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14" Bandsaw tuning help.

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Forum topic by bdresch posted 12-12-2014 01:46 AM 904 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bdresch

121 posts in 1074 days


12-12-2014 01:46 AM

I am tuning up my new to me craftsman 22424 14” bandsaw. I replaced all the bearings and replaced the bent up stock spring with a Carter products one. I am attempting to coplanner the wheels and found a problem. When I install my 1/2 blade and tension it, the bottom wheel is .18” back from the top. When I tension my 3/16” blade, the wheels are perfect. Should I leave it as is coplanner with my small blade or shim the bottom wheel out so its coplanner with the big blade? Does that much deflection when tensioning seen right? On the 1/2 blade I only have it tensioned until the gauge on the back reads about 3/8. With the 3/16” blade I have to crank it to the 1/4” setting to get it to feel like enough tension to keep the blade on. Any help appreciated.


14 replies so far

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Tedstor

1625 posts in 2098 days


#1 posted 12-12-2014 01:56 AM

Let me ask you this? Does it cut well? If so, don’t worry about being ‘perfectly’ coplaner and finding perfect tensioning.
A bandsaw is a silly machine that will drive you crazy trying to get everything just right. Pretty close is usually more than good enough. Just get it tuned to the point that it cuts well, and forget about it.
I pay zero attention to the tension gauge on the saw. I wiggle the blade back and forth while I crank the tensioer until the tension feels “bout right”.

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bdresch

121 posts in 1074 days


#2 posted 12-12-2014 02:05 AM

When I tension the 1/2” blade, the guidepost isn’t parallel to the blade. That’s thr biggest issue. I thought I would check everything before progressing to that.

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ElChe

630 posts in 802 days


#3 posted 12-12-2014 03:19 AM

I’d tune it to the blade you will use the most. The one that will stay on the bandsaw. Your general purpose blade. As to the guidepost, mine isn’t dead on but I set my guideblocks and thrust bearings at the height I’m usually cutting. I don’t resaw much so I set it to cut 1” thick material.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#4 posted 12-12-2014 04:00 AM

Before you do any tweaking PLEASE view this video;
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View emart's profile

emart

422 posts in 2093 days


#5 posted 12-12-2014 04:18 AM

I have a much older saw and my lower wheel is a good 1/3 inch off from the upper wheel. It still cuts 6 inch thick chunks of hardwood fine. the main thing is to make sure the blade guides are usable and making sure it can tension properly.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3208 days


#6 posted 12-12-2014 04:47 AM

The video by Jumbojack nailed it.

WATCH THE VIDEO…

Coplaner is a old time wives tail…..he explains why you do NOT want to make the wheels coplanar.

He explains Coplaner starting right at 5:59 of the video.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#7 posted 12-12-2014 02:57 PM

I struggled with my bandsaw when I first got it. The first thing I did was buy a QUALITY blade. Then set the saw up using the methods Alex explains in the video. It is now the friendliest tool in my shop. I use Woodslicers and swear my them, but other knowledgeable Jocks use other brands and they swear by them. Just get a good blade (not from Sears). My saw cuts like a dream. THERE IS NO DRIFT. Oh, my saw is from Harbor Freight.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View bdresch's profile

bdresch

121 posts in 1074 days


#8 posted 12-12-2014 03:11 PM

Ok, I will throw coplanner out the window. Next step now is replacing my tension rod and nut. After a few tension/detension cycles of the 1/2” last night it’s starting to to strip. Any recommendations on a new rod? The engineer in me likes Iturra’s Spinner 4 with the cast iron hand wheel, acme threads, and bronz nut, but the cheapskate in me likes the $15 Peachtree crank.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2413 posts in 2388 days


#9 posted 12-12-2014 08:45 PM

Yes, what Jumbojack said! Watch the video and learn a lot.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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emart

422 posts in 2093 days


#10 posted 12-13-2014 10:34 AM

I use timber wolfe myself. just avoid the cheap blades you see at sears or any home improvement store. the money you save isnt worth the pain it will cause later.

one thing that is important however, is the stand your saw is on. I noticed with my saw that by throwing away the crappy stand it came with and replacing it with a nice solid steel one it had much less vibrations in it and therefore more accurate cuts. I worked at a place that had a ridgid brand bandsaw which worked ok but the stand was falling apart which caused a lot of trouble.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1912 days


#11 posted 12-13-2014 02:56 PM


After a few tension/detension cycles of the 1/2” last night it s starting to to strip. Any recommendations on a new rod?

- bdresch

Build a speed crank with a threaded rod,a wooden handle could be made if you can’t buy one:

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View Neptuno's profile

Neptuno

32 posts in 783 days


#12 posted 12-13-2014 05:04 PM

Here is my take on bandsaw tuning:

The blade should ride in the middle of the top tire. What happens in the bottom wheel is meaningless to the tuning.

Forget about the machine tensioning gauge, use the smallest tension the saw will cut straight.

Be sure that upper side guides leave only the teeth exposed, and check the side clearance between the blade and guide blocks or bearings is only a paper thickness. With the machine running, the back of the blade should touch the back bearing only when cutting.

Last but not least, the saw must be sharp. If you cut curves on plywood and MDF, the teeth will wear more to one side and you won’t be able to use that blade to cut straight on real wood. A condition called “Blade drift” will occur.

Blade drift, contrary to many textbooks advice, is NOT something to live with by compensations, like changing the angle of the fence, etc. It is the result of poor bandsaw tuning, and it is perfectly and easily corrected.

Pedro

-- We must all cross the line.

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#13 posted 12-14-2014 10:51 PM

I

I ended up cutting the brace off at the middle handle. Works like a charm.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#14 posted 12-14-2014 11:01 PM

Oh AND I ground some faces on the rod.
For my woodslicer 12 complete turns tensions the blade perfectly. At the end on the day I back it off 12. Takes about 10 seconds.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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