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Hi, I need a large concrete/masonry saw

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Forum topic by SlimPickins posted 12-20-2014 04:33 PM 800 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1376 days


12-20-2014 04:33 PM

Sorry – I may have asked this question or a similar one a while back. Someone suggested that I use an ordinary circular saw fitted with a carbide/diamond blade to cut a concrete wall away. I agreed, so I bought the blade, did some home jobs with it (that I just happened to also need the special blade), then I went outside today and cut a 2” x 8” slot in the concrete – no problem at all. I’ve already gotten my money’s worth out of the blade that cost less than $20.00 at Home Depot’s or Lowe’s (I forget how much).

Well, my question is, do they make saws with larger blades? I would like a saw with at least a 14” or 16” or larger blade so that I will be able to go downwards or upwards through the concrete. Even if it’s 20”, I can always set it to 8” depth which is perhaps a bit less than maximum.

If I have to stick with my 7 1/4” diameter blade – it will take a long time and I will always only be able to penetrate about 3” or so.

As it is, I do the sawing in multiple passes to save on heating – it’s not necessary, I just like to baby my nice saws that I have.

I’m willing to spend some money – not a thousand bucks though – and should I go used on this?

Here’s a pic so you can see what I’m doing – I want to cut slots for wood posts all the way through the concrete wall. It’s not really a huge job but perhaps a bit big for my little saw – that’s all. The work I’ve done only took 5 minutes.

Thanks.

Should I just rent a saw and buy my own blade or use their blade?

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood


22 replies so far

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3039 days


#1 posted 12-20-2014 04:37 PM

Here’s one saw we use for concret in the trades

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1376 days


#2 posted 12-20-2014 04:44 PM

Hi a1Jim, thanks I’ll look into the Husky K760 you show there and I guess I might also consider renting a saw – perhaps Home Depot or Lowe’s or some other place has one. Perhaps I could even buy my own blade. The saw you show me doesn’t look real big though. I need to penetrate about 6” or so, preferably 8” which is the thickness of the concrete. I then need to go down about 3’ or so.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1376 days


#3 posted 12-20-2014 04:46 PM

That one has a 14” blade and costs about a grand or so so I guess I should try to rent one. It’s depth of cut is only 5” though – it might get me started. Thanks again.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1376 days


#4 posted 12-20-2014 04:50 PM

Ya know it’s funny – Home Depot DOES rent a Hilti TE3000 concrete breaker which is electric – this might also work! It breaks up concrete similar to an air-hammer (jack-hammer).

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3039 days


#5 posted 12-20-2014 04:52 PM

Looks like you looked it up,size-wise they’re a good size machine. Renting one should be somewhere around $80 a day
Be careful take care using this,it takes a little practice

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3039 days


#6 posted 12-20-2014 04:54 PM

Now that I take a look at your photo again ,I think an 80 LB jackhammer will do a better safer job.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1376 days


#7 posted 12-20-2014 05:01 PM

I kind of agree that using a rotary hammer by Makita will take a long time – yeah, the Hilti TE3000 might be hard to use sideways. As far as safety, I’m strong as an ox so I can pick up the (large – rotary) hammer and use it sideways without dropping it. But the TE3000 – I don’t know. I just don’t have an 80 lb. jackhammer. And I don’t have a compressor and I don’t want to hire someone. So I may have to rent a compressor and the jackhammer from Home Depot. I may look into this again (drive to Home Depot) Dec. 26 but for now, I should just relax. I DO have a 2000 lb. trailer hitch if I need to tow a compressor home.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3039 days


#8 posted 12-20-2014 05:09 PM

The electric 80lb will work it will just take a while depending on how old the concrete is.
Some places rent larger gas powered jackhammers that will work a little quicker.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1037 days


#9 posted 12-20-2014 05:15 PM

I’d go to a rental company tell them your project,what tool you think you need and let the recommend a tool.If you cutting though the floor,they have a saw on wheels that lowers.

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1376 days


#10 posted 12-20-2014 05:24 PM

I would describe the concrete as sort of well – (let’s say not still 4000lb./in strong) after 50 years of terribly wet/freezing weather. It’s more like a third that (cuts almost like butter) I might just buy a used Makita HM1500 for about 200 bucks – this is a 42 lb. hammer. Admittedly, there is large aggregate in there but the carbide blade didn’t have too much trouble so a hammer might work. I know a guy who is selling his Makita used. Just a thought anyway.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3039 days


#11 posted 12-20-2014 05:44 PM

Slim
Is that large bump in the middle of the photo what your trying to take out. If it is the Makita should work fine. If the Makita is like the one I’ve been using for years make sure they will let you return it if it quits, because this tool is notorious for it’s owners not doing good maintenance on them and replacing the gear in them cost what your paying for the tool to start with.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1376 days


#12 posted 12-20-2014 06:10 PM

The wall cracked and started to lean – I tried digging out enough dirt to push the wall back up straight again but it didn’t work and it’s hard to get in there now. So my best bet is to cut the “bump” away. I’m sorry – my best bet would be to remove a section 4*’ long of the walll. Cutting slots would work for a year or two though – only that long because the wall might continue to lean – it probably won’t continue though.

Yup, I agree, the guy who wants to sell his thousand dollar tool for $200 probably ruined the gear. I guess I’ll have to test the tool on concrete before forking over any money.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3039 days


#13 posted 12-20-2014 06:15 PM

Sounds like a plan,I bought mine 20 years ago used and it lasted up until last year,used it all these years as a contractor.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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runswithscissors

2183 posts in 1487 days


#14 posted 12-21-2014 05:22 AM

I had to cut 2 holes in my basement wall for windows—about 30X30 for one, 26X30 for the other. The concrete is about 60 years old, and is hard hard hard. I did all the usual tricks, such as drilling 150 little holes, the diamond blade in a circular saw, and an electric breaker hammer (about a 25-30 pounder). Then I ran across a diamond chain saw on Amazon, an ICS, but I don’t remember the model. Paid about $350 for it, including chain. It did the job, but it wasn’t any fun. At least it could do plunge cuts and cut all the way through 8” of concrete. It was water cooled/lubricated, which makes a mess but keeps down the dust. Sold it when I was done.

So I just looked on Amazon and they don’t have any for less than about $1200. I maybe bought the last of the cheap ones. Some places will rent them to you. Of course you pay for however much diamond tooth you wear away. The chains aren’t cheap either.

Good luck. I’m glad my project is done.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View LakeLover's profile

LakeLover

283 posts in 1401 days


#15 posted 12-21-2014 04:45 PM

Look at a Husky Cut and break.
2 saw blades that make a kerf, cut, chip out and recut.

You can do square cuts into walls.

We had to lower 20 doors and windows on a house.

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