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Is this lathe chuck for wood or metal?

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Forum topic by JoeinGa posted 12-17-2014 12:16 AM 2123 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JoeinGa

7475 posts in 1467 days


12-17-2014 12:16 AM

This chuck came with my lathe and in doing a bit of research on it I saw where someone had posted that this type chuck was for metalworking. I’m not sure if the comment was here on LJs, or if I saw it while doing Google searches about chucks.
Anyhoooooo, I’m still not positive on just how to use it. The jaws work independently by using the key on each jaw. There’s no name or markings of any kind on it, so I have no way to look up a manufacturers website.
Anybody got one of these? Do you use it with wood? And is there a trick to make sure it’s perfectly centered so the work piece doesn’t wobble like crazy.
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-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward


22 replies so far

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Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#1 posted 12-17-2014 12:34 AM

It’s for metal. It should be self-centering. Be careful not
to run a cutting tool into the jaws. They can become almost
invisible at turning speed. You can use it for wood, just
be careful.

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Todd Swartwood

257 posts in 1185 days


#2 posted 12-17-2014 12:39 AM

Hi Joe,
I’m pretty sure that is a metal working chuck. But with that said I see no reason you could not use it to work wood. The way it is made you can use the circles on the chuck to try to keep the piece to be turned centered.
Being independent jaws would make it nice if turning an odd shaped piece of wood.

Blessings, Todd

-- Todd Swartwood (Todd Swart-Woodworks)

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#3 posted 12-17-2014 12:53 AM

It’s an independent 4-jaw chuck typcially used on metal turning lathes.. although as mentioned, there is no reason you can’t use it for wood also. But with the smaller jaws, it won’t have as much holding power on wood as a typical wood chuck that has much more contact surface area. The jaws move independently so you can use odd shapped material or dial it in for zero tollerances (run-out).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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unbob

718 posts in 1363 days


#4 posted 12-17-2014 05:25 AM

Nope, its a woodworking chuck sold by Sears for their wood lathes. The spindle thread is way too small for a metal lathe, and its too lightly built.
I turn wood fairly often, but do it in a high speed metal lathe. The 4 jaw chuck is the best option I have there, and a face plate.

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#5 posted 12-17-2014 07:37 AM

Could very well be for wood.. but their old metal lathes had a pretty small spindle size as well.. 1/2-24 IIRC. Either way, it will still work for a lot of stuff a more normal wood chuck would (how much wood would a wood chuck… argh, never mind :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Wildwood

1882 posts in 1595 days


#6 posted 12-17-2014 01:48 PM

There are a few places to buy independent jaw & scroll chucks like this that are more suited for a metal than a wood lathe. Big learning curve in using an independent jaw chuck whether using contraction or expansion modes. Getting jaws torched evenly, & centered on or off the lath a real P.I.T.A. Hand holding work or chuck & and making wrench adjustments even with tailstock support not easy. Makes me think about monkey intercourse & football.

Would have better & safer results using faceplates, self taping sheet metal screws & carpenter glue & paper joints.

-- Bill

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3123 days


#7 posted 12-17-2014 03:26 PM

Would have better & safer results using faceplates, self taping sheet metal screws & carpenter glue & paper joints.

Agreed. I don’t know if this chuck was designed for metal or wood, but either way, there is no way I would try to use it to turn wood.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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LeeMills

271 posts in 761 days


#8 posted 12-17-2014 03:34 PM

Looks like a metal working chuck to me and I agree it will take a lot of fiddling to get it centered. Even then you won’t have a lot of holding power. It may well be a Sears, they do offer a 6 1/2 HP vacuum that runs on 110v.
It may be good to keep to use with smaller off center turnings.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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unbob

718 posts in 1363 days


#9 posted 12-17-2014 08:12 PM

Really that is a Sears chuck that was for wood lathes. But the same rules would apply as for using it for metal work.

Don’t extend work much further then twice the depth of the jaws without tail center support.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3665 posts in 1181 days


#10 posted 12-17-2014 08:28 PM

My grandfather had one that came with his metal lathe, the four independent jaws are to allow the user to turn eccentric parts and still be able to get the work being turned or faced true prior to cutting. This is time consuming to use on straight parts as a dial indicator is required to true the workpiece up before starting.

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Wildwood

1882 posts in 1595 days


#11 posted 12-17-2014 10:08 PM

I am not sure when scroll chucks became available for both metal & wood lathes. Cannot tell you when woodturners stopped using metal lathe chucks for woodturning, but many did. An equal number stayed with faceplates screws & glued paper joints, friction fits and jam chucks.

I did not own a chuck for several years, but major makers back then were Axminster, Nova, Oneway, and Vicmarc. Do not know of a North American vendor selling Axminster chucks today. Due to proliferation of woodturning chucks available today cannot keep up with all of them out there.

Back then remember when Glaser screw chuck could be had for less than $90 and came with a face plate without shipping. Friend had one and used it, great piece of gear.

http://www.glaserhitec.com/shop/shopping/glaser-screw-chucks/

Today that redesigned chuck runs $155 + $65 for faceplate.

The best chuck for you depends upon swing, distance between centers, and headstock bearings. Just looking at jaw design of modern wood lathe scroll chucks whether tommy bar or single key operated tell you they are a better op for gripping or expanding into a recess than any metal lathe chuck.

-- Bill

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2136 days


#12 posted 12-18-2014 02:34 AM

I used one similar to that in metal shop classes back in college. IT was heavier but the jaws are independent. In metal work we would chuck a piece of bar stock in it then turn a point on that. You took the stock you were using to make a part and center drilled it. put a dog on the stock and it would get in front of the jaw on the shuck. We center drill the tail end and used a center there. It worked well. If you wanted to chuck a part and have everything centered we used a dial indicator. Getting a chuck that has all the jaws working together is by far easier.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7905 posts in 1840 days


#13 posted 12-18-2014 04:49 AM


The spindle thread is way too small for a metal lathe, and its too lightly built.

- unbob

Old Craftsman metal and wood lathes used the same spindle.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7475 posts in 1467 days


#14 posted 12-18-2014 01:07 PM

With such differing opinions, I’m probably going to try it out, using a SMALL piece of wood. I’ll see how easy (or difficult) it is to center and keep balanced and watch for things like loosening of the grip. Might be a week or so, but I’ll report back what I find.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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unbob

718 posts in 1363 days


#15 posted 12-18-2014 04:31 PM

The spindle thread is way too small for a metal lathe, and its too lightly built.

- unbob

Old Craftsman metal and wood lathes used the same spindle.

- Rick M.

The Craftsman metal lathes made by Atlas had a 1 1/2” – 8 threads per inch spindle nose. They did have a smaller 6” swing that had a 1” spindle.
Now, there was the really bad Craftsman 109 metal lathe made by Dunlap that may have had the much smaller spindle thread as the chuck shown in this thread.
The 4jaw chuck shown in this thread is a wood chuck sold by Sears, it may resemble a metal lathe chuck but it certainly is not.
Just ask for further education on metal lathe chucks, I can be of assistance, and can provide photos.

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