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Forum topic by MedicKen posted 02-16-2009 04:12 AM 1247 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MedicKen

1599 posts in 2152 days


02-16-2009 04:12 AM

I was given a Walker Turner 10” table saw today. It belonged to my wifes grandfather and has been sitting in his garage for who knows how long. I was told that it was used not too long ago but it did blow a breaker the last time. I found the reason for the breaker issue, one of the arbor belts broke and got caught in the trunnion.
I dont know that much about Walker Turner. Are they worth restoring? I am in awe of this saw however, it is complete, right down to the original motor, rip fence and even miter gauge. The rip fence is solid steel and must weight in the neighborhood of 30lbs. It has a cast iron top with steel extension wings. As far as I can tell the only things missing are the rear cover for clean out and the knob to lock the blade height. Arbor bearing feel ok, no rough or binding movement and the tilt works well.
I got the saw home today and have completely disassembled it. Except for some surface rust, about 30# of saw dust and deteriorating wiring the saw is in decent shape. The model # 16-544, has a dual voltage motor 220V/110V, 1HP single phase.

http://s438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com


12 replies so far

View pitchnsplinters's profile

pitchnsplinters

262 posts in 2128 days


#1 posted 02-16-2009 04:18 AM

Go to Old Woodworking Machines website. They’ve got a ton of information on older tools. The contributors are real enthusiasts and will be able to give you very good advice. Check out the Photo Index, you can probably find pictures of your saw refurbished (with before & after pics).

Check these out:
http://www.owwm.com/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=5861
http://www.owwm.com/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=4207

Good luck.

-- Just 'cause a cat has kittens in the oven, it don't make 'em biscuits.

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2083 days


#2 posted 02-16-2009 04:41 AM

Just wih common sense, look how well are every piece manufactured, if everything was made with good quality/standars, you have a gem there…..A baldor motor, new bearings would be a plus

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

895 posts in 2303 days


#3 posted 02-16-2009 04:46 AM

I think you got a real prize here! Just looking at the massive castings for the trunnion and motor mount, I think you would be hard pressed to get an equivalent quality new saw nowadays for less than $2000.

Definitely worth restoring. It may look like a rust bucket now, but with some time and elbow grease this saw may be good for another 50 years.

As pitchn’ mentioned, OWWM is a great source of info (and sometimes parts) for these old machines. And please post some pictures during the process – I love watching old arn being restored.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 2152 days


#4 posted 02-16-2009 07:47 PM

Thanks for the help guys. After looking through OWWM.com I have determined the the saw is model TA1180B and was built in 1944. I will go ahead with the clean up and restoration. I dont know if I will keep the saw, after all I do have a 10” saw and I am limited on room. I will keep updating as to the progress in a new blog.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2363 days


#5 posted 02-16-2009 08:49 PM

I just received a different model Walker-Turner saw. Seems to me and the guy that I picked it up from that WT tended to throw an extra 50lbs of cast iron onto everything “just to be safe” The trunnions on my saw are HUGE.

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2363 days


#6 posted 02-16-2009 08:53 PM

I looked at your shop section. The craftsman saw you have is fairly nice, and you’ve done some good work with it. However if it was me I would fix the WT and use it, sell the craftsman.

You mention bearings, replace them no matter how they feel. Any sealed bearing over 15 years of age should be swapped. The grease solidifies. It might feel good but the balls will wear quickly.

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 2152 days


#7 posted 02-16-2009 10:20 PM

marc….......The craftsman will be going in the next year or so anyway, to make room for a powermatic pm2000. I may keep the WT and use it sparingly, we’ll see. I had planned on removing all the bearing and checking them will problably replace them now as it will be easier as the saw is apart. Where can I find parts? The guys at owwm arent very helpful.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2363 days


#8 posted 02-17-2009 07:41 AM

Aren’t helpful for what? They’ve helped me with a ton of things. From free small parts to hauling things cross country.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7739 posts in 2338 days


#9 posted 02-17-2009 08:17 AM

I like old stuff. WT made some saws comparable to a lighter-weight
version of the Unisaw. I don’t know what the small Unisaws
are called but they had smaller motors.

I think this is probably a comparable saw to those. Not comparable
to a Unisaw but still a nice saw for most work. I’ve never gone
all-out and restored any old machine but I’ve owned plenty and
fixed them up so they work good. I never painted anything,
just wire-brushed off the rust and so forth. Performance in old
equipment matters more than appearance to me.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 2152 days


#10 posted 02-17-2009 08:25 PM

hey marc…...........I finally did get some help and info from the guys over at owwm. I was a little perplexed at first when I asked questions and wasnt receiveing any help. I guess I jumped the gun with my last post.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2363 days


#11 posted 02-18-2009 01:51 AM

Ken,

It’s a large group and lots of people aren’t on every day. Some stuff takes time, but they know their stuff.

View woodyoda's profile

woodyoda

117 posts in 2147 days


#12 posted 02-18-2009 10:27 PM

Hey Ken, if you don’t need it as a saw….buy a flat round disc and turn it into a disc sander, that can be raised and lowered, and tilted (if you don’t have one that is)you can always take the disc off, and voila a table saw
again…...yoda

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