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Automated Router Sled

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Forum topic by Ivan posted 12-09-2014 01:15 PM 940 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ivan

185 posts in 2840 days


12-09-2014 01:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Has anyone ever made an oscillating router sled before? I was thinking it would be cool to have a rig that automatically passes back and forth over a live edge slab (or other slab) to flatten something that is wider than my jointer.

Maybe even make an attachment for a ROS to sand the panel/slab without having to manually sand?

Thoughts?

-Ivan

-- "Do it right the first time, you'll just kick yourself later..."


6 replies so far

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SuperCubber

868 posts in 1747 days


#1 posted 12-09-2014 04:08 PM

I can see this as an Izzy Swan project…

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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JAAune

1640 posts in 1779 days


#2 posted 12-10-2014 12:25 AM

I have a 4’x8’ machine that does exactly that. It’s called a CNC router.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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SuperCubber

868 posts in 1747 days


#3 posted 12-10-2014 01:27 AM



I have a 4×8 machine that does exactly that. It s called a CNC router.

- JAAune

Yeah, and that only costs a few grand…

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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JAAune

1640 posts in 1779 days


#4 posted 12-10-2014 01:36 AM

Build one of the wooden CNC plans and it’ll not cost much more than any other machine with similar capability. No matter how one builds it, the fixture will have to be a certain size, will need some sort of rail system and an automated motion for the router.

The computer components for a CNC aren’t that expensive. It’s the materials for the frame and the bearing and rail assemblies that cost the most.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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Ivan

185 posts in 2840 days


#5 posted 12-11-2014 01:55 AM

Any suggestions on wooden CNC’s?

-- "Do it right the first time, you'll just kick yourself later..."

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JAAune

1640 posts in 1779 days


#6 posted 12-11-2014 05:21 AM

The website buildyourcnc.com is a good place to start reading. CNC machines are pretty simple but for a novice just getting started it seems very complex until you start to understand the way the parts work.

That website sells everything from complete kits, to partial kits to barebones plans and hardware kits. Kits for a larger machine run a little over $3,000. You can build a simple machine for cheaper if you make most of the parts yourself but it’ll take some research to learn that process.

I think Mr. Ron has some knowledge about building an inexpensive CNC from scratch. I do as well but my machine was done with more expensive parts since it’s meant for heavy-duty work.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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