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Forum topic by darinS posted 12-04-2014 07:59 PM 1083 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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darinS

678 posts in 2330 days


12-04-2014 07:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: alder bubinga mahogany cherry resource wenge walnut

An article on WOOD magazine’s website talks about using Lyptus as a substitute for Mahogany (http://www.woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/lumber/substitutes/?sssdmh=dm17.772851&esrc=nwwood120414.

I know there have to be more of these types of substitutions out there and apparently my google-fu is weak since I can’t find anything on it. All my results are coming up with things like TREX.

Does anyone have any place someone can find this kind of information or is this basically a trial and error type of thing?

-- They say many people die because of alcohol. They never realized how many of them are born because of it.


12 replies so far

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runswithscissors

2187 posts in 1488 days


#1 posted 12-05-2014 01:37 AM

Look up lyptus on Wikipedia. As one might guess from the name, it is a hybrid of 2 kinds of eucalyptus. Sounds like it has some nice properties for woodworking.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1939 days


#2 posted 12-05-2014 02:03 AM

Lyptus is a brand name for eucalyptus lumber grown and sawn in Brazil. It grows much faster there than it does in its native Australia.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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NoThanks

798 posts in 992 days


#3 posted 12-05-2014 02:36 AM

Look for a wood called Cumala (sp)
I’ve used it before as a cheaper imitation.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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shopdog

576 posts in 2949 days


#4 posted 12-05-2014 02:33 PM

Sapele is the perfect substitute for mahogany.

-- Steve-- http://www.urbanexteriors.biz

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bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1814 days


#5 posted 12-05-2014 03:42 PM

Each species of wood is unique and different. There are no rules for substitution. Price tends to drive it, everyone wants a cheap substitute for mahogany because it is so expensive. So several woods that suggest mahogany in color or grain come up. On the other hand birch and maple are similar but generally not considered substitutes because they are both similar in price and availability. Basically you can substitute any wood for any other based on price, characteristics, and taste. That is why there is no chart listing substitutions.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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darinS

678 posts in 2330 days


#6 posted 12-05-2014 06:47 PM

Thanks for all the information guys. I wondered if what bondo said was the case where you can sub one for any other and now my suspicions are confirmed.

Thanks again everyone.

-- They say many people die because of alcohol. They never realized how many of them are born because of it.

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shopdog

576 posts in 2949 days


#7 posted 12-05-2014 08:19 PM

I was thinking that you wanted to match the look of mahogany.

-- Steve-- http://www.urbanexteriors.biz

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3048 days


#8 posted 12-05-2014 09:46 PM

I prefer and use quite a bit of Sapele over the years.I find as it has a prominent grain running through it that it is often nicer than mahogany of course it depends on what you use it for.Have fun Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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darinS

678 posts in 2330 days


#9 posted 12-05-2014 10:32 PM

No shopdog, I was just trying to come up with different woods that could be substituted for others because they look close or can be made to look close. I guess that’s the best way to describe it. Let me give you an example ()and maybe I should have started with that).

I’ve read that poplar can be dyed to look like walnut (yes, i know it’s a softer hardwood, I’m envisioning wood for secondary places). So, if I’m making something that contains drawers and the drawer fronts are walnut, I might be able to substitute poplar for the sides, back, and bottom, provided that is the look I am going for.

I was just wondering if there was something out there (like a chart) that would list possible substitutions. From bondo’s well reasoned answer, I don’t think there is.

Thanks for all the suggestions. I’m always learning new things here.

-- They say many people die because of alcohol. They never realized how many of them are born because of it.

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#10 posted 12-05-2014 10:34 PM



I prefer and use quite a bit of Sapele over the years.I find as it has a prominent grain running through it that it is often nicer than mahogany of course it depends on what you use it for.Have fun Alistair

- SCOTSMAN

Sapele is really nice to work with and looks great IMHO…. AFAIK, it’s from the mahogany family and is similar.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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darinS

678 posts in 2330 days


#11 posted 12-05-2014 11:25 PM

So, would that be the best way to go? Try to stay within the same family? Would make sense. I just don’t know enough about it. May be time to google for more info I guess.

-- They say many people die because of alcohol. They never realized how many of them are born because of it.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1083 days


#12 posted 12-05-2014 11:39 PM

I’d start with anything that describes itself as “x mahogany” like “african mahogany”. The adjective indicates it isn’t genuine mahogany, but the “mahogany” indicates it’s selling itself as being a substitute.

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