable of making. As far as space, I am not really hurting too much for space, but if that ever became an issue I think I’ll be happy with all the storage this table includes that it still won’t be a problem.

So I realized the actual build plans for the one I chose would cost me $9.95 so I decided on this one which has extremely well detailed plans included.

http://www.crestonwood.com/plans.php

For the plate I decided on the Kreg plate drilled for the Bosch 1617 I will be getting next month.

Since acquiring all of this will be a bit of an investment I’ll have time to find a local shop to buy the hardware and the wood I’ll need. I live in Belleville, IL not too far from the St. Louis Rockler location. I figure I’ll acquire everything over the next couple months and build the table by the end of February.

-- Don't think outside the box. The box was never there.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2699 days


#10 posted 12-27-2014 04:55 AM

“Since acquiring all of this will be a bit of an investment I’ll have time to find a local shop to buy the hardware and the wood I’ll need. I live in Belleville, IL not too far from the St. Louis Rockler location. I figure I’ll acquire everything over the next couple months and build the table by the end of February.”

Check out your local lumber yards. Not the big box stores, but the ones that sell real lumber. I buy 3/4 inch Baltic Birch for around $50 – 55 for a 60×60 inch sheet. That would be about half price of the store you are thinking about going to. They also carry just about any kind of hardwood or plywood you might ever need. Hopefully, you can find one in your neck of the woods.

Good luck. Post some pics of your build.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14659 posts in 2151 days


#11 posted 12-27-2014 07:20 AM

An older one that I no longer had the space for

Clear down there at the end of the bench.

Just a boubled plywood top. 2×4 frame made from a few pallet runners. Plywood box. Had an House style outlet box inside to plug the router into, a house style light switch and a 10’ cord outside. Plug in the cord, then the light switch could turn the router on and off. That blue panel in front is just an old cabinet door, with it’s hinges. It opens up to allow cleaning inside the box. An overhang at on end was turned into a “Dovetail jig” in which a template was screwed to the top, and the wood part was clamped to the edge. Might have made 300 or so drawers with that jig, wore out several plastic templates, too.

When the table wasn’t in use, a few handplanes seemed to think of it as a “Break Area” for them to sit on. Hidden there is the old router plate. Had a plunge router hanging from it. I think there might be a few more shots in my projects pages…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Tom Clark's profile

Tom Clark

88 posts in 2489 days


#12 posted 12-29-2014 01:14 AM

Well, you asked for ideas or suggestions:
I don’t care how big or small your shop will be, don’t waste a cubic inch of it. My router table is now 30 years old, and I have never seen one I like better, or think would be easier to use. The actual router space itself is very small. The rest of the cabinet is full of priceless drawer space. Dust collection is from behind. No lift or removable top. Why? I would never use a router bit over 1.5” in diameter, so the hole in my table is 1 5/8. Never wished it was bigger or smaller, and it allows excellent chip and dust collection.

Table top lifts, so it is very easy to adjust router up or down and change bits.

Fence is 9” high and adjusts in seconds. No slot in table so you never have to worry about keeping fence square to it.

You can just see the switches in the bottom left. One turns on shop vac, the other the router. Only costs a few dollars to wire it in. By the way, the table overhand eliminates the need for a kick plate, which really simplifies construction. Also, I only use plywood, not mdf, which is basically sawdust. It is horrible to work with, and will fall apart if it gets wet.

My Incra Jig clamps to the top with C-clamps when it is needed.

-- Tom

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