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Barrier between kichen sink & washer/dryer

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Forum topic by boston_guy posted 12-19-2014 05:48 AM 1419 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boston_guy

144 posts in 1611 days


12-19-2014 05:48 AM

I’m renovating the kitchen in my small condo (about 550 square feet). The project has taken forever!

The only spot for my stackable Miele washer and dryer is right next to the left of the sink.

This is how my washer looks like (I have to use these photos since my actual washer and dryer are stored away for now):

http://www.abt.com/product/40890/Miele-W3033.html

And this is my dryer:

http://www.abt.com/product/40892/Miele-T8003.html

The washer will come up to counter level. But the dryer will of course be above the sink in height. I’m trying to figure out what I could place at the base of the dryer to keep water splashes from hitting the dryer (even though my sink is quite deep). Keep in mind that the sink faucet will be on the left side of the sink, really close to the dryer. You can even see the hole in the granite for the faucet.

I experimented with having a granite backsplash or sidesplash in my case (if such a word exists) but it did not look nice. For instance, the granite I’ve used is quite thick (see photo below).

There has got to be something I could use.

Any tips out there? I’d really appreciate them!

 photo IMG_3042_zps4216423e.jpg


36 replies so far

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2105 days


#1 posted 12-19-2014 06:17 AM

Looking at the picture, my first concern would be the plumbing hook up for the washer and venting for the dryer.

Do you have enough room for them to stack? Are they stackable with the washer being on the bottom? If they are then you could create a partition between the sink and the units’, floor to ceiling in such a way to conceal them. Almost like putting them in a finished cabinet housing.

Oh, almist forgot, for now put a fernco clamp on rubber cap over the PVC pipe coming out of the wall to stop sewer gas from entering the living space.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#2 posted 12-19-2014 02:14 PM

I’d put a panel there too, IF you have the room. Could be a sheet of 3/4 paintaible ply and maybe tiled if you plan on tiling the space between sink and upper cabinets. Just pushing those appliances in will never look well thought out or finished.

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#3 posted 12-19-2014 03:34 PM

I don’t know what kind of space you have next to the sink, but if you have the space, I would consider doing something like pjones said, a finished cabinet housing. If you can spare 8-10”, a narrow shelf unit, could be built in the between the washer/dryer and the sink, and would provide a place for soaps, detergents, etc. That all depends on of you have the space, and whether or not the plumbing/venting is accessible (looks like a doorway to the garage or something there? Maybe you can move the hookups a little to the left?)

Otherwise, I’d probably pick up a piece of oak plywood and try to match the stain of the sink base as close as possible. Edge out the ply with thin strip of solid red oak. Use that as a divider.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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bold1

261 posts in 1309 days


#4 posted 12-19-2014 09:57 PM

Expensive, but a solid surface panel would work for thickness. Waterproof and you can prob. find some color that will look good with your countertop. Corian brand is prob. the best known, but there is at least 6 companies I know of. Google solid surface countertop material. Sometimes you can find tearouts at good prices. Some countertop installers scrape their tearouts, some try and recycle. Check your local installers, they might have something cheap.

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1611 days


#5 posted 12-20-2014 04:09 AM

Hi pjones, hazleton, BinghamtomEd, bold1,

Thank you very much for trying to help me.

I would like to pick your brains a little more, if you don’t mind.

Given the good questions you’ve asked me, I thought it might be more helpful if you get a better sense of the layout of the space. Please see the 2 photos below.

Please notice that I also have a cabinet above the sink. Given this cabinet, a major concern is how high should any barrier between the washer/dryer and sink be without looking weird?

And there’s a door leading to a rooftop deck to the far left of the spot where the washer/dryer are going to sit. This door is going to be replaced with a better one. Also, it’s going to open outward, instead of inward, as it’s presently designed.

But even if the door remained as an inward swinging door, there is still enough room for it to open completely without hitting the washer/dryer. But the space between the door (when opened completely) and washer/dryer is only like half an inch.

I really appreciate any tips I get. It’s a real educational experience for me. Thanks!

 photo IMG_3043_zpsea20f268.jpg

 photo IMG_3044_zps2c3621cf.jpg

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pjones46

986 posts in 2105 days


#6 posted 12-20-2014 06:52 AM

First, I would remove the cabinet above the sink.

Then construct a surrounding cabinet from the floor to ceiling or as high as possible around the stacked washer/dryer trying to match the existing wood of the sink base. I would space the cabinet if possible away from the sink cabinet to allow a backsplash of the same material and color on the left side of sink top and at the same heigth as the existing backsplash.

If the constructed cabinet is high enough a storage area above the washer/dryer units could replace the removed cabinet storage above the sink. Also, you could have doors on the cabinet to hide the washer/dryer if you wanted a more finished look. Install a can light above the sink or a hanging light might work well to make it look more appealing.

Remember to apply the trim moulding on the door openings to finish off the job.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1611 days


#7 posted 12-20-2014 06:23 PM

BinghamptonEd,

I’m leaning toward your idea.

I’m thinking that maybe what I need is just an end panel that matches my sink cabinet (red oak plywood sounds interesting. Did not know such a thing existed). It would go between the sink cabinet and the washer/dryer. If I go with this idea, I need to figure out how high it should be. A few inches above the washer or all the way to the top of the dryer? Also, what would I put at the base of the dryer for protection against water splashes? If I understood you correctly, at the base of the dryer would be a solid piece of oak (with polyurethane?). Or maybe there’s something with better protection from the water? I need to explore it some more.

In terms of staining, I did all the staining for my cabinets myself since I gave them new read oak veneer. So I have the exact stain.


I don t know what kind of space you have next to the sink, but if you have the space, I would consider doing something like pjones said, a finished cabinet housing. If you can spare 8-10”, a narrow shelf unit, could be built in the between the washer/dryer and the sink, and would provide a place for soaps, detergents, etc. That all depends on of you have the space, and whether or not the plumbing/venting is accessible (looks like a doorway to the garage or something there? Maybe you can move the hookups a little to the left?)

Otherwise, I d probably pick up a piece of oak plywood and try to match the stain of the sink base as close as possible. Edge out the ply with thin strip of solid red oak. Use that as a divider.

- BinghamtonEd


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boston_guy

144 posts in 1611 days


#8 posted 12-23-2014 05:55 AM

I went to my local Home Depot. They have Red Oak plywood sheets that are 4’ by 8’. I didn’t know that such plywood came in such large sheets.

Now I’m wondering whether building an enclosed cabinet for the stackable washer/dryer would be worth exploring. Maybe such a cabinet could have two doors: one for the washer below, the other for the dryer above?

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pjones46

986 posts in 2105 days


#9 posted 12-23-2014 08:55 AM

If you have the tools and desire, most anything can be done. Below is a shot of how one person did it:

This one has full doors that slide inside the cabinet so they so not come out into the room, but, needs more width for the sliding doors which is a problem in your location. That being said, if you built the case, pairs of doors could be made for the top and bottom to swing out minimizing the width needed. More than likely the cabinet would come out further into the room past your counter top due to the room needed for venting and plumbing hookup.

You might contact a local shop or finish carpenter to have it made also. Most anyone of them could build it in place without too much difficulty. You also might go to one of those un-named big stores who have a cabinet design service with your measurements where they could have one of their venders make one also.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#10 posted 12-23-2014 03:32 PM

I would have taken the panel up to the top of the upper cabinet and just added some type of cove to tie it together, but that jog in the ceiling above the door makes it tough. The door placement is problematic too, as you don’t want to walk into a room and be met with a big cabinet right in the kisser. I also don’t see a standpipe, and I don’t think you can effectively seal a washer discharge into a horizontal stub because the washer needs that air space in the hose for the pump to work properly. And where will the vent for the dryer go? It also looks like you need to move the electrical box further left if you put a plywood panel there. Stupid question – can you move the entry door about three feet?

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1611 days


#11 posted 12-23-2014 03:48 PM

pjones46,

Your last post was really helpful in making me see what I’m trying to do. Thanks!

I’m just trying to visualize how the whole thing will end up looking. When the dryer is stacked above the washer, the dryer is 3 inches below the cabinet. Maybe the cabinet can be built so that it comes right below the cabinet.

I like the idea of having a pair of doors so that a lot of space is not taken up. I ordered my Red Oak cabinet doors from an online company.

End panel or cabinet? This is the question I need to address. :)

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1611 days


#12 posted 12-23-2014 04:00 PM

dhazelton,

Thanks for your response. Let me explain something. The door you are seeing is not my main entry door. The main door is in the living room which is further down to the right of the kitchen sink. The door in the photo is my second door and it cannot be moved. It leads to a rooftop deck and at the end of the deck is another door which serves as a fire egress.

In terms of venting, my plumber and carpenter will be building a vent that goes into the wall behind the dryer and into the next room (bathroom) then it turns left and comes outside (onto the deck). In other words, the dryer will vent onto my deck. The carpenter will also build a box around the vent in the bathroom to conceal it.

Hope this makes it clearer to you.

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dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#13 posted 12-23-2014 09:48 PM

Are you still planning on just running the washer discharge into the sink? That’s what your original post implies. You have a stubout and would be much better off putting a standpipe in there. And if this is the sink you do dishes in where does the drainboard go? You could run a counter all the way over and put the dryer elsewhere, but I see the 220 line is already there. If you vent the dryer the way you plan into the next room and box it in you will have a really hard time cleaning the vent out as often as they require. I’m not trying to be a pain, I’m just not getting the big picture. If you have a carpenter why don’t you pick his brain as well? Being there in person with a tape measure to problem solve might be more helpful.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2693 days


#14 posted 12-24-2014 02:44 AM

The sink cabinet needs to be moved to the left a few inches so the door can be trimmed out properly.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1611 days


#15 posted 12-24-2014 04:57 PM

dhazelton,

Thanks for your response.

I’m not planning to run the washer discharge into the sink (I have a good plumber). There’s already rough plumbing for it. I just need to make the connection.

In terms of venting, the issue of cleaning it was already addressed by my plumber a while ago. The box will be constructed by my carpenter in such a way as to allow for easy cleaning.

As for picking the brains of my carpenter, I’ll certainly try to do that when he gets back to my place (right now he’s busy elsewhere). However, I find that as a homeowner it’s best to have as many options as possible. Some contractors only do what you ask them. Others only suggest the easiest or quickest solution. I’ve found the suggestions I’ve gotten here to be very interesting and I’m really grateful.

By the way, something has been in the back of my mind (it may be a really dumb question). I already ordered a new deck door some months ago to replace the one in the photo. When I ordered it I was still planning on having it as an inward opening door like the present one. But if I now want to make it an outward swinging door (to give me more room), is it possible, given that the hinges have been installed and the knob and lock holes cut? This is the type of door that has blinds built inside it. See photo below.

 photo IMG_3045_zps783d362c.jpg

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