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Animal Blood Wood Stain

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Forum topic by bobro posted 12-06-2014 03:54 PM 1422 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bobro

308 posts in 778 days


12-06-2014 03:54 PM

Well, you learn something new every day. According to the old folks out in the country around here, animal blood used to be used to stain interior pine and spruce in farmhouses. The old Turkey Red color for cloth has calves’ blood and sheep’s dung as well as sumac and so on, so I would guess that there must have been some process and other ingredients involved.

At any rate, I thought it was interesting. Going to try ebonizing for the first time- the steel wool and vinegear sauce has turned good and dark after a week or so.

-- Lao Ma: You are so full of anger and hatred. Xena: Everybody's gotta be full of something.


11 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1188 days


#1 posted 12-06-2014 04:11 PM

The blood sounds like it would work pretty well, though I think I’d avoid using dung on anything.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8263 posts in 2896 days


#2 posted 12-06-2014 06:06 PM

For wood, dung makes a crappy stain.
Many of the pieces I make have been stained with blood….mine.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#3 posted 12-06-2014 06:21 PM

Seems like that would smell after a few days, but probably not as bad as dung.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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bobro

308 posts in 778 days


#4 posted 12-06-2014 07:33 PM

Well, they must have done something to it so it would keep and not stink, some kind of chemical process. Look at milk paint for instance.

-- Lao Ma: You are so full of anger and hatred. Xena: Everybody's gotta be full of something.

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bold1

262 posts in 1315 days


#5 posted 12-06-2014 07:37 PM

Ever hear of Oxblood Red.

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bobro

308 posts in 778 days


#6 posted 12-06-2014 07:44 PM

Yip, I had a pair of shoes in oxblood years ago. I don’t know if the name came from originally being made with ox blood, or from the particular color of red it is.

-- Lao Ma: You are so full of anger and hatred. Xena: Everybody's gotta be full of something.

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 989 days


#7 posted 12-06-2014 09:06 PM

Barns were traditionally red because they were painted with ox blood. I’m sure the smell would fade after a short while.

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3053 days


#8 posted 12-06-2014 09:24 PM

I think this would encourage bacterial growth.Things have moved on and have really taken a very scientific approach to stains and paints etc nowadays.Companies spend millions in research finding the very best products for todays woodworkers. I will stick with the newer stuff unless the old stuff produces a really miraculous result the likes of which could not be replicated with modern methods.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1725 days


#9 posted 12-07-2014 12:56 AM



I think this would encourage bacterial growth.Things have moved on and have really taken a very scientific approach to stains and paints etc nowadays.Companies spend millions in research finding the very best products for todays woodworkers. I will stick with the newer stuff unless the old stuff produces a really miraculous result the likes of which could not be replicated with modern methods.Alistair

- SCOTSMAN

+1

-- Art

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Yonak

979 posts in 989 days


#10 posted 12-07-2014 02:14 AM


I think this would encourage bacterial growth.

I think we’re talking about historical usage here.

View bobro's profile

bobro

308 posts in 778 days


#11 posted 12-07-2014 07:37 AM

These historical stains, dyes, and so on, were formulated to DIScourage bacterial and fungal growth.

Take the traditional barn paint: whether or not blood or some other coloring agent was mixed in, the main ingredients were linseed oil and lime. That’s preservative.

I have no intention of staining wood with blood, but I don’t think looking into old methods is futile at all. And what really got me interested in these things is that where I’m at, there is a radical disconnection from even perfectly normal do-it-yourself methods and people in the city.

I have yet to meet a single city person in the region under the age of fifty who is familiar with these basic materials of household, kitchen and shop:

steel wool
lime
cheesecloth
mineral oil

That includes the personel at the home-improvement stores. I used to think I was just getting grumpy, but talking to older folk and people in the country, it turns out that I’m not alone in this assessment, and not exaggerating.

I’m sure many processes are lost and forgotten for very good reason. Using mercury in the process when making felt hats, for example, which is where the expression “mad as a hatter” comes from” (brain damage, actually). But when you meet people who’ve never heard of steel wool, it makes you wonder just how much of the excellent gets lost and forgotten, too.

-- Lao Ma: You are so full of anger and hatred. Xena: Everybody's gotta be full of something.

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