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Do any of you Lumberjocks Sew,too?

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Forum topic by Jim Jakosh posted 12-09-2014 01:52 PM 1069 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jim Jakosh

18699 posts in 2799 days


12-09-2014 01:52 PM

I was wondering if there are any other Lumberjocks out there that do sewing along with woodworking?
If so, what kind of machine do you use? I recently had to farm out a job to sew some tow straps because my machine can’t handle that thickness.
Anyway here is my $5 Nelco machine and one of my last projects.

This is a remote holder my daughter dreamed up to go over her big leather chair. It is 1/16” leather and it looks pretty ugly at the bottom because I could find no good way to gather that much material. Remember, I’m a wood worker but some things need a sewing machine.!!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!


24 replies so far

View Alongiron's profile

Alongiron

626 posts in 2387 days


#1 posted 12-09-2014 02:03 PM

We have a sewing machine and I would like to give it a try. I made a real nice Morris chair and I would like to make the cushions for it but have no clue where to start.

-- Measure twice and cut once.....sneak up on it! Steve Lien

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doubleDD

6274 posts in 1737 days


#2 posted 12-09-2014 02:05 PM

The only way I sew is by hand, and it hurts too. It’s easier to put a screw or nail in something to hold it together. ha ha
Next time maybe try rivets?

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1672 posts in 2318 days


#3 posted 12-09-2014 02:49 PM

Jim I can’t see and my wife is even worse. I get panic attacks just going into the fabric store.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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littlecope

3062 posts in 3196 days


#4 posted 12-09-2014 03:47 PM

Never tried but always wanted to…
I have done a little Leather work, but always used leather shoelaces to sew it together… Ran into the same Problem as Dave! If I didn’t have Arthritis before, I surely had it after doing that Work!

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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grizzman

7836 posts in 2997 days


#5 posted 12-09-2014 04:00 PM

jim, i learned to sew when i was in high school, the basics mind you, but i have a full understanding of how the machine works and i do know how to sew, when i need something to be sewn, i do ask my wife , but if need be i could do it myself, i like to learn all i can and i have no problems going into a fabric store if im going in for myself, as i know what im going in for and as soon as i find it i pay and leave…but if i go into a mill or store where lumber is sold, i can stay all day and if allowed i could stay all night.

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

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muleskinner

888 posts in 2130 days


#6 posted 12-09-2014 04:02 PM

Yep. An essential life skill in my book. My mother made me learn when I was 16 and bought a backpacking tent kit. Admittedly, it’s the wife’s sewing room but I know my way around it. If you have a sewing machine in your house, it’s just another power tool you should know how to use.

-- Visualize whirled peas

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Albert

480 posts in 3283 days


#7 posted 12-09-2014 04:07 PM

I am old and when I was young I was taught that sewing was for girls. That said I suppose I could give it a try sometime when nobody is looking.

Paul

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muleskinner

888 posts in 2130 days


#8 posted 12-09-2014 04:48 PM


I am old and when I was young I was taught that sewing was for girls. That said I suppose I could give it a try sometime when nobody is looking.

Paul

- Paul

A few things come to mind – tailors, sailmakers, upholsterers, saddle makers, shoemakers…

-- Visualize whirled peas

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paxorion

1106 posts in 1739 days


#9 posted 12-09-2014 04:49 PM

I do the woodworking, my wife does the sewing. We’ve built a reputation for unique wedding presents in the last 3 years.

-- paxorion

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3366 posts in 2779 days


#10 posted 12-09-2014 05:07 PM

I was in charge of cleaning and maintaining my mother’s sewing machine, and learned to sew in high school.
they did not have tall sizes in the stores then and long sleeved shirts were necessary in winter. I have a
Singer Touch and Sew and a Pfaff 332 in my OFFICE and couple of spare machines downstairs. Dad had
an old treadle shoemakers sewing machine, but my sister got that before I could. I was taught that you
did not pay anyone to do something if you could do it yourself, or to buy something unless you could not
make a working and good looking version of yourself.

-- As ever, Gus-the 78 yr young apprentice carpenter

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littlecope

3062 posts in 3196 days


#11 posted 12-09-2014 05:14 PM

@ Paul & Muleskinner

I was thinking of Battle Flags when I read that…
During the War between the States (and all Wars for that matter) Men not only repaired their own uniforms, but also were proud to Sew the Names of the Battles they fought in to their Unit Flag…
Men wept openly at the end of that conflict, when their Battle Flags were required to be surrendered…
Flags meant something back then!!

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1629 posts in 2707 days


#12 posted 12-09-2014 05:20 PM

Hi Jim

Here is a suggestion that will eliminate the puckers. First you have to get rid of the extra material. I’m going to use as an example a pocket that’s 2-1/2 inches wide and 1 inch deep. Start with a pattern like this:

Once you have the pattern cut, it will be assembled as illustrated below. The green areas are where you sew. All dimensions can be altered. The sewing areas probably could be reduced to 1/4 inch wide but for an example I’ll go with 1/2 inch wide sewing areas. This is the bottom view:

This is the top view:

Hope that helps with your next project.

And yes I do sew … and so does my younger son. He is an accomplished costume maker and a member of the SCA. Here are some of his latest costumes:

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

18699 posts in 2799 days


#13 posted 12-09-2014 06:07 PM

I figured some of the guys had to be sewers too!!
I got interested when I saw guy named Nate making all the cushions for new chairs in our model shop at All Steel in Aurora. He made me a beautiful Naugahyde pool table cover that I still use. Later I made a hovercraft and had to make the balloon skirts for it. When I got it all sewed together it was over 40ft long! That is what did in my first sewing machine. There were 3 layers of neoprene coated nylon that had to be sewed with rot proof thread. I felt like I was wearing that stuff when I had to feed it through the machine!

Hi Bluepine- wow ,4 machines. They are sure handy. They are to joining fabric as what a welder is to joining steel. It opens new doors to designs in the woodworking business, I think.

Hi Alex. Thanks for the sketch. I though of that but I did not want any raw edge showing and I’m not good at sewing that thick stuff in small places. I had a devil of time sewing the bottoms shut on this remote holder. Also I did not trust myself to figure the take up from each bend all the way across so I used a block of wood to hold the inside dimension on each opening and sewed the seam where ever it landed. I worked from the center out each way.
Your son is a real good costume designer and maker!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1629 posts in 2707 days


#14 posted 12-09-2014 06:43 PM

Over 40 years ago I sew myself a leather wallet that lasted about 30 years. When I did that, I used Contact cement to hold the leather in place and then sewed the leather down. That worked great. When working with material, you could use pins to hold it in place then sew it up but leather is a lot stiffer. It’s like using clamps to hold stuff in place while you screw or nail it up.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 2181 days


#15 posted 12-09-2014 07:08 PM

The last time I made a tow strap, (rated at 80,000 lbs), I used a doubled 4” strap, and an awl with poly thread.

I had to drag a semi with a load of furniture out of our back 40 with my little John Deere 870.
I had to use it as a ‘snatch strap’, where you back up as close as you can then hammer down on the throttle. The strap stretches like a rubber band then snaps the stuck vehicle out. I was afraid it would tear my stitching and break. I put a chunk of 12gauge steel up to protect me, but even after 3 tries, there was no damage.
The 4th try got the truck out and backed into the shop so they could unload.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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