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Forum topic by rantingrich posted 11-25-2014 02:13 AM 1738 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rantingrich

372 posts in 806 days


11-25-2014 02:13 AM

Does anyone know if one and SHARPEN Thread cutters like on the Ridgid Manual Iron Pipe thread cutter?

By the way. This Big B**H will make a man out of you special threading 1 1/4 inch iron pipe

-- Rich


12 replies so far

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1975 days


#1 posted 11-25-2014 02:16 AM

Actually, I have never had anyone tell me that they needed to sharpen these. I have been in the maintenance field for almost 28 years, and never had to sharpen one. I also own a HF unit, which a local mechanical contractor borrowed for a full two days, threading pipe. Came back sharp as the day I bought it.

What in the world were you threading?

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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rantingrich

372 posts in 806 days


#2 posted 11-25-2014 02:43 AM

I am making STEAMPUNK Furniture. SEE PIC BED. I can get the longer than 27” pipes cut and threaded if I drive to Home Cheapo 20 miles away but they can’t thread pipe shorter that 27” So I do it myself for the most part.

I use a manual ratcheting iron pipe thread cutter 1/4 to 1 1/4”. It’s a real work out. I shattered the one ridged 1”cutter head, pushing it too hard. I got a new one at Menards made by someone else that stills cutting, BUT this weekend it seemed to be chipping out sections of the cut threads. Just a few minutes ago a guy asked me what oil I was using to lube the cutters and I was using 3 in 1 oil cause I could not find my threader cutting oil. So I need to find out what I did with that oil

I am in the middle of a steampunk floor lamp complete with Motion switch. I will post it when finished.

How about them pristine Oak Floors. Got a real steal on the house

-- Rich

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#3 posted 11-25-2014 08:19 AM

I cranked one of those for miles back in the day ;-) Ridgid makes replacement die sets. Be careful to get them in the correct order! A 1 1/4” bender will give the rest of your body a workout if the threading misses part of it ;-) You need real cutting oil. You will just get galling and broken die teeth without it.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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panamawayne

69 posts in 919 days


#4 posted 11-25-2014 08:57 AM

I was a pipe fitter and at times it’s the pipe that causes the problem having impurities, try some different pipe before blaming the dies, also check that the dies didn’t get chipped from the bad pipe.

View 6mmBR's profile

6mmBR

28 posts in 796 days


#5 posted 11-25-2014 02:50 PM

I just retired after 40 plus years as a pipefitter. Check the dies and clean them if necessary. Sometimes bits of metal get jammed in the teeth. If cleaned and still messing up, replace the die sets and the problem is solved.

And if you think 1-1/4” is a workout, wait until you try some 2”. That’s a real treat. Especially in position.

Power tools for $1000, Alex. After the late ‘70s, we only used the manual method on tie-ins. We used a mule for everything else. If you haven’t seen one, think of a really powerful engine lathe with a single purpose, to turn pipe in a circle inside the threading dies. Much better, but pretty expensive.

I have an old Craftsman pipe die set I’ve had for years. I’ve used it at home a lot for running gas pipe and so forth. I’m missing the 2” die but I’m okay with that.

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bigblockyeti

3665 posts in 1181 days


#6 posted 11-25-2014 07:41 PM

I toured the Ridgid factory in Elyria, OH and the geometry of the individual teeth doesn’t lend themselves well to being sharpened. They were using a CNC flooded diamond wheeled grinder to sharpen them. Ridgid does consider them to be consumables and in my experience, especially using a manual vs. power threader, sharp dies can make a huge difference in the force required to cut the threads.

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

880 posts in 1897 days


#7 posted 11-25-2014 08:00 PM

Being retired now, the main thing I miss about Ridgid tools is getting their calendar.

-- Visualize whirled peas

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#8 posted 11-25-2014 08:26 PM



Being retired now, the main thing I miss about Ridgid tools is getting their calendar.

- muleskinner

Yeah! ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2176 posts in 1485 days


#9 posted 11-26-2014 05:26 AM

HF has a powered threader (hand held) that you might check into. I ran some gas pipe (1/2” only), and was pretty tuckered at the end.

I like your steam punk stuff, by the way.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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6mmBR

28 posts in 796 days


#10 posted 11-26-2014 03:30 PM



Being retired now, the main thing I miss about Ridgid tools is getting their calendar.

- muleskinner

Yep, they were something. Brightened up the job sites.

View Neptuno's profile

Neptuno

32 posts in 778 days


#11 posted 11-26-2014 08:36 PM

Rich

Try Boggs in California (http://www.boggstool.com). They sharpen a lot of stuff. As a matter of fact, they sell new, resharpened Nicholson’s # 49 that cuts like butter, much better than the originals.

Pedro

-- We must all cross the line.

View b67mack's profile

b67mack

59 posts in 880 days


#12 posted 11-26-2014 09:16 PM

Get a replacement kit of cutters only

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