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Forum topic by Hellough posted 12-08-2014 02:07 AM 1009 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hellough

45 posts in 1780 days


12-08-2014 02:07 AM

Hello. Had a recent spark of interest to get into green woodworking (bodging), making windsor chairs, stools, spoons and other bushcraft sorts of things. I’m a sucker for good books and was wondering what some would recommend as a good book to better learn the basics as well as the more advanced work.

-- Learning patience quicker than I am the art of woodworking...


14 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#1 posted 12-08-2014 02:10 AM

Roy Underhill is a good place to start. I haven’t done
much green woodworking but I know how to do it
in theory from his books. He also had or has a TV
show I’ve never seen.

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Hellough

45 posts in 1780 days


#2 posted 12-08-2014 02:15 AM

Thanks, Loren. I have a few books from Roy that my wife got me a couple years back. I never dived into them enough to see if they have what I’m looking for. All I ever saw on his tv show was working with kiln-dried wood.

-- Learning patience quicker than I am the art of woodworking...

View Tim's profile

Tim

3119 posts in 1426 days


#3 posted 12-08-2014 02:23 AM

I’m not sure if it’s the right book for you, but take a look at Peter Follansbee’s stuff,
http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/book-dvds/

including the book Jennie Alexander and him wrote that’s considered fairly thorough and scholarly yet approachable:
http://lostartpress.com/collections/books/products/make-a-joint-stool-from-a-tree

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Hellough

45 posts in 1780 days


#4 posted 12-08-2014 09:31 PM

Thanks, Tim. I haven’t heard of Peter Follansbee but it looks like he’s done some work with Roy Underhill. I’ll have to check it out.

Loren, I skimmed back through one of my books and exactly what I was looking for was in one of them. Thanks for reminding me that I had them.

-- Learning patience quicker than I am the art of woodworking...

View buck_cpa's profile

buck_cpa

147 posts in 1353 days


#5 posted 12-08-2014 11:49 PM

I’ve read several books lately on building Windsor chairs – haven’t built one yet, just read about every book out there on the subject. For green woodworking, Mike Dunbar has a great book. You can find a used older edition on amazon for very cheap:

http://www.amazon.com/Make-Windsor-Chair-Updated-Expanded/dp/1440334811/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1418081885&sr=8-3&keywords=windsor+chairmaking

Not a green woodworking approach, but a really great book is Thos. Moser’s. I really like his approach as it doesn’t involve me chopping down a tree or steaming:

http://www.amazon.com/Windsor-Chair-Making-Thomas-Moser/dp/0806976306/ref=pd_sim_b_5?ie=UTF8&refRID=0PV75R2WTZJM9WNPFVFE

Peter Galbert is coming out with a new book on the subject. He was on Rough Cut recently and very traditional in his approach. He is doing his own illustrations, which are killer if you follow him on instagram:

http://blog.lostartpress.com/category/books-in-the-works/chairmakers-notebook-by-peter-galbert/

Drew Langsner is the man on the Windsor front also. He has two good books on the subject. One that never drops in price and the other that you can find for $4. Below is the expensive one.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Chairmakers-Workshop-Post-Rung/dp/1579902308/ref=pd_sim_b_13?ie=UTF8&refRID=186XPBTNY61A6GKWKMMQ

Lastly, check out any of Roy Underhill’s books. He has one book (can’t remember which one), which speaks extensively to building a bodging horse, making a froe, to eventually building a Windsor chair. All of his books area really good… thus, they carry their value on Amazon’s used market.

I haven’t read on any of the other subjects you mention, but I agree with the others on Peter Follansbee. Check out his website, really cool.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2283 days


#6 posted 12-09-2014 12:04 AM

All of the recommendations are good. The grand-daddy of the whole thing is Alexander’s book Make a chair from a tree. out of print, unfortunately, but libraries have it.
Otherwise I really like Mike Abbott’s books. His most recent is Going with the Grain. Making Chair in the 21st Century, and it’s great. Both of these books are primarily about post-and-rung chairs rather than Windsors, though I think Abbot has an earlier book about Windsors.
Make yourself a shaving horse as soon as you can…

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Tim's profile

Tim

3119 posts in 1426 days


#7 posted 12-09-2014 12:51 AM

Jeremy I would have recommended Alexander’s Make a Chair from a tree, except it doesn’t really teach a beginner how to do it.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2283 days


#8 posted 12-09-2014 01:06 AM

I agree with you Tim, at first I found it a bit frustrating trying to make a post and rung chair from Alexander’s book, since she gives no dimensions (basically says to copy a chair you like) at all. But on her website you can get a pdf that has enough specific information that I was able to make a chair or two. I haven’t read the jointstool book, though I’m sure it’s really good.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Hellough's profile

Hellough

45 posts in 1780 days


#9 posted 12-10-2014 09:22 PM

Buck, thanks for that great list. It looks like Drew Langsner has the best reviews out of those picks. I might invest in that bit of literature. One review said 300 pages of a tall book with no waffle. Sounds like a winner.

Jeremy, it’s been too long since I’ve been to my local library so I’m glad I have something that warrants a trip. I saw Mike Abbott’s book Going with the Grain on amazon but it looks like he attempts to incorporate power tools with the chair building process. Is that true? I was looking for something more pioneer-ish oriented. I have a shaving horse in the shop, but it really isn’t a comfortable design. Plan to redo it in the near future.

I really appreciate all the help.

-- Learning patience quicker than I am the art of woodworking...

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jdh122

879 posts in 2283 days


#10 posted 12-10-2014 10:07 PM

Abbott’s recent book doesn’t integrate powertools other than a cordless drill to do the tenons and drill into the posts of the chairs. And of course it would be very simple to just use a brace and bit instead. In fact I find the subtitle (making chairs in the 21st century) and the blurb on the back that emphasizes this a bit puzzling in that respect. But it’s certainly true that his perspective is less historical/preservationist than Langsner’s.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Hellough's profile

Hellough

45 posts in 1780 days


#11 posted 12-12-2014 07:12 AM

Ok, thanks Jeremy. I’ll have to look into it.

-- Learning patience quicker than I am the art of woodworking...

View Grant Libramento's profile

Grant Libramento

176 posts in 2444 days


#12 posted 04-20-2015 03:04 AM

For Windsor chairs I have always recommended Drew Langsner’s “Chairmakers Workshop” as the single best book on the subject. I just received Peter Galbert’s impressive new book “Chairmakers Notebook” and have to add that as a tour de force on the subject. Incredibly detailed and sure to improve the skills of any chairmaker, beginner or experienced.

-- Grant, Tryon, NC

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2550 days


#13 posted 04-20-2015 03:44 PM

Read the Roy Underhill books, especially “The Woodwright’s Workshop” Chapter Six-Chairs. I can not
remember Roy ever working with kilndried wood.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2283 days


#14 posted 04-24-2015 03:55 PM

+1 to Grant’s recommendation I recently bought Chairmaker’s Workshop (before seeing his post) and I am seriously impressed with it. In addition to detailed instructions and photos he gives measurements and plans for at least a dozen chairs (American, England, Welsh windsor chairs, plus post-and-rung chairs too).

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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