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Forum topic by Paul Bucalo posted 12-08-2014 01:12 PM 1067 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 823 days


12-08-2014 01:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I found this discussed in a YT video by a woodworking peer who recently installed this in his workshop. The cost is very reasonable and since I have a natural gas furnace, and an unused connection in the dungeon, this seems like a good choice for me. What I am concerned about is combustion from wood dust in the air, plus the fact that I would have to locate this close enough to the floor to be hit with concrete and saw dust from moving around down the there. Is this a safe choice in a dusty environment?

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA


5 replies so far

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Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 823 days


#1 posted 12-08-2014 02:57 PM

I just got off the phone with one of my clients that sells and installs heating systems. They told me one of the by-products of ventless gas heating is moisture. Enough so that some of their clients have mentioned problems with tools rusting. Hmm.. So much for that idea. >_>

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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Gene Howe

8253 posts in 2892 days


#2 posted 12-08-2014 03:37 PM

Paul,
I’ve used the one you pictured for 7 years in my shop. No problems with dust or rust.
I’ve heard the stories about excess moisture but have not experienced it at all.
Mine runs 24/7 during the winter to keep our well pump plumbing warm.
There is always a small window slightly open, which MAY alleviate any moisture problem.
I’m in Northern AZ, but my BIL in IL also runs one in his shop and has no problems either.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 823 days


#3 posted 12-08-2014 04:09 PM


Paul,
I ve used the one you pictured for 7 years in my shop. No problems with dust or rust.
I ve heard the stories about excess moisture but have not experienced it at all.
Mine runs 24/7 during the winter to keep our well pump plumbing warm.
There is always a small window slightly open, which MAY alleviate any moisture problem.
I m in Northern AZ, but my BIL in IL also runs one in his shop and has no problems either.

- Gene Howe

Thanks for your experience, Gene. When you get a chance, take a look at my blog for pics on what my dungeon looks like. It’s a 100+ year old railroad boom house, poorly built with field stone walls and some bare earth in the old coal bin area. In the heat of the summer it’s a cool 62 F and very damp. Throughout the winter it’s drier, but the temperature doesn’t get above 50 F. Water seepage from outdoors still occurs even below freezing. To open a window, even a crack would, defeat the effort I am putting into sealing air leaks and insulation between the house and stone.

When I talked with my client, I found a better choice to be a vented unit, which drew outside air for combustion through the same pipe it vented exhaust out. The cost was too high for me. Nope. Will have to try something else. :/

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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Gene Howe

8253 posts in 2892 days


#4 posted 12-10-2014 01:33 PM

In that environment, your choice to not use the ProComm unit seems quite wise.
I failed to mention that a slightly open window is mandatory when using a non vented heater due to possible CO build up.

Would “base board” heaters, mounted above any possible moisture contamination (horrors) work for you? Maybe a ceiling mounted electric unit? Something like this one?

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Paul Bucalo

623 posts in 823 days


#5 posted 12-10-2014 04:37 PM



In that environment, your choice to not use the ProComm unit seems quite wise.
I failed to mention that a slightly open window is mandatory when using a non vented heater due to possible CO build up.

I was already aware of the need for ventilation, so you didn’t fail to mention what I needed to know. This was a concern of mine when I was first looking at the unit.


Would “base board” heaters, mounted above any possible moisture contamination (horrors) work for you? Maybe a ceiling mounted electric unit? Something like this one?

- Gene Howe

Gene, I know I have options. Whether they are affordable for me is the qualifier. Electricity is very expensive in our community. Also, my ceilings are so low that a ceiling mounted heater of the smallest size would blow into my face and I would bump my head into it. I think this winter I will have to stick with what I have and see how far I can go with it. I bought some tubes of construction adhesive (good to 0 F) and Titebond III wood glue that can handle down to 45 F. We’ll see how they work.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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