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Ripping 2x8 construction lumber

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Forum topic by SevenPin posted 12-11-2014 03:32 PM 1318 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SevenPin

14 posts in 834 days


12-11-2014 03:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

I’ve got a technique question. I was trying to rip some 2×8 lumber in half for my new sawhorses and a couple of them would bind up my Shopsmith table saw. It was almost like the wood was closing up on the blade from top to bottom. I have the upper saw guard with the kerf seperator but maybe the I need to have a kerf seperator farther back after the cut(?). The blade was a new Dewalt rip blade and all of the other 2×8s went thru without a problem. Could I cut halfway thru the wood and them flip it over to cut the other half or would that cause a greater kick-back problem?

Thanks

SevenPin (aka Rick Ehlers)


9 replies so far

View lndfilwiz's profile

lndfilwiz

90 posts in 1064 days


#1 posted 12-11-2014 03:46 PM

Many construction lumber boards come from trees with a slight bend. This can cause the lumber to bind up a saw. When it happens to me, I have some wooden shims I use to keep the board separated until the cuts are finished. I place the shims toward the far end of the board and if needed I will place another toward the blade.

-- Smile, it makes people wander what you are up to.

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6472 posts in 2062 days


#2 posted 12-11-2014 04:10 PM

You can flip the board end for end and continue your rip cut. This should not increase the kick back potential.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1814 days


#3 posted 12-11-2014 04:17 PM

Make a small wedge to put it in the kerf on the back side. I keep one handy by my table saw for such problems.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1337 posts in 2476 days


#4 posted 12-11-2014 04:35 PM

Some boards will close up on the blade when being ripped. When I rip boards I watch the kerf to see if the board is closing up on the blade; stop the saw; insert a wedge in the cut enough so that the kerf opens up and is not binding on the blade; back the board up a little and turn saw back on; finish rip.

Always be aware of what your lumber is doing when ripping … also where your hands are.

Work safe.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#5 posted 12-11-2014 05:02 PM

Construction lumber usually has a higher moisture content than finish lumber. That will cause it to bind. Construction lumber was never intended to be ripped. That’s why they come in 2x different widths. They can rip lumber in a mill more easily and safely than you can at home.

View SevenPin's profile

SevenPin

14 posts in 834 days


#6 posted 12-11-2014 05:06 PM

Thanks for all the replies. The Shopsmith upper blade guard has a kerf separtor built in but the lumber must be really tight since it bound up just past the saw cut. What I was thinking about trying is making the cut like a dado then flip the board over to finish the cut. Just not sure if this will cause more problems AND I won’t have the benefit of the anti-kickback pawls since the blade guard will not be there. I’ll try this weekend to use a “larger” wedge after I get the cut going and see if that helps.

Thanks All.

SevenPin

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SevenPin

14 posts in 834 days


#7 posted 12-11-2014 05:09 PM



Construction lumber usually has a higher moisture content than finish lumber. That will cause it to bind. Construction lumber was never intended to be ripped. That s why they come in 2x different widths. They can rip lumber in a mill more easily and safely than you can at home.

- MrRon

Thanks Ron. I was hoping to use wider boards to help minimize twisting and bowing. Out of the six boards I ripped, only two bound up on me. The others cut like butter. Like you said, must have been a lot wetter than the other boards.

SevenPin

View rantingrich's profile

rantingrich

372 posts in 808 days


#8 posted 12-11-2014 05:17 PM

I have taken a laser straight and flat 2×4 and done the same thing straight down the middle. AS the went past the blade they literally cross over each other. Damnest thing I ever saw. GET IT?.... SAW!

But no it really happened.

Also if it is BINDING up even with the riving knife and splitter installed the stock cold be twisting in a rolling fashion and squeezing the blade or could be pushing from the rip fence against the side of the blade

-- Rich

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8251 posts in 2892 days


#9 posted 12-11-2014 05:39 PM

A wedge, as soon as possible.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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