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repairing a wrong routing

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Forum topic by Shuja posted 11-25-2014 03:13 PM 851 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Shuja

266 posts in 1028 days


11-25-2014 03:13 PM

New to routing. I was making a groove. Unfortunately I overshot the line. How can I repair it? I want-to either wax the final product or varnish it. I dont want to paint it. somebody help.

-- shuja


12 replies so far

View Case101's profile

Case101

107 posts in 1254 days


#1 posted 11-25-2014 03:15 PM

need more info, picture?

-- John, New Jersey

View FellingStudio's profile

FellingStudio

93 posts in 1144 days


#2 posted 11-25-2014 03:21 PM

You need to replace the wood or make a new part or incorporate the mistake into your design.

Replace the wood by using a filler product of some type (the mistake will be obvious) or by gluing in a piece of wood (which will be less obvious). If you choose to glue in a piece of wood it can be done almost invisibly if you choose a patch that matches in color and grain. Hopefully you have some leftover stock to pick from. This type of repair is called a Dutchman, google it, I expect that you will find some good tips.

-- Jesse Felling - http://www.fellingstudio.com

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#3 posted 11-25-2014 03:26 PM

I did something similar when I routed the wrong side of the line for a hinge mortise on a baby gate. I think a groove might be even easier to fix, so that’s good. I’m assuming by overshot, you mean the groove is too wide. If the side you overshot on is not a smooth square edge, use the router to make one. Glue in a strip of the same wood, try to match color and grain direction as much as possible, then sand/plane it flush. Then, re-rout the groove as you intended it to be, like you never even made that mistake. When I fixed my mortise, it was in walnut, I chiseled the error square, then cut a patch to fit in the square. You wouldn’t notice it unless I pointed it out (also helps that it’s hidden most of the time). Chances are, assuming the groove it set to accept a shelf or something, it’ll be in a corner where it’s even less noticeable.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#4 posted 11-25-2014 04:00 PM

As Ed said the best thing to repair wood is wood. When patching wood take extra time to match the grain and wood color and have an exact fit, that can make your repair almost invisible

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Shuja

266 posts in 1028 days


#5 posted 11-25-2014 04:02 PM

Yes .Thank you all. When I said I overshot I mean I did not turn soon enough to make a rectangular decorative groove. Sorry I could not upload a picture.

-- shuja

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Shuja

266 posts in 1028 days


#6 posted 11-25-2014 04:03 PM

this is the photo

-- shuja

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#7 posted 11-25-2014 04:08 PM

That one might be a tough fix, it looks like some pretty pronounced grain that will be on an exposed portion, and looks like it’s already glued up. If you have a piece cut off from the end of that board, you may be able to match the grain. I’d still rout entirely across the piece for the patch, I think it’ll be less noticeable than trying to square up the end of the groove and get a piece to fit perfectly.

Another thing to consider, what about widening all of the grooves, and adding a strip of contrasting wood (like the darker wood I see there) around the groove? If you can’t hide it, highlight it. Make it look intentional.

What is this you’re making here?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#8 posted 11-25-2014 04:37 PM

Not sure what your making here,but if you can just us a planner and reduce the thickness of your wood and then you can start over.
you might cutout a templet to follow the design you want to route.

Like this

you use a router guide that looks like this.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 903 days


#9 posted 11-26-2014 08:26 AM

You could take a sharp chisel and cut a shallow recess as drawn here, and let in a grain-matched “Dutchman.”

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Shuja

266 posts in 1028 days


#10 posted 11-26-2014 09:59 AM

Thanks everybody. Lot of suggestions. Each as good as any.
I am making a day bed from various types of wood I was donated, found & bought. The pine wood is bought. The red sandal wood I was given-part of staircase railing, the black/brown lathed wood part of a broken camp cot. I bought the router after gluing because i found it hard to do the back rest. I should have done enough practice before trying on this. But I ended up with this.

-- shuja

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#11 posted 12-01-2014 07:00 PM

So did you find a resolution? Where on the project is this error?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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Shuja

266 posts in 1028 days


#12 posted 12-02-2014 02:22 PM

Sorry.
When I took the picture I did not have the router
The error is on the cross member on the left & right sides
I do not have any off cuts. I am actually searching in the second hand market for a similar piece.
I do not want to go with a contrasting color
Wish me luck

-- shuja

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