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Dewalt 744XRS vs. Dewalt 7491RS Portable Saws

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Forum topic by RMIGHTY1 posted 11-22-2014 06:13 PM 4421 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RMIGHTY1

3 posts in 753 days


11-22-2014 06:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw joining traditional

Trying to decide between the two of these saws. Issues involve trade off between soft start feature and the 32-1/2 inch rip capacity. Those having soft start feature, how much are you loving it? How often would I NEED 32-1/2 inch ripping capacity? Does the 24 inch ripping capacity basically meet all ripping needs?

I know, I know, it all depends on what I need to saw. Using a contractor saw to make cabinets can get kind of tricky. Are any of you actually using a portable saw to build cabinets? Can you use the 24” rip capacity to do so?

I suppose I can have HD or Lowes rip my 4×8 sheets for me at time of purchase. Then will I love the soft start? Bosch and most others have the soft start. I do not think my first generation Ryobi table saw has soft start.

There are many other differences between the two Dewalt portable saws I am considering but these are the two issues stuck in my head. I use the saw as a home hobbyist. I am not a professional using these saws daily for a job.

Features I like about the 7491 are the 32-1/2 rip capacity, open motor area, 2-1/2 inch dust port, accessory storage, a no load speed of 4800 rpm, and costs $10 less. Disadvantages, no soft start, weighs 110#, difficult to remove from portable frame. Features I like about the 744 are the soft start (I do?), 24-1/2” rip (do I need more?), and 91# weight, easy to remove from the portable frame. Features I dislike are the enclosed case (traps more sawdust), 2” dust port, no load speed of 3650 rpm, and costs $10 more. Cost difference really does not bother me. Lotta money, big decision, must live with it.

Too bad I will not be like some ladies I know who will buy a dress, wear it on the w/e and return it on Monday. I should buy both saws and just return one but that is too much hassle for me.

All comments are appreciated.

-- I sawed the board twice and it's still too short!!!


10 replies so far

View jap's profile

jap

1251 posts in 1519 days


#1 posted 11-22-2014 06:49 PM

I have the Ridgid saw and you can see what I’ve built, but I recommend you get a bigger castiron topped saw if you have the space.

-- Joel

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#2 posted 11-22-2014 09:38 PM

Soft start is fine, but for a TS, where the whole machine is reasonably well secured, it really doesn’t mean a whole lot, so I really wouldn’t put too much emphasis on it….different story for a hand held router. With that said, I agree with Joel….unless you really need portability, a full size cast iron saw will have the lion’s share of advantages over a portable. If budget is the driving factor, and not the need for portability, look for a good used saw.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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RMIGHTY1

3 posts in 753 days


#3 posted 11-23-2014 04:16 PM

Space is my driving factor. My Ryobi table saw is stored in Chicago. I have a one car garage and am using it for my workshop and storage. Hope to put in a craft area for my wife. Want to sell the Ryobi and get a more space saving saw. Dewalt, Bosch and Rigid seen to be the leaders.

Thank you all for you input!

-- I sawed the board twice and it's still too short!!!

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#4 posted 11-23-2014 04:19 PM



....Dewalt, Bosch and Rigid seen to be the leaders.

- RMIGHTY1

I’d agree with that….all very nice portables. Buy the one that makes the most sense to you.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View gabriellus's profile

gabriellus

47 posts in 843 days


#5 posted 11-24-2014 06:43 PM

I bought the DWE7491RS in April, my first table saw. Overall, I love the saw. The upsides: excellent fence system, nice guard system, rip capacity, powerful as all get-out, folds up/stores/moves around nicely. Downsides: cost, lack of third party accessories (infeed/outfeed solutions, throat plates, ZCI, etc), non-ferrous table.

My advice is unless you have ZERO ability to wheel and store a cabinet saw against a wall in your shop/garage, this saw fits the bill very well. Plus you can take it with you if you need to.

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1511 days


#6 posted 11-25-2014 03:25 AM

The DWE7491RS is far superior to the DW744XRS (which it replaces). It does have soft start.

A few things I’ll comment on:
  1. The riving knife feature of the DWE7491RS was a real selling point for me. It is remarkably easy to switch from guard to riving knife.
  2. I have used the rip over 24.5+ maybe 1 or 2x so far. For (base) cabinet making, it can come in handy.
  3. The attaching it to the stand is via 4 bolts and is time consuming. I have yet to use the saw on the stand (how often would I need to?) I built my own split-level workbench for the saw that includes about 30 inches of outfeed support.
  4. The saws use the same insert
  5. The open frame design made is incredibly easy to put a clamp on when aligning the saw blade to the miter slots.
  6. The fence is awesome for positioning. Once aligned, I feel confident that i rarely lock it out of square.

In short, my vote is get the DWE7491RS. It is without a doubt it benefits from a lot of design refinements. If you don’t think you need the extra capacity and want to save a few more bucks, get the DWE7490X. Same saw with a different fence (up to ~28” rip), no mobile stand, and about $100 less.

-- paxorion

View gabriellus's profile

gabriellus

47 posts in 843 days


#7 posted 11-26-2014 07:53 PM



The DWE7491RS is far superior to the DW744XRS (which it replaces). It does have soft start.

A few things I ll comment on:
  1. The riving knife feature of the DWE7491RS was a real selling point for me. It is remarkably easy to switch from guard to riving knife.
  2. I have used the rip over 24.5+ maybe 1 or 2x so far. For (base) cabinet making, it can come in handy.
  3. The attaching it to the stand is via 4 bolts and is time consuming. I have yet to use the saw on the stand (how often would I need to?) I built my own split-level workbench for the saw that includes about 30 inches of outfeed support.
  4. The saws use the same insert
  5. The open frame design made is incredibly easy to put a clamp on when aligning the saw blade to the miter slots.
  6. The fence is awesome for positioning. Once aligned, I feel confident that i rarely lock it out of square.

In short, my vote is get the DWE7491RS. It is without a doubt it benefits from a lot of design refinements. If you don t think you need the extra capacity and want to save a few more bucks, get the DWE7490X. Same saw with a different fence (up to ~28” rip), no mobile stand, and about $100 less.

- paxorion

Show me pics of your setup! I wanna see! :)

View RMIGHTY1's profile

RMIGHTY1

3 posts in 753 days


#8 posted 11-27-2014 12:14 AM

Wow, you guys are GREAT!!! Thank you so much for your detailed responses. You sure help make it easier to decide.

-- I sawed the board twice and it's still too short!!!

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1511 days


#9 posted 11-27-2014 01:22 AM


The DWE7491RS is far superior to the DW744XRS (which it replaces). It does have soft start.

A few things I ll comment on:
  1. The riving knife feature of the DWE7491RS was a real selling point for me. It is remarkably easy to switch from guard to riving knife.
  2. I have used the rip over 24.5+ maybe 1 or 2x so far. For (base) cabinet making, it can come in handy.
  3. The attaching it to the stand is via 4 bolts and is time consuming. I have yet to use the saw on the stand (how often would I need to?) I built my own split-level workbench for the saw that includes about 30 inches of outfeed support.
  4. The saws use the same insert
  5. The open frame design made is incredibly easy to put a clamp on when aligning the saw blade to the miter slots.
  6. The fence is awesome for positioning. Once aligned, I feel confident that i rarely lock it out of square.

In short, my vote is get the DWE7491RS. It is without a doubt it benefits from a lot of design refinements. If you don t think you need the extra capacity and want to save a few more bucks, get the DWE7490X. Same saw with a different fence (up to ~28” rip), no mobile stand, and about $100 less.

- paxorion

Show me pics of your setup! I wanna see! :)

- gabriellus

Next time I drag my saw out for use I’ll snap a picture and post it up.

-- paxorion

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1511 days


#10 posted 11-27-2014 01:24 AM



Wow, you guys are GREAT!!! Thank you so much for your detailed responses. You sure help make it easier to decide.

- RMIGHTY1

Keep us posted on which way you go. I should also note that when I was looking for a saw, it was a toss-up between the Bosch 4100 and the Dewalt DW744XRS, with more of a skew towards the Bosch. The improvements to the guard and riving knife (an actual separate piece), and the ease of swapping it on the DWE7491 is what tipped my preference in favor of the new Dewalt.

-- paxorion

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