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Forum topic by SuperCubber posted 12-15-2014 11:38 PM 1141 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SuperCubber

875 posts in 1751 days


12-15-2014 11:38 PM

Hello,

I suppose this could go in one of three forums, but this seems most appropriate to me. I hope I’m not misleading anyone.

Several houses are going up in my neighborhood, so I have access to lots of free, good-sized pieces of OSB (mostly 7/16).

I need to build a small cart/organized area for scraps and cutoffs. Since I have all this free material, and at this point in time, function trumps form, for me. I was wondering the feasibility of using OSB for some of these types of projects. I would probably double it up for the bottom of the cart to increase its rigidity. However, I’ve never really used OSB except for utility shelving, or as some sort of sheathing, so I don’t really know much about best practices for joining it with itself (ie: face to face, or at a 90 degree angle). From what I understand, yellow glue is generally a poor choice due to the waxed surface of OSB, so construction adhesive may be a better choice.

Thanks,
Joe

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine


14 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1784 days


#1 posted 12-15-2014 11:44 PM

I built a wheeled router table from that stuff and it’s still holding up. Unfortunately I don’t remember what I used to assemble it and I’m not at the shop right now. If I don’t forget, I’ll take a look tomorrow.

It’s ugly stuff though so I painted it to keep it from being an eyesore.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#2 posted 12-15-2014 11:48 PM

Have you been to the big orange box store lately? I have seen some containers made with 2×4’s and OSB for their displays. Looks good enough for shop use. They sorta resemble planter boxes. Simple and straightforward.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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SuperCubber

875 posts in 1751 days


#3 posted 12-15-2014 11:52 PM

Thanks for the replies, guys. Sounds pretty easy and cheap to go the 2 x OSB route.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1744 days


#4 posted 12-15-2014 11:55 PM

I think it would be more than suitable for a small cart/organized area for scraps and cutoffs, considering it’s free. Constructing a skeleton framework from 2 by material (2×2, 2×4, ie) and skinning the framework with the OSB using construction adhesive and fasteners would do the trick….

Edit
v
MT Stringer beat me to it
v


Have you been to the big orange box store lately? I have seen some containers made with 2×4 s and OSB for their displays. Looks good enough for shop use. They sorta resemble planter boxes. Simple and straightforward.

- MTStringer

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1492 days


#5 posted 12-16-2014 07:59 AM

I made a big bin on wheels where I toss cutoffs from various operations. I used 1×2 cleats at the joints. OSB won’t stand for edge fastenings. 2×2 would be even better.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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emart

422 posts in 2095 days


#6 posted 12-16-2014 09:42 AM

I made the infeed/outfeed tables for my Radial saw from OSB. About 2 years later the stuff started to disintegrate. As long as the skeleton is real wood it is ok for most things so long as the edges do not get damaged.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

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bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1818 days


#7 posted 12-16-2014 01:28 PM

I made a top for a shop cart out of it, covered it w/ Formica, it works fine for that. Not really sure how it would work for carcase construction, the edges are pretty rough.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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macatlin1

78 posts in 2410 days


#8 posted 12-16-2014 01:57 PM

I made a through the wall box for a window mount air conditioner for my shop using OSB. The material was the type that is used in floor underlayment and was said to be water proof. The piece in particular that I used had set outside for a year and although gray on the sunlit side it appeared to be solid. I framed a white wood box and used the OSB as shear panels with cutouts for the various vents. Everything was pocket hole screwed and glued with Titebond II. The whole thing was primed and given 2 coats of exterior gloss latex enamel. After 2 years the OSB panels still look like new and the whitewood frame is deteriorating. Who would have thought. I figure it will last another year and I’ll have to replace it. Other than the paint and screws it was free so no big loss but I did learn something. OSB can last unlike particle board.

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InstantSiv

259 posts in 1062 days


#9 posted 12-16-2014 03:07 PM

I made a bunch of organizer type bins out of osb. I used construction adhesive and brad nails. They’re holding up so far. I’ve seen osb used for workbench surfaces and they hold up fine. Not sure about using them for the st3ucture of a cart. Make one and see how it holds up.

View brtech's profile

brtech

906 posts in 2390 days


#10 posted 12-16-2014 04:16 PM

I’ve built a whole shop cabinet with drawers out of 7/16” OSB. It doesn’t rabbit/dado as nice as baltic birch ply, but it does it tolerably enough. Lots of glue and brads. Only had it a few months, so we’ll see if it holds up. Sure is inexpensive, and I got to try a bunch of techniques I had been wanting to learn.

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 891 days


#11 posted 12-16-2014 04:25 PM

A one or two inch torsion box for the bottom using OSB should provide all the strength you need.

Paint it if you are concerned with humidity affecting its long term life.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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Gene Howe

8262 posts in 2896 days


#12 posted 12-16-2014 04:38 PM

You don’t list where you’re located but if it’s very humid, best heed Brad’s advice. Oil based would be my choice.
Other than that, free osb is always good for utility use.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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emart

422 posts in 2095 days


#13 posted 12-17-2014 12:27 AM

I’m in Seattle OSB does not survive long here unless it is a roof or is kept in a heated building

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

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SuperCubber

875 posts in 1751 days


#14 posted 12-18-2014 01:06 AM

Thanks for all the replies!

The consensus seems to be “use 2×2s,” and “won’t hold up to moisture.”

As for the moisture issues, I live in the north west part of SC, so our humidity levels are generally pretty low. I never have issue with rust on any tools or anything in the shop.

Brad, I like your idea about a very basic torsion box for the base. I will incorporate that.

brtech, I’ve actually thought about making a few drawers out of them, since I have so much of it, and it’s free! You mentioned you used glue and brads. Did you use wood glue, or construction adhesive?

Thanks again, everyone,
Joe

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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