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Extracting dye from scrapwood

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Forum topic by Purrmaster posted 11-26-2014 08:22 AM 923 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Purrmaster

914 posts in 1555 days


11-26-2014 08:22 AM

I’ve been working with padauk for the first time. I like the bright orange color. So I had an idea. I took pieces of scrapwood and sanding dust from the padauk and put them in a jar with some denatured alcohol. My hope is to be able to get the dye from the wood and then brush it on something later. Since it’s scrap I have nothing to lose.

Has anyone else tried this? Did it work?


14 replies so far

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bobro

308 posts in 772 days


#1 posted 11-26-2014 08:25 AM

Red dye for cloth used to be made from brazilwood, pernambuco, probably in a similar way. So the idea and process is certainly valid, but I would guess that padouk dye will darken and dull as quickly as the wood itself does.

-- Lao Ma: You are so full of anger and hatred. Xena: Everybody's gotta be full of something.

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Purrmaster

914 posts in 1555 days


#2 posted 11-26-2014 09:18 PM

Yes, I’m sure you’re right. It might, in fact, darken even faster. In the jar the stuff already looks red instead of orange.

Still, once I stain it I’m curious as to how it will work. Assuming, of course, that it does.

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summerfi

3315 posts in 1149 days


#3 posted 11-26-2014 09:24 PM

I’ve done this with lathe shavings from Bolivian rosewood and purpleheart. Works pretty well, though the dye is weak and probably needs to evaporate down some to be more concentrated. Haven’t tested it over time to see if the color maintains.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- Rocky Mountain Saw Works http://www.rmsaws.com/p/about-us.html

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FancyShoes

506 posts in 826 days


#4 posted 11-26-2014 11:24 PM

Why would you want to extract dye?

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Purrmaster

914 posts in 1555 days


#5 posted 11-30-2014 01:05 AM

I’m doing it mostly as an experiment. I can try slapping the dye on something else to attempt to replicate the color of padauk. I’m sure it won’t be as color fast as an aniline dye. But all it takes is a little alcohol and a jar. I may try it with mineral spirits to see what happens.

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Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#6 posted 11-30-2014 05:33 AM

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Purrmaster

914 posts in 1555 days


#7 posted 12-10-2014 11:43 AM

I took a look at your blog post. That’s pretty damn fantastic. How long did you have to soak the scraps? Did you try anything other than lacquer thinner as the solvent? How many coats did it take to get the color you wanted?

Right now I decanted the solution of padauk dye and put in blood wood scraps instead. I’m curious as to what the result will be. Now I just need to figure out what to use it on. I’m mildly tempted to try it on maple.

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Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#8 posted 12-10-2014 08:34 PM

Not sure how long I soaked them but the color leaches out pretty quickly. I chose lacquer thinner because it evaporates fairly quickly but slower than alcohol which would also probably work. The rocket ship received one coat of dye.

Over a long period of time, particles accumulate in the bottom of the jar. Not sure if that is because I left the wood chips in too long or if they are precipitating from the solution.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Purrmaster

914 posts in 1555 days


#9 posted 12-11-2014 02:35 AM

Interesting… I think I grabbed alcohol because it was what was in front of me. In retrospect I should have used lacquer thinner as you did. I really would have preferred mineral spirits because it evaporates slowly but not too slowly. I figured it wouldn’t have enough punch to extract the dye.

I tested the dye and I didn’t get nearly as powerful a color as you did. The color I got was lightish pink. I guess they have to soak longer. Or perhaps I need to change out the scrap periodically. It looks more potent in the jar than it looks on the wood.

What wood did you put it on? I’m trying to think of a way to use this stuff to pretty up some boring, cheap wood.

I noticed the particles as well. I don’t know the source but I used a paint strainer to strain the dye and that seemed to remove them for the most part.

I’m tempted to try the stuff on some maple but I rather like the look of maple and changing it might be stupid.

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Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#10 posted 12-11-2014 03:58 AM

Looking back at my blog the chips were soaking a couple months before I used the dye but it didn’t take that long for the color to leach out, maybe days or a week. I used several padauk chips about 1+” square and 1/16” thick. The dye worked well on pine without splotching, so it should work on pretty much anything.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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bluplanet

37 posts in 2124 days


#11 posted 12-14-2014 03:57 AM

The color may not last. If you leave the color in the paduk wood and just let the wood sit for a while, it turns to a brown color. I have several pieces. I’m in the process of making a set of screw clamps out of them (like Jorgensens). The wood has turned sort of chocolate brown. I don’t know if it’s oxydizing or what.

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Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#12 posted 12-14-2014 05:03 AM

Been 7 months, any change in color is imperceptible by me though I would expect it to change color eventually as all wood will. The most color change will come from UV.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Purrmaster

914 posts in 1555 days


#13 posted 12-15-2014 02:16 PM

When you say the color leeched out do you mean the chips you put in actually lost their color? My chips appear to be the same color as they were when I put them in but the solvent has clearly taken on some color. I’m trying bloodwood with lacquer thinner and padauk with denatured alcohol. (Like a moron I spilled my previous dye batch and had to start over).

I’m also trying bubinga with mineral spirits but so far the mineral spirits are almost totally unchanged in color. I don’t know whether the problem is the solvent or the bubinga or both.

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Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#14 posted 12-15-2014 06:01 PM


When you say the color leeched out do you mean the chips you put in actually lost their color?

- Purrmaster

Exactly, they came out a washed out pinkish color.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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