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lathe speed setup

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Forum topic by goldenoldie posted 12-13-2014 04:08 AM 1850 views 1 time favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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goldenoldie

9 posts in 732 days


12-13-2014 04:08 AM

how com no one responds to my posts?


28 replies so far

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Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1666 days


#1 posted 12-13-2014 08:45 AM

Well I will bite…. Sitting here taking a break at 140am doing some glueups…

So what exactly is our question? Be more Specific….

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Sawdust2012

93 posts in 1177 days


#2 posted 12-13-2014 12:56 PM

I think you may be making the same mistake I did early on. Your questions are posted as comments on your profile page. No one would see them unless they looked at your page.

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mrg

659 posts in 2464 days


#3 posted 12-13-2014 01:47 PM

Yes, you posted your first two questions on your home page comments section.

Repost them in the forums section and someone will answer them.

Oh and welcome to Lumberjocks.

-- mrg

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Wildwood

1886 posts in 1599 days


#4 posted 12-13-2014 02:33 PM

Are you talking about adding a countershaft as seen on this lathe?

http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=16622

-- Bill

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goldenoldie

9 posts in 732 days


#5 posted 12-13-2014 03:08 PM

Thanks for responding to my screwup. Let’s try again. The setup for my lathe will be similar to Wildwood’s reponse. I want the maximum number speeds so I have a 4 step pulley on my motor ,the countershaft, and the headstock. My intent was to mount my motor on the bottom with a hinge for ease of belt moving. How can I move the belt from one step to the other on the upper belt ? Do you just force the belt or is there a better way ? I am using link belt. I am also thinking of putting my motor on a slide of some kind to get more speeds. Please help .

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Oldtool

2374 posts in 1655 days


#6 posted 12-13-2014 03:22 PM

You should have a method by which to tension the belt. Just take the tension off to move the belt. Sound feasible?

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

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Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#7 posted 12-13-2014 08:11 PM

You said that you were gonna mount the motor on hinges. Just left the motor, move the belt, done. What’s hard about that?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Wildwood

1886 posts in 1599 days


#8 posted 12-13-2014 08:15 PM

If go to link will see many old Delta or Delta-Rockwell lathes without a countershaft. Belts run from headstock to motor, and lift motor to reduce belt tension and move belt along the pulley to adjust speed.
Unless can find somebody that has their stuff in one bag to help you think will spend a lot of time and money without much to show for it!

If got to have a lathe with a counter shaft post your questions at the discussion forum at Vintage Machinery maybe someone can help you.

http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/bytype.aspx

We have no idea which Delta/Rockwell or plain Rockwell lathe you are talking about or measurements. You can only calculate speed by knowing size of pulleys & length of belts and few other things. Adding a counter shaft adds little bit more difficulty.

-- Bill

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#9 posted 12-13-2014 11:17 PM

I am mounting an old big 1 HP GE repulsion induction motor to my old Rockwell lathe. My lathe has a 4 step pulley. My motor has a 4 step pulley. I would like to be able to use all combinations of speed. I will therefore have to have my motor slide. Anyone have a good idea on how to achieve this ?

Wth the stepped pulley on lathe and motor, there is no need to make the motor ‘slide’. Lathes used that configuration for decades without problem.. you just ‘walk’ the belt to the different steps on the pulley. The pullies are arranged so they complement each other, wth the largest step on the outside on one, and the inside on the other. Motor (and lathe) can remain mounted securely in place with that setup. Adding a countershaft will involve quite a bit of work and expense and IMHO is not really necessary.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: To calculate the spindle speed, you only need to know the diameters of the pulley and motor speed.. belt length does not play into the equation. You can use this calculator at the vintagemachinery site to calculate what speeds you will have at the spindle:

http://vintagemachinery.org/math/arborrpm.aspx

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#10 posted 12-14-2014 05:22 AM

Forget all that complication with countershafts and switching pulleys, switch the lathe over to variable speed.
http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/2014/11/how-to-get-variable-speed-on-cheap.html

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Wildwood

1886 posts in 1599 days


#11 posted 12-14-2014 02:44 PM

MrUnix, using calculator at vintage machines will get OP in the ball park if he already knows distance between pulleys or distance not changed just changing pulleys. Calculator does not take into account belt slippage or other variations.

If do not have the old belt or distance change and need a new belt can get a SWAG using these calculators.

http://www.engineersedge.com/belt_design/belt_length_pulley_center_dist.htm

http://www.blocklayer.com/Pulley-Belt.aspx

-- Bill

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#12 posted 12-14-2014 05:12 PM



MrUnix, using calculator at vintage machines will get OP in the ball park if he already knows distance between pulleys or distance not changed just changing pulleys. Calculator does not take into account belt slippage or other variations.

Distance between pulleys will not change the speed of the spindle.. the motor can be 1 foot or 10 feet away and it will be the same.. and if you have slippage, then the belt tension is not sufficient and needs to be corrected.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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goldenoldie

9 posts in 732 days


#13 posted 12-14-2014 08:08 PM

I am trying to slow down my lathe to less than 300 rpm and that will not work if I only use two 4 step pulleys . That will only work with a countershaft setup… Without going to a variable speed motor , I will get the max number of speeds by going to a 4 step pulley on my motor, countershaft and headstock. I will make this work if I can work out the slide for my motor. I am also looking for a belt tension release for changing the speed on the belt from countershaft to headstock.

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#14 posted 12-14-2014 08:53 PM

Sounds like you wouldn’t really need too much to get it to work.. a couple of stepped pulleys, line shaft and pillow blocks. Wouldn’t really have any need to slide the motor either, and speed changes can be done by walking the belt just like you would without the intermediate shaft.

With a pretty standard 2/3/4/5” stepped pulley on the line shaft and motor, you can get the line shaft down to just under 700 rpm (assuming a 1725rpm motor). Steps on my vintage rockwell lathes pulleys are 2.5, 3, 4 and 4.5”, so using those, the lowest speed would be just under 400 rpm. Using pulleys on the lathe/shaft, or motor/shaft with a greater differential would get it a bit slower.

Curious as to why you would need to go so slow?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#15 posted 12-14-2014 09:35 PM

My lathe goes down to about 250 rpm but the only thing I do at that speed is apply finish. Unless you already have a countershaft laying around, my advice is forget about it. I looked into it once and cost + effort just isn’t worth it. You can hang a motor and make it slide, that’s not too difficult. Mount the motor on a plate (wood or metal) then you’ll need an arm (wood or metal) that attaches to a sturdy, smooth metal bar mounted parallel to the axis of your spindle. The tricky part is retro fitting all that to your lathe stand or designing a lathe stand to work with it. When I tell you to forget about it and convert to variable speed, it’s because I’ve been down this road of countershafts and sliding motors and it is just so much easier, cheaper, and faster to use a DC motor.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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