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Forum topic by Dorje posted 07-16-2007 09:17 AM 1459 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dorje

1763 posts in 3898 days


07-16-2007 09:17 AM

Why isn’t my table top showing the full thickness? I drew rectangles to cut out the openings, turned the top over and this is what I see:

The edge shows the thickness, but the rest is “hollow” – bear in mind, I’m a brand new user!

Thanks!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA


14 replies so far

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 3987 days


#1 posted 07-16-2007 10:12 AM

I’m not exactly sure what you did but in this case it doesn’t really matter. That isn’t how you want to draw your table. Drawing the table like this would be fine for a quick design study or if you were just going to use the model as furniture for a room design but you want more detail for woodworking. When working in Sketchup every piece of wood that you plan to cut should be it’s own component. Draw the leg and turn it into a component, draw the aprons and do the same, each slat gets the same treatment.

Use the intersection approach that I illustrate in my tutorial to create your joinery.

Mortice and Tenon tutorial

In the end you want to end up with an exploded view version of your model with all the dimensions annotated.

Like this bottom rail of my chair.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View 's profile

593 posts in 3873 days


#2 posted 07-16-2007 10:17 AM

Been there, done that, got the T-shirt!

It’s easy Dorje: you’ve gone too far when using the “pull” tool (or something like that, I can’t remember the proper name right now) and you’ve virtually gone “through” the tabletop. I know it’s hard to visualize because it’s not something you can do with real materials but imagine that you’ve pushed so far through the skin of the wood that you’ve turned it inside out… The solution is to pull back again.

Try it with a new rectangle: grab one surface and -without releasing at all- pull it first out and then in until you see how you are creating a void. It’s a practical application of the basics of addition and substraction of areas in geometry.

I’m not sure if anybody is still following me: on re-reading I wonder if it’s intelligible at all… :o)

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Dorje

1763 posts in 3898 days


#3 posted 07-16-2007 10:27 AM

But I only pulled the entire top up to 3/4” once. Then I drew blasted lines all over the thing an deleted the areas for the spaces…and this is what I got!

I’ll try the individual component approach…I’m gonna have to watch that video about ten times…!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 3987 days


#4 posted 07-16-2007 10:41 AM

AAhh…you probably simply deleted the bottom when you were erasing things.

If you want to do something like this Dorje just draw the geometry for the 1st opening then copy it acrosss the face by the spacing and number you want. Push the 1st one through to the bottom and it will create the whole opening in one operation. Double click each of the rest and they will all push through to the same depth as the 1st. If you’d like a tutorial I can do one tomorrow.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

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Dorje

1763 posts in 3898 days


#5 posted 07-16-2007 10:46 AM

A tutorial would be great! Still seems too advanced for me…don’t get how it could be done in one operation yet!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

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Dorje

1763 posts in 3898 days


#6 posted 07-16-2007 10:50 AM

So, now I’ve got some legs – was even able to rotate them the right way (I think) – but I wouldn’t have a clue what to do with them! Remember – I’m BRAND NEW at this…

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 3987 days


#7 posted 07-16-2007 11:34 AM

Did you create a component out of the 1st leg you drew and then copy it? That’s important when you start doing your joinery. If you create one and then copy the component any future edits you make to one happens to all at the same time. If the mortices in both side of the leg are the same all the legs can be the same component.

Here’s the tutorial for what you were asking.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 4062 days


#8 posted 07-16-2007 02:11 PM

Bob – you are a wizard!

This is more complicated than .. than… making a small wooden box!

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1141 posts in 3893 days


#9 posted 07-16-2007 04:15 PM

I think what you did was forget to hit ctrl before you pulled the top. Without ctrl when you push pull you are moving that surface, if you hit ctrl you get a little plus sign, and when you push/pull the original surface stays in place and you get to push/pull a new one.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 3987 days


#10 posted 07-16-2007 06:24 PM

LOL…you learn something new every day. I’ve never used the ctrl key with push/pull in 3 years of Sketchup use…..:) But actually it shouldn’t have mattered here. If you push/pull a plane it simply extrudes it and leaves the original in place. It’s only after you have a cube that the ctrl comes into play.

No wizard Deb…just thousands of hours. This is just one of many architectural visualizations for a waterworks renovation. This one shows some of the original architectural style being brought back. I’ve also done 3D models for all the interior process systems.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6846 posts in 3881 days


#11 posted 07-16-2007 09:20 PM

Bob;

I’m sticking with Debbie, Wizard!

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 4062 days


#12 posted 07-16-2007 10:30 PM

exactly, Lee.. I don’t care how many hours of practice: a master woodworker is a master and a wizard is a wizard.

Unbelievable model.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View jsheaney's profile

jsheaney

141 posts in 3890 days


#13 posted 07-16-2007 11:01 PM

Check out The Sketchup Show on iTunes for free video podcast tutorials. There’s 30 of them, so far.

-- Disappointment is an empty box full of expectation.

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1141 posts in 3893 days


#14 posted 07-16-2007 11:45 PM

That model is great Bob :) I’m a real sketchup newb so I love seeing what the tool can do when in the hands of a wiz :)

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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