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Forum topic by Rob posted 12-20-2014 08:56 PM 666 views 0 times favorited 2 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rob

229 posts in 2451 days


12-20-2014 08:56 PM

Have you ever had what was seemingly a good piece of lumber turn out to be a miserable you know what? I had a rough cut 5/4 Cherry board, 7 1/2” wide by 6’ long that was at least 15 years old that I cut up into 18 inch lengths for a project I wanted to get started. There was some twist but nothing to write home about and there was some cupping. No matter what I did, I couldn’t get those 18” pieces flat to save my life. I’m normally good at flattening boards with hand planes, jointer, drum sander etc. but today was just not my day. I’ve flattened 100’s of boards without too many issues over the years but after 3 plus hours, I took all those pieces and decided I would get my revenge next spring at our first camp fire. I’m assuming there was a lot of internal stress that just wouldn’t relax. Sometimes you just have to give up on a piece of wood and move on to the next board. Thankfully that board was given to me so I lost nothing other than my time and patience! Ok, now that I’ve vented, I feel better!


2 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#1 posted 12-20-2014 09:27 PM

Ran into the same thing making a picture frame as a Christmas present earlier this week. After the glue was dry it would allow one corner to sit about 5/16” above the rest on a flat surface. I ended up having to crack two opposite miters to flex it back, re-glue and re-nail it. Turned out better than I had hoped, but man what a PITA for a normally pretty simple project.

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1400 days


#2 posted 12-21-2014 05:19 PM

I’ve had those days. We all do. Some boards just won’t go (or stay) flat. You end up with an s4s toothpick because you took so much off. I have learned that the first pass on the jointer is important. If you set that flat surface incorrectly on the the first pass, you’re screwed.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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