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performax 37 dual drum sander vs Grizzly 15 wide belt

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Forum topic by panamawayne posted 11-25-2014 01:37 PM 3156 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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panamawayne

69 posts in 925 days


11-25-2014 01:37 PM

I want to purchase a sander and have read many negatives on drum sanders, I put a bid on Ebay for a 37 inch Performax but after reading all the reviews am having cold feet. Would the 15 inch Grizzly be that much better?
I cant consider the Grizzly stroke sander as a lot of my work is 7 feet long which is bigger than the table although they seem like a nice option otherwise.


15 replies so far

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panamawayne

69 posts in 925 days


#1 posted 11-25-2014 09:48 PM

Nobody? ?

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OhioMike

73 posts in 1629 days


#2 posted 11-25-2014 10:03 PM

Sorry, I have no experience with either tool.

But here is one thing to consider – the Performax will sand veneer down to 1/32” but the Grizzly will only sand down to 1/8”.

When I bought my small drum sander, I picked the a Performax machine over a Grizzly machine for that reason.

Mike

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,

2387 posts in 3013 days


#3 posted 11-25-2014 10:37 PM

I own the 37” Grizzly dual drum sander with 10 hp single phase and we are extremely happy with this sander. I believe it is all we really need at this stage of our shop. My friend has the performax 36” with open stand and 5 hp motor and he complains about it a lot to me. He just thinks nothing is as good as a belt sander. But in my mind a decent belt sander for us would be costly as we would want no less than 36” capacity, and preferrably 42”. And running a 20 hp 3 phase motor on a sander is going to get costly for us.

So the sander we have is a great deal and works perfect, it is very well built, very heavy and looks much heavier built than my friends open stand Performax sander. I have absolutely no complaints on our sander and would recommend it.

That said, if I were looking at paying newer prices, I would strongly entertain purchasing a 50” woodmaster dual drum sander. I am a woodmaster fan and own 2 of their planers in our shop. And they are an American company.

-- .

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,

2387 posts in 3013 days


#4 posted 11-25-2014 10:42 PM

I just realized that I posted on a recent thread of yours and pretty much gave the same advice. I did not realize I was doing this, since you already had asked a similar question. I did not mean to be redundant.

I will say that Woodmaster offers some sort of financing program for their new line of equipment. I think their drum sander deal is really hard to beat on dollar value verse quality of machine.

-- .

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panamawayne

69 posts in 925 days


#5 posted 11-25-2014 11:37 PM

Hi Jerry,

I really appreciate your help, I would say that I am the one being redundant! It’s hard to make a decision based solely on advice from the Internet!
Is a twin drum really important over a single? I do a lot of tongue and groove cielings so speed is a factor, there is little in the way of dry wood down here so a better tolerance for not so dry wood would be a plus, I would imagine that coarser grits would be easier to use in either case?
I also use solid woods exclusively so veneers and plywoods aren’t a factor.

From what I’ve read in regards on drum sanders, it seems that anyone with a drum almost always wants to upgrade to a wide belt?

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Mark Kornell

1061 posts in 1997 days


#6 posted 11-26-2014 12:31 AM

I’ve got the same sander as Jerry, and have about the same feedback. Good machine and great value. I sometimes wish for something wider, but the call for that is rare.

A widebelt is a better machine, but you pay for it. I haven’t yet wished I’d done differently, though.

The double drum can be set up to run two of the same grit, which allows faster stock removal. If you run different grits, you get closer to a finished surface faster.

Don’t know that running wet wood through any sander is a good idea. Not so big an issue for the sander as much as it gums up the paper real quick.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

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panamawayne

69 posts in 925 days


#7 posted 11-26-2014 12:58 AM

Yeah, a solar powered wood kiln is next on my list of things to do. Now I am air drying and using a random orbit sander or belt sander for all my finishing, I have a planer forthe bulk of the work, I want a sander that can flatten glued up panels, doors and tabletops. I don’t mind final sanding with a random sander,especially for the furniture. .I would however like to have something faster for cielings.

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buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1014 days


#8 posted 11-26-2014 01:23 AM

I have the Grizzly G9983 15” open end widebelt sander. I always put the piece I plan to sand between the belt and table before turning the sander on. If you try to take off too much at a time, you could cause yourself problems. I am really glad I skipped the drum sanders and bought the widebelt. Talked to a young guy who graduated from school a few years ago, he said they got a widebelt at our local high school, and kids run a panel in with the thing adjusted too low, and the panel will catch and they sand a deep burn in their panel. What I really enjoy about my sander is the way it flattens my panels. I glue up at 13/16, then grind the panels down to 3/4” and the sander seems to flatten as it sands. Of course I keep reversing the panel and turning it over, but I really enjoy having nice flat panels without the chips you get with a wide planer.

-- Jim from Kansas

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,

2387 posts in 3013 days


#9 posted 11-26-2014 01:32 AM

I have never owned a single drum. I have read many negative reviews on single drum sanders that are lighter duty built. I think you would be looking for a heavier duty machine. My past dual drum sander was the 3 hp Steel city and it just was not built strong enough. I would be looking at the heaviest duty machine I can afford. My Grizzly is a ton better than our past Steel City and it has everything to do with the Grizzly being a heavier built machine.

As for wide belt sanders, I have never used one. Everything I have read indicates to me wide belt sanders are the very best sanders. But when you set down and think of the cost involved weighed against the advantages as per your needs, you may find like I have that a is more than needed. With us I would want a 42 or 44” and the smallest motor I would have to run would be a 20 hp 3 phase. I would have to run my 40 hp RPC to run that. And I would have to run our 5 hp DC. Also those sanders require compressed air which means running our 5 hp quincy. It is just a lot of cost in electricity to gain whatever advantage the wide belt would provide over our current 10 hp Grizzly. The Grizzly we have is heavy enough built, very strong 10hp motor single phase and excels in what we need it for.

-- .

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panamawayne

69 posts in 925 days


#10 posted 11-26-2014 01:37 AM

Another vote for the Grizzly dual drum, all of my current equipment is Grizzly and I am satisfied with it, the 10hp dual drumand 15 inch wide belt Grizzlies are the same price? Decisions decisions?

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,

2387 posts in 3013 days


#11 posted 11-26-2014 01:41 AM

As noted above about flattening panels in the sander, a drum sander will also flatten the panel very well.

I have not checked Grizzly for price, but if the 15” open ended wide belt sander would work and it is within budget, it might be a decent deal as I think that sander might be much less costly to run than what I was referring to in my previous post.

-- .

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,

2387 posts in 3013 days


#12 posted 11-26-2014 01:45 AM

One thing to consider is the belt will last longer than paper on a drum. The belt does not heat up nearly as much as tye drum sander paper. There is less contact with the wood per sq inch on the belt thus less heat build up. In theory the wide belt would be better, if the 15” open end capacity would meet your needs.

-- .

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,

2387 posts in 3013 days


#13 posted 11-26-2014 02:06 AM

I just did a quick look on Grizzly. Tough decision between the two. The shipping weight on the drum sander is around 500 lbs more than on the wide belt sander. Just the way I think but I start to wonder when one is built lighter than the other will that reflect in the overall quality of the machine or lack of… The wide belt sander also only runs a 5 hp motor which I think is a bit small. I know the 3 hp motor in my previous sander was just a tad under powered for some of what we did. I also know my friend who has his 5 hp Performax drum sander he tends to complain about it. I know the wider the board you sand, the more muscle the sander is going to need to power through the task.

Either way you end up going it sounds like you will be heads and shoulders above the way you have been doing the sanding currently.

-- .

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buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1014 days


#14 posted 12-03-2014 01:51 AM

I have experience with only 2 widebelt sanders, one was the speedsander, 37” wide, and my 15” Grizzly, G9983. The speedsander could handle a wide panel, with no need to turn around and run the 2nd time. Plenty of power, lots of HP. You set the same way, not too tight between feed table and belt. The Grizzly has plenty of power for 15” cut. They used to sell the same size 3hp machine, discontinued it. It was on closeout when I ordered the G9983.

-- Jim from Kansas

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Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1667 days


#15 posted 12-03-2014 02:12 AM

I have the SuperMax 37in Dual Drum Sander 7.5hp with the Rubber Conveyer belt. Darn Good Sander. IMOP a drum sander and a belt sander are two diffrent animals. Price and Finish . If you cant afford the wide belt sander then go with the drum. A wild belt sander will leave a nicer finsih. I usually have the first drum at 80 grit and the 2nd at 120 grit. If I have a bad wide board I want to flatten it will switch to more agressive grits till I flatten it out.

Both sanders you need to pay good attention to what grit your using and feed rate as well as debth of cut. Having the Dual Drum sander has saved me a lot of time sanding, One day I would also like a Wide Belt Sander. Just for the nice finish it does leave behind for cabinet doors and wode panels.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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