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Forum topic by AkBob posted 12-02-2014 03:58 PM 1361 views 2 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AkBob

201 posts in 2007 days


12-02-2014 03:58 PM

Every once in a while you find a video like this that makes your jaw drop. I just wanted to share it and for obvious reasons I am not affiliated with its production in any way. It does display a level of craftsmanship, dedication and skill I will likely never achieve but, none-the-less aspire to. I think what strikes me most is the humility displayed by these extremely talented individuals. Enjoy :)

http://youtu.be/WxP5Cg51qNs
or
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxP5Cg51qNs&spfreload=10


13 replies so far

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unbob

718 posts in 1363 days


#1 posted 12-02-2014 06:14 PM

I noticed in the video where the craftsman was trimming a corner radius, he was following a fine pencil line.
In metal working, “in the old days”, a part would be coated with dye, the features like a corner radius scribed on the part, using various tools on a flat surface. That was called “semi precision lay out”, the expected tolerance was .002”... from a skilled worker.

Those same layout skills are key to making the joints in the video.

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DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#2 posted 12-02-2014 10:44 PM

Really amazing precision hand work,

I did find it funny when talking about the case joint with the mitered dovetals….the announcer kept talking about the “Amazing angled tennons fitting into matching mortises that angle toward the back to lock the panel in place”
(starting at 3:59) in the first video.

Nice that the Japanese news actually spends reasonable time interviewing these artisans. Also refreshing to see they are busy, since it always seems much of Japan is “ultra modern” glass and brushed stainless steel, rather than fine wood…. but that is just my perception from my visit in 1999

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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JoeinGa

7475 posts in 1467 days


#3 posted 12-02-2014 11:00 PM

When I first clicked on the link and saw it was 28 minutes, I thought “No way”
But once I started watching…. I was hooked! Fascinating work!

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#4 posted 12-03-2014 12:47 AM

yeah, the Asian stuff blows my mind too. We’ve become
so enamored of machines as we learn the craft we can
forget that they are really just unpaid apprentices, letting
their common, linear limitations limit our own vision of
what we can accomplish. I use machines of course, plenty,
but having learned machines I only learn more when I roll-up
my sleeves and puck around with hand tools.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#5 posted 12-03-2014 04:15 AM

Loren I agree, that is part of why I really enjoy Roy Underhill, especially as he shows how to do the complex joinery by hand.
Not so thrilled to ploug narrow dado’s with a hand plane for a drawer bottom, but some of the dovetailing, like the impossible mallet, and the diagonal dovetail episode that was on this weekend was awesome!

http://www.pbs.org/woodwrightsshop/watch-on-line/2014-2015-episodes/

you can select the episode on daring diagonal dovetails, how to have tails on both boards for a corner! really clever.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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timbertailor

1591 posts in 884 days


#6 posted 12-03-2014 01:48 PM

You should have kept this video under wraps.

Its going to put pocket hole jig mfg’s out of business. :)

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3678 days


#7 posted 12-03-2014 02:16 PM

Totally amazing. Talk about feelings of inadequacy!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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JoeinGa

7475 posts in 1467 days


#8 posted 12-03-2014 02:38 PM

I also notice how that always DRAW the plane TOWARDS then, rather than push it AWAY from ourselves, like we do.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#9 posted 12-03-2014 08:47 PM


I also notice how that always DRAW the plane TOWARDS then, rather than push it AWAY from ourselves, like we do.

- JoeinGa

The same with saws….
Our western saws cut on the push stroke (which is why we need a thick blade) while the dozuki saws cut on the pull stroke with razor thin blades.

They are definitely great with body mechanics and ‘LEAN’ likely why everyone in industry uses the Toyota Production System. As the model for manufacturing.

Spend some time with a disk sander “tuning” this Zylophone in the woods.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c84C6YZirzE
<iframe src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/c84C6YZirzE” frameborder=”0” height=”315” width=”560”></iframe>

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View AkBob's profile

AkBob

201 posts in 2007 days


#10 posted 12-03-2014 08:54 PM



yeah, the Asian stuff blows my mind too. We ve become
so enamored of machines as we learn the craft we can
forget that they are really just unpaid apprentices, letting
their common, linear limitations limit our own vision of
what we can accomplish. I use machines of course, plenty,
but having learned machines I only learn more when I roll-up
my sleeves and puck around with hand tools.

- Loren

well put and I wholeheartedly agree..

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8238 posts in 2888 days


#11 posted 12-04-2014 04:36 PM

I’ve long admired Japanese joinery and their methods of work.
This video has vastly increased that admiration.
Thanks a lot for sharing it, Bob.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View LeTurbo's profile

LeTurbo

217 posts in 1045 days


#12 posted 12-04-2014 08:13 PM

I have absolutely no words. Just watching that strip of hidden dovetails disappearing so perfectly … that lidded box that just eases down as the air escapes … even the drawer that pops out when he pushes the other in … that stuff is so good, it’s air tight.

Oh, well, I guess I found some words after all. Still, I’m gobsmacked.

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3045 days


#13 posted 12-04-2014 09:36 PM

I think if you have the heart ,and head for something, and are in no rush all of this can be done by any of us given time,will, and patience.Do you suppose they did this quality of workmanship for the first time? I don’t think so.I truly believe we(mankind) and of course ( womankind)LOL can do anything, which is humanly possible and as we know this type of work is possible.I love to see these things but then I love art and craftsmanship of the highest quality.These men are good but not geniuses imho.Just people who have learned over many years to care for their art. There is really no other way, in other words if you intend to do this for many years making anything other than your very best. I should imagine that is the only way you could continue to enjoy it . Sometimes the challenge to do beautiful work is the real incentive and not neccessarily just more and more monitery gain.I do everything of course for free as it is my hobby which I have taken up when I was finished with my own profession.So I do this purely for the enjoyment and find it very satisfying to do so.I sometimes wonder if I would feel quite so passionate about working with wood after forty years of trying to make a reasonable living wage from it.I suppose in that sense I have been truly blessed.Also I am never rushed to let us say, have six chairs finished by friday.I would really hate that, and take my hat off to the real professional woodworkers who are faced with this type of challenge all their working lives. They in my opinion are the real heroes . Whereas I am purely out to enjoy myself. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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