LumberJocks

Suggestions on wood acclimation?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by prestonZ posted 11-29-2014 03:41 PM 1014 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View prestonZ's profile

prestonZ

11 posts in 2402 days


11-29-2014 03:41 PM

I recently moved to a new house in Georgia that requires the garage (my workshop) door partially open for the pet cat to get in and out. This often leads to high humidity conditions after a rain storm. I will be using a large amount of 8/4 mahogany to construct a large dining table. Should I acclimate the wood in the garage (possible high humidity at times) or in the house?

Thanks!


12 replies so far

View Bogeyguy's profile

Bogeyguy

548 posts in 1527 days


#1 posted 11-29-2014 04:00 PM

Get rid of the cat. LOL! Interesting dilemma.

-- Art, Pittsburgh.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3036 days


#2 posted 11-29-2014 04:21 PM

You might think about installing a pet door.It would be better if you could not have your door open .
You should let the wood acclimate were your going to build your project.
The longer you let your wood acclimate the better, I would try for a week to start and then rough cut your wood (longer and wider if possible) . After rough cutting your wood stack it with strips of wood for spacers (called stickers) and let the wood acclimate another few days before cutting to finish size.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1811 days


#3 posted 11-29-2014 04:22 PM

Install a pet door.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View prestonZ's profile

prestonZ

11 posts in 2402 days


#4 posted 11-29-2014 11:11 PM

Unfortunately, we’re renting the current house while waiting for our new house to be constructed, so I can’t really install a pet door. I think i’ll see if I can keep the door closed for brief periods during rain storms to cut down on the standing water at the edge of the garage.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1946 days


#5 posted 11-29-2014 11:42 PM

If the door has to be open, hang a piece of plastic or canvas or tarp to stop the airflow. Cut a hole in it, leaving the top of the hole uncut.
Teach the kitty person where the hole is. It won’t take them long to learn.
To get fancier, build a frame along the bottom, staple the plastic to it, build a pet door.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1080 days


#6 posted 11-30-2014 12:36 AM

Unless you have active dehumidification or central air or heat in your garage, the humidity is likely to be similar to the outside whether you have the door open or not. The temp may be different, but I’d be surprised if the humidity was more than 5% off of outdoors.

View splatman's profile

splatman

557 posts in 858 days


#7 posted 11-30-2014 04:13 AM

Acclimate the wood in the dining room. Stack it along a wall.

View bold1's profile

bold1

261 posts in 1306 days


#8 posted 11-30-2014 04:44 AM

LiveEdge is right. It will take time for the dry lumber to pick any amount of moisture. Unless the house is going to have a long term difference in humidity from the garage don’t worry about it. If wood isn’t dry it will shrink till it stabilizes and once stabilized it will expand and contract, but not quickly unless there is a marked difference in the level of humidity.

View yank's profile

yank

57 posts in 3592 days


#9 posted 12-02-2014 01:57 AM



Unless you have active dehumidification or central air or heat in your garage, the humidity is likely to be similar to the outside whether you have the door open or not. The temp may be different, but I d be surprised if the humidity was more than 5% off of outdoors.

- LiveEdge


-- My Father was my mentor for my woodworking hobby and knowledge. Luv ya Dad.

View yank's profile

yank

57 posts in 3592 days


#10 posted 12-02-2014 02:02 AM

TYPICALLY a garage is not usually included in the HVAC system on a house. The tarp, or a build up of the space you want to leave open for the kitty, simple quarter inch or 3/4 inch ply attached to the bottom of the door the lenght of the door.and install a pet door. For security, I would install a bolt in the track to prevent it from opening by an intruder.

-- My Father was my mentor for my woodworking hobby and knowledge. Luv ya Dad.

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

303 posts in 1921 days


#11 posted 12-02-2014 02:08 AM



You might think about installing a pet door.It would be better if you could not have your door open .
You should let the wood acclimate were your going to build your project.
The longer you let your wood acclimate the better, I would try for a week to start and then rough cut your wood (longer and wider if possible) . After rough cutting your wood stack it with strips of wood for spacers (called stickers) and let the wood acclimate another few days before cutting to finish size.

- a1Jim

Yep. But I’d sticker that stock in the garage, rough size, sticker, then final dimension. My guess in Georgia is always humid, so a breeze is not gonna make of break a piece that has accounted for seasonal wood movement.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3036 days


#12 posted 12-02-2014 02:23 AM

BLarge

The point is not “a breeze” but air flow around wood,even in Georgia. Wood is like a piece of bread,if left flat on a counter top, the top side of the bread is all dried out and the bottom of the bread is still moist . When wood drys on one side and not the other it cups of twist, this is why you don’t leave wood laying flat on a bench to acclimate.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com