LumberJocks

Homemade wooden chuck for my 1920's lathe

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by Dan posted 12-14-2014 07:42 PM 6043 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Dan's profile

Dan

159 posts in 1426 days


12-14-2014 07:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe jig chuck headstock head stock home made homemade wooden wood turning turn

I posted a while back about my 1920’s lathe. One of the biggest issues I had was the inability to use modern accessories like a live center tailstock and a chuck style headstock. Today with christmas trees in mind, more specifically the stand, I made a custom chuck for my lathe using the wheel attachment I have for it. Here are some pictures.

DISCLAIMER: If anyone decides to make something using these pictures as reference, be EXTREMELY careful. A – Can only loosen bar screws so far or they will hit the rail. B – When turning, watch where your knuckles go, you do NOT want one of the screws to catch you. I will probably next be making a custom guard to block me from putting my hand where the screws spin.

This is the head stock with no attachment on it.

This is my only other option for the head stock:

And for those that have not read/seen my other posts containing pictures of this 1920’s lathe, this is the dead center tailstock:

Still trying to figure out a way to use a modern live center, but thus far my only viable option has been a fellow lumberjock who offered to make me a custom #2MT fitting for my tail stock, but I unfortunately have not had the extra money so far.

-- Dan - Wooden Treasures CT - http://woodentreasuresct.etsy.com http://www.youtube.com/woodentreasuresct


26 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1196 days


#1 posted 12-14-2014 09:41 PM

Put this thread in the Woodturning forum. I’ll bet there are 1 or 2 guys chomping at the bit that can steer you onto a chuck. That contraption looks pretty dangerous with the screws sticking out, but you already know that. My concern is the way you have it locked down. There is no way to keep it from twisting out of there if you get a catch.
Put a pin dead center of your contraption, drill a hole dead center of your work piece, then slip it over the pin, and lock it down. It will be a little more secure.
What size is that thread on the spindle? ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View Terry Vaughan's profile

Terry Vaughan

40 posts in 1623 days


#2 posted 12-14-2014 10:13 PM

Don’t know if you’ve tried it yet but it looks unusable. But the faceplate could hold a wooden screwchuck or a wooden jam chuck or a glue block. Don’t worry too much about the live tailcentre, dead centres still work, just put a bit of wax on the wood.

Terry

View Dan's profile

Dan

159 posts in 1426 days


#3 posted 12-14-2014 10:32 PM

Nubsnstubs – Jerry, thank you for your advice, I will add a pin for extra security. As for the thread I’m not sure, and to be honest I’m unsure how to measure/check that. Also, I will move this to woodturning as soon as I finish typing this reply.

Terry – Yea, I still use it with the dead center, my issue is that mine is heavily worn out (my own opinion and a few others from this site based on pictures). Although, I have not tried wax yet, any suggestion of type of wax?

Note to all: I would never even think about using this without the tail stock for added security of the piece, this is not meant to be a chuck to completely hold the piece on its own. I only had the lathe on with the tailstock not against the blank long enough to take the 2 pictures of it spinning.

-- Dan - Wooden Treasures CT - http://woodentreasuresct.etsy.com http://www.youtube.com/woodentreasuresct

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7933 posts in 1847 days


#4 posted 12-15-2014 03:49 AM

I looked up your old thread. So the homemade live center never panned out?

Your homemade chuck is too manly for me. It’s for people who will stick their hand into running farm machinery and that’s not me ;)

If you have threads on the headstock, why can’t you use a 4 jaw chuck? Oneway has an adapter for about every size spindle ever made. Teknatool has fewer sizes but are less expensive (if they happen to have your size).
http://oneway.ca/chucks/adaptors.htm
http://www.teknatool.com/products/Lathe_Accessories/adaptor_page.htm

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Dan's profile

Dan

159 posts in 1426 days


#5 posted 12-15-2014 03:55 AM

Nah, I tried multiple times to make a live center, none worked out. I may try again at some point. As for the spindle, I honestly just hadn’t thought of an adapter, I feel kind of silly lol, I looked online for old attachments made for the lathe, but never thought of an adapter. I’ll check that out, tho I’ll have to figure out how to measure the thread of mine.

-- Dan - Wooden Treasures CT - http://woodentreasuresct.etsy.com http://www.youtube.com/woodentreasuresct

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7933 posts in 1847 days


#6 posted 12-15-2014 06:04 AM

According to the Blue Star catalog they are 1/2”-13
pg 14 http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/110/755.pdf

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Terry Vaughan's profile

Terry Vaughan

40 posts in 1623 days


#7 posted 12-15-2014 11:02 AM

Dan – when I used a dead centre I used paraffin wax from a bit of candle. I think any wax would do. Make a small hole with a bradawl, scrape a bit of wax into it then put it in the lathe. Sometimes it scorches a bit but if you get the pressure right it works fine and can be more solid than a live centre. You might need to fix the driving centre if you find it needs too much pressure from the tailstock to keep it engaged. I doubt if the shape of the point is critical as long as it is smooth enough to slip.

Terry

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 2247 days


#8 posted 12-15-2014 12:16 PM

X2 to Terry and the paraffin, I’m still using the Craftsman my folks bought me in the early ‘60’s with a dead centre, no issues as long as you’ve got that touch of lube. That’s the way I learned turning in junior high.

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View Dan's profile

Dan

159 posts in 1426 days


#9 posted 12-15-2014 02:01 PM

Rick – Thank you for that, thats awesome. My actual lathe is a bit older, although it appears the only difference is that the one in that catalog shows the spur center having a center spike on it. On mine the center spike is on the threaded drive shaft itself, ans the spur center is essentially just a nut with the spur wings on it. Would your opinion be that that would not have been a big enough difference to change the threading? And more importantly… dont you wish a 48” wood lathe was still only $5.35? lol

Also just to show that things cost astronomically more nowadays, I looked it up and $5 1936 is equal to $84.44 2014, therefore by todays money value, that lathe would have cost less than $90. Whereas we all know for a good heavy duty 48” lathe nowadays your talking 4 digits lol.
1936 to 2014 conversion

Terry & racerglen – I will give that a try next time I set her spinning, I had bought some sealing wax a while back, just never got around to carving a seal with my family crest. Would this work just as well?

(Sorry, it rotated the pic sideways and I dont know how to fix on here)

-- Dan - Wooden Treasures CT - http://woodentreasuresct.etsy.com http://www.youtube.com/woodentreasuresct

View Terry Vaughan's profile

Terry Vaughan

40 posts in 1623 days


#10 posted 12-15-2014 04:33 PM

If you mean the sealing wax they drip onto documents then I should think no, it’s too hard. I’ve heard beeswax recommended, and candle wax works. Oil would work but will soak too far into the wood. Even with wax, you want to leave a little bit of excess wood to trim off later to stop the wax interfering with the finish. If you grind a punch to match the angle of your centre it might work better than a bradawl.

Looking at the photo I should say the centre looks OK, not too worn.

Terry

View Dan's profile

Dan

159 posts in 1426 days


#11 posted 12-15-2014 05:07 PM

Ill take a good close up of the center later, the point seems ok, but it appears the post used to end in an inverted bowl, and thats whats worn down. As for the wax Ill put away the sealing wax and use candle wax, I have near 100 tealight candles so I’ve no issue with losing a few to this task lol.

-- Dan - Wooden Treasures CT - http://woodentreasuresct.etsy.com http://www.youtube.com/woodentreasuresct

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7933 posts in 1847 days


#12 posted 12-15-2014 06:00 PM

Rick – Thank you for that, thats awesome. My actual lathe is a bit older, although it appears the only difference is that the one in that catalog shows the spur center having a center spike on it. On mine the center spike is on the threaded drive shaft itself, ans the spur center is essentially just a nut with the spur wings on it. Would your opinion be that that would not have been a big enough difference to change the threading? And more importantly… dont you wish a 48” wood lathe was still only $5.35? lol
- Dan

Change the threading? I’m not sure what you are asking.

And yes, even with inflation you can’t buy an equivalent lathe today for $85. There were a lot of companies making hobby lathes back then, really cranking them out. Most of those companies didn’t survive the Depression.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Dan's profile

Dan

159 posts in 1426 days


#13 posted 12-15-2014 11:31 PM

All I meant with the threading change comment was that sometimes throughout product evolution components change, i.e. the lathe depicted there technically has a different headstock than mine, they changed from mine (center spike is part of the threaded stock) to the one depicted in that catalog (center spike is part of the spur). Just didnt know if you thought that change may have meant the threading being different on the different models. It’s really a null point tho, I cant imagine it would be different. At some point I’ll just buy a cheap nut at Home Cheapo or Lowes thats for a 1/2”-13 and see if it threads on, that will confirm it for me without a doubt.

My other question (as I’m still new to the lathe) would be do you think the adapters on the sites you linked would work due to the fact that the center spike is part of the lathes headstock spindle? In the diagrams on the website it shows a spindle that ends flat like a standard machine bolt. On my lathe the center spike protrudes past the end of the threading, I’ll have to measure it, but ballparking from memory I think its like 1/2” or so.

-- Dan - Wooden Treasures CT - http://woodentreasuresct.etsy.com http://www.youtube.com/woodentreasuresct

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1954 days


#14 posted 12-15-2014 11:45 PM

Since I don’t have a lathe or do any major turning, I am wondering why you couldn’t use those eight holes to just drive screws through into the piece being turned.

It seems to me that you wouldn’t have to go far into the wood and you could use the dead center on the back end to keep enough pressure to ensure the screws stayed attached.

Maybe I’m wrong, but, then again, I did mention that I don’t have a lathe.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Dan's profile

Dan

159 posts in 1426 days


#15 posted 12-15-2014 11:54 PM

I’ve been doing that so far, however, the minimum size blank I can do that with is 2 by 2 square, if I want to turn something smaller or start with a one inch dowel or the such, I have to use the spur drive, which with the tail stock issues I have been having doesn’t work that well. However, that maybe rectified by the previously mentioned wax idea.

-- Dan - Wooden Treasures CT - http://woodentreasuresct.etsy.com http://www.youtube.com/woodentreasuresct

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com