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Forum topic by Gene Howe posted 11-28-2014 12:30 PM 1341 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gene Howe

8239 posts in 2890 days


11-28-2014 12:30 PM

Had an opportunity to use my recently acquired Stew-Mac scrapers on some walnut inlaid curly maple drawer fronts.
The walnut is a 1/4” strip lengthwise on the drawer front that forms pulls as it passes over two forstner formed recesses. I used the scraper to level the walnut even with the maple.
These little scrapers are designed for luthiers’ use but, they are great for small smoothing tasks on any project. Especially on hard to work wood like curly maple.
I especially like the heft of these. They are about 3/16 thick and have divots in the sides for your thumbs. Far more comfortable to use than a traditional thin scraper.
Here is their site.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton


18 replies so far

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

13495 posts in 1821 days


#1 posted 11-28-2014 12:45 PM

Nice scraper Gene but we want to see the drawer front…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

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Gene Howe

8239 posts in 2890 days


#2 posted 11-28-2014 01:25 PM

Maybe later, Marty.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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lew

11336 posts in 3216 days


#3 posted 11-28-2014 02:07 PM

They look very nice. I was wondering how you would sharpen them.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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firefighterontheside

13450 posts in 1318 days


#4 posted 11-28-2014 02:14 PM

I looked at these when Eddie first mentioned them. I’m tempted but I don’t have a decent grinder.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Gene Howe

8239 posts in 2890 days


#5 posted 11-28-2014 02:25 PM

Lew,
Here's an excellent video from Stew-Mac that shows how to sharpen it.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

3019 posts in 1713 days


#6 posted 11-28-2014 02:48 PM

LJ gfadvm (Andy) uses them. I bought a set of the three shapes with an extra one of the large “oval” one for a luthier friend of mine. So far, the only thing I’ve scraped is a small area of my workbench. I’ll need to get the hang of using it vertically without chattering. More practice is needed.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View R_Stad's profile

R_Stad

374 posts in 1304 days


#7 posted 11-28-2014 03:15 PM

They are very nice scrappers Gene. Roger Bean wrote a very detailed review that I found convincing enough to purchase them too. Thanks for the post.
http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3858

-- Rod - Oregon

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17135 posts in 2567 days


#8 posted 11-28-2014 05:59 PM

They look like really nice tools. I have had a need for one a time or two. I may buy some, too!!

Thanks, Gene….................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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ElChe

630 posts in 798 days


#9 posted 11-29-2014 02:02 AM

I am wondering if I could make them from tool steel like this and what it would take to cut the steel. They sell up to 1/8” thick stock in various widths.
http://www.victornet.com/subdepartments/flat-ground-stock-up-to-1/8-thick/970.html

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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timbertailor

1591 posts in 885 days


#10 posted 11-29-2014 02:59 AM

Nice find Gene.

Stewart McDonald has a lot of interesting tools and hardware.

Some good instructional videos, as well.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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Roger

19867 posts in 2265 days


#11 posted 12-06-2014 12:15 AM

Looks interesting. Thnx for the link

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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OSU55

1056 posts in 1451 days


#12 posted 12-09-2014 04:40 PM

Think I’ll stick with the various thin scrapers and scraper holder. Appears the traditional method of scraper sharpening will yield a sharper, finer edge vs these thick scrapers. Thinner scrapers can be left with the same type edge one will get with these thick ones. I use smoothing planes to get flat and smooth, and card scrapers for very light material removal. Appears these thick scrapers are more for replacing a smoothing plane vs card scrapers. I may be missing something, but I don’t see a place for these.

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Gene Howe

8239 posts in 2890 days


#13 posted 12-09-2014 04:55 PM

Different strokes, I guess.
They are designed for smaller work, specifically for stringed instruments.
I use both the traditional card scrapers and, even glass at times, as well as the Stew-Macs, for smaller stuff.
The Stew-macs hold an edge far longer than a card scraper and are much faster to sharpen. One pass across a composite wheel and it’s done.


Think I ll stick with the various thin scrapers and scraper holder. Appears the traditional method of scraper sharpening will yield a sharper, finer edge vs these thick scrapers. Thinner scrapers can be left with the same type edge one will get with these thick ones. I use smoothing planes to get flat and smooth, and card scrapers for very light material removal. Appears these thick scrapers are more for replacing a smoothing plane vs card scrapers. I may be missing something, but I don t see a place for these.

- OSU55


-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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OSU55

1056 posts in 1451 days


#14 posted 12-09-2014 10:04 PM

I watched the video, and the guy was using it on a fair sized piece of wood, certainly large enough for my small and medium sized planes, and I didn’t see him use one on a small piece. If they are for smaller stuff, one would think it would be in the video. I will correct something stated in the video, or maybe I heard it incorrectly – that something with Rc 62-63 hardness can’t have a burr burnished – it can, I do so with a Veritas A2 scraper blade, but it has a 45° bevel. Also, a carbide burnisher won’t be affected by tool steel. I agree these thick scrapers, at that hardness, could not be burnished to raise a burr.

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eddie

8433 posts in 2075 days


#15 posted 12-18-2014 03:49 PM

Gene i have used these on several types of wood and they are the best of scrappers ,been meaning to do a review of them myself ,well worth the money ,still using the same edge for a while now ,a lot easier to sharpen too

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

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