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Exposed End Kitchen Cabinet Carcass

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Forum topic by DBrown52 posted 12-11-2014 04:06 PM 951 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DBrown52

65 posts in 1195 days


12-11-2014 04:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cabinets kitchen

A question for all you cabinet guys…

I’m planning a set of stained face frame kitchen cabinets in QSWO. I was thinking of using Baltic Birch for the boxes for strength and cost and my wife likes a light interior (feel free to suggest something else if you have a better idea). For some of the uppers, there will be exposed ends where they change elevation and possibly depth (see photo). My question is what is a good technique to get the birch on the inside of the cabinet and oak on the exterior where it’s exposed?

Thanks
Dave


12 replies so far

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ShaneA

6474 posts in 2063 days


#1 posted 12-11-2014 04:08 PM

Skin them with 1/4” QSWO veneer ply is one way.

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jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#2 posted 12-11-2014 04:24 PM

I would just veneer the outside of the boxes myself. Oak veneer is pretty cheap. You can get a hand operated vacuum press if you don’t want to hammer veneer with hide glue.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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DBrown52

65 posts in 1195 days


#3 posted 12-11-2014 04:35 PM

Thanks for the messages. The idea of veneer scares me a bit. How hard is that to apply?

If I laminate on 1/4 QSWO oak ply, would I be able to cleanly flush trim with a router or will I have problems with chip out? Has anyone ever laminated 1/4 to 1/2 Baltic Birch to get back to 3/4?

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jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#4 posted 12-11-2014 04:48 PM

1/4 QSWO ply plus 1/2 Baltic Birch probably will be more expensive than just going with a 3/4” QSWO plywood.

For veneering cabinets, it’s probably too large to just use glue and put it in cauls. But, what you can do is to get a hand operated vacuum pump like this:

http://www.roarockit.com/rc_wood.php

Or, you can use hot hide glue and hammer veneer it. If you use a double boiler, you can get by without needing an electric glue pot. Just need to keep an eye on the temperature.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2550 days


#5 posted 12-11-2014 05:23 PM

I have just made a panel the same as the door and drawer panels, except the top is open to cover the
exposed ends.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

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Padriac Riley

36 posts in 738 days


#6 posted 12-11-2014 05:37 PM

This may be a stupid question but is it the wood itself that is aesthetically offending to you or the lighter color of the Birch on the outside that is the problem? I built the kitchen cabinets for the apartments on the second & third floor of my house and had the same decision. I just clear coated the inside to protect the wood and maintain as light a color as possible for visibility inside the cabinets and then stained the outside a richer and darker color. It worked out very well for me and set off the face frames very nicely.

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DBrown52

65 posts in 1195 days


#7 posted 12-11-2014 05:55 PM


This may be a stupid question but is it the wood itself that is aesthetically offending to you or the lighter color of the Birch on the outside that is the problem?
- Padriac Riley

Not a stupid question at all. I want the exposed outsides of the cabinet carcass sides to be QSWO to match the faceframe. On the inside, I want birch, so it will match the baltic birch ply I plan to use for the shelves and carcass sides that do not have exposed exteriors. I want to use baltic birch because it was cheaper than oak ply and my wife likes the real light color for the insides.

jmartel, thanks for the link. I’ll look into the veneer stuff some more.

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6474 posts in 2063 days


#8 posted 12-11-2014 05:59 PM

Gluing the plywood together is not a problem. They are only roughly 12” deep correct? One thing to keep in mind is that the sides of the carcass are now 3/4”, so the face frames will need to be at least 3/4” too. You can laminate the two plywoods then cut to final dimension before adding the face frame, then flush trim with router. That way you keep the inside the color you want, and still get the qswo to show on the lower exposed part of the cabinet. You actually only need to have the qswo laminated on the exposed areas. I did something very similar on the cabinets I am working on now.

The carcass of these cabs is prefinished birch and I added the 1/4 walnut to achieve what you describe.

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MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2696 days


#9 posted 12-11-2014 06:29 PM

For our cabinets, I used 3/4” pre-finished birch. No further finishing is required for the inside of the carcases. that makes for a nicely lit interior.

We only needed two end panels so They are raised panel to match the doors.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Padriac Riley

36 posts in 738 days


#10 posted 12-11-2014 07:33 PM

@DBrown52 Ah, that explains that then. Finishes like that on a bigger project are not even a remote option for us and so are not even in my thought processes. I will have to live vicariously through forums for that. For the wife and I it was what will last about a hundred years assuming we have the worst tennets ever and how an we fit it into the budget because we sure as hell can’t do this again in five years the way all the home shows say is normal now. It was 3/4” Birch ply because it was cheaper as you say than oak but sheet to sheet it also seemed to be a better quality than the oak ply and Poplar face frames.

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DBrown52

65 posts in 1195 days


#11 posted 12-11-2014 08:42 PM

ShaneA, I love your cabs. I think what you did will be the best bet for me. Did laminating the two pieces of ply cause any unexpected problems when it came time to rabbet/dado or screw together for the carcass joinery? BTW, I’m doing a traditional 1-1/2” faceframe, so a full 3/4” is what I want.

MT, I’ll do something similar to your end cabs where they’re fully exposed. Very nice work and thanks for sharing.

Padriac, we just have different purposes. Mine will be going into the house that my wife and I are building for ourselves next year. I plan to be in the dirt before the cabs go in the landfill or the house goes on the market.

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ShaneA

6474 posts in 2063 days


#12 posted 12-11-2014 08:47 PM

I actually added the ply after the carcass was built and screwed together. Helped to hide the screw and pocket holes. Probably a bit more of pain that way. I just had to take extra care when adding the face frame so that it was flush with the outside.

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